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TOPICS OF THE DAY.

| From Ovr Special Correspondent.]

London, August 2,

a bloodhound detective.

Hunting up copy about the Whitechapel murder, I came across a private inquiry agent the other day who told me several interesting stories. We got talking, for example (apropos of a flaring shilling shocker entitled 'Richard Barlow, Bloodhound,' which decorates the bookstalls just now, of instinct, and whether, as a rule, detectives found it desirable to let their feelings guide them. My acquaintance replied "No, not as a rule." He had, however, known one man whose inßtinct in a number of cases had pulled him through, and who certainly did seem to be a sort of human bloodhound. This inspector was employed in the famous Constance Kent murder case, in which, you remember, a young girl, out of envy and hatred, suffocated her stepmother's baby and concealed the body in a privy. Directly the detective saw all the parties concerned in this tragedy he felt a lightning like conviction (founded on no sane evidence whatever) that the quiet, composed little Constance was the criminal. The evidence against the girl, however, proved elight, and she was discharged alter a police inquiry before the magistrates. A tremendous newspaper outcry against the detective followed, and he lost his place at Scotland Yard. A few years later, of course, Constance Kent (then in a Protestant convent at Brighton) confessed, and expiated her offence by fifteen years* penal servitude. I saw her when I weut through Millbank some time ago. She was about to be discharged on the following Monday, and to return to the Brighton convent. The wayward, passionate girl of twenty had become a quiet, grey-haired, shadow-like elderly woman, with a face full of peace and restfulness.

" V-LKASE ! "

Who is next to be married ? is the tion of the hour. An enterprising London letter-writer for one of the provinsial papers says he knows, and gives the public just enough to make it wish for more. The brilliant gentleman informs us on his honor as a journalist (gracious!) that Princess Victoria of Wales comes nest, and that her husband has already been chosen for her by the people about tho Court. "He is the son of one of tho most London of the peers," says the soribbler, " his father being a member of the Government and very rich. Both father and son are sufficiently popular. The lad only came of age last month, and is, only famous in the negative way of being the only modern swell who has apt made a, fool of himself in his. salad days. Jf he marries the Princess he will he able," continues the gosaip, "to give her as fine a home as any in EJngland—when completed," is the Blight reservation which he throws in here. The present title of the expectant suitor, or auitor expectant, to be correct, is, wo are carefully informed, derived from a metropolitan borough, As the man in the novel says: " Here is a clue." On his ma's side he is descended from a famous soldier, and all— all, mind you—his sisters and cousins and qiinfcs are countesses. Dear me ! caij it be. our dear old friend the "Duka of Seven Diala** again ? It surely mupt be, when, one remembers th&s t!;e na,nje is. derived from a metropo,tftjA? bprongl*. We shall have " lum Tu,n\,"' as the Prinoe of Wales is affeptlonately cabled, singing the dear old song:

I shall ascot forget my Vio'y, / shall never forget her smiles, Hut I'm sorrv the flirted quite bo much With thu Uake of Seven Dials !

KYKLE BEUiEW AT HIS. yAMES. AGAIN.

The dear, delightful feljpw,, the irrepressible " Curly," has begun agaip. Bis lovely lips, entranwig eyes, voluptuous voice, and the irresistible mole oa the oheek have again procured him the satisfaction of ruining another home, and dragging another frail but fair woman to as near his own level as ho oonveniently can. You in the colonics doubtless remember the young man well. His latest conquest (to say. victim, might be libel) is a Mrs Leslie Carter, who. will shortly appear on the boards of an American theatre. "My huajoand, after the divorce suit (in which, cjaae Curly figured so prominently), the lady says, "every respectable, of revenue against me. I must jive, and there is but one way. left open now. I must turn to ike stage." Here is a q.e.f. indeed), bnt the stage is not grateful to, the ex-, pupil of Bellew for treating it as a pi& alter, and has declared; war against her. The unfortunate, but it must be confessed rather meehftnio lady divorcee, la a pretty young creature, with almost a redundancy of physical attractions, She has an elegant figure, a piquant face, pouting lips, a large, sensual mouth with lovely teeth, and a pair of almost cbildish grey eyes. Her great attraction, however, lies in her hair, huge masses of Titianesque, leeks, tumbled anywhere ever her head.. It is not yet decided what line she will take up, but comedy-drama is what she fancies herself at.. If she is now going to, be very proper, perhaps Miss Reade'e 'lt's never top Late to Mend' dp, or. even. ' Posg&t-me-not, Curly ."■• ■'-'■

XVRy- 30M0S.

I '.'.Glorious Goodwood" was quite its | traditional self on Tuesday afternoon, and, i standing under the trees watching the manycolored Stewards' Cup cavalcade come sweepinn down the hill towards home in the bright sunshine, one almost forgot the dismal drenching anniversary of 'BB. Ispi that the result of this most popular of sprint races was quite in accordance with expectation. The colors of tha favorite (that arch-im-postor, Dajabydale) were, as at Ascot* nowhere to be seen, and the magnificent Amphioii just failed to beat the record by a neck, The winner (Dog Robo) was backed, very heavily when the weight*fiist appeared, and for some time mi\a& have been almost actual favorite. QriTaesday, Mr A. James and his. trainer, Ja?«:;8, did not ex« press thei&seivea s&njr>£ne, and the old h,w«6 wost a* aminouaV V the betting (repeating i from 8 to I- *r o 100 to 7) that scojos who had intended backing it stood alcpf. The pencils t>f the Ring did not fortunately have their usual effect 03 Dog Rose, indeed the : six-year-pld soa of See Saw and Hedge Rose showed extraordinary gameness. At tVa 1 distance the latter and Amphion q&i»« out ■ ; by themselves and ian a severe raee home, f of which Dog Rose had always a little the ; best,' and won by a nee!;. Npblo Chieftain, three-quarters of a,iengt)h off, was third, and Gervas four,tl. Bullion (backed to win a {ortune).ran absolutely last, and Martley and [The Gloamiq again disappointed their parties' expectations. !' In the Richmond Stakes Tom Cannon iintroduced ijs to teorden Gate, a fine upstanding bay, sob of Bend Or and Palisade, tjbM bea.6 three better favorites in Forti-

tude, Arcadia, and Orwell. The latter is His Grace of Westminster's brother to Ormuz.

Captain Machell'd Irish bred youngster Rathheal (by Boulevard—Hollythorn) carn d his 71b penalty for winning at Sundown, triumphantly to victory in the flalnaker Stakes at Goodwood, notwithstanding the presence of a good field of seven. Of these Lord Penrhyn's Far Miente had a big following after the noble owner accepted Ll.ooo to LSOO and L7OO to L4OO. In consequence 100 to 30 could be had about Rathbeal, who won in a canter by two lengths.

A friend writes me that, passing the Eaton Paddocks last week, he bade farewell to Ormond, who sails next month for the Plate. There is, however, no fear of the breed dying out, as in addition to a beautiful yearling filly, the Duke of Westminster has a fine colt foal by Bend Or—Lily Agnes. Ayrshire was this week despatched to Welbeck Stud Farm, and has bidden a final farewell to the racecourse, fclis turf career was from first to last marked by great good luck. Had Friar's Balsam kept well last year, and Seabreeze this, we should never have heard of the son of Hampton and Atalanta, save as a second-rate Bort of Bard. When one finds a Derby third like Martley running unplaced in the Stewards' Cup at Goodwood, with only 7st 81b on its five-year-old-back, one begins to understand what a wretched field Merry Hampton must have had to beat.

The time-honored Ham Stakes at Goodwood did not produce a serious race, as Mr Cloete's First' Fruit, which alone dared to face Mr Manton's Riviera (sister to Seabreeze), could not make the latter gallop, and was beaten long before the distance.

LITERARY NOTES,

The title of George Meredith's much-talked-of and eagerly-anticipated novel of literary life in London has at last been fixed on. It is ' One of Our Conquerors.' Wilkie Collins has appointed Hall Caine his literary executor and biographer. The latter will presently complete the story which the veteran novelist had on the stocks, when he was taken ill. Mr Caine's own new novel, 'Tha Bondman' (now running serially in the Tillotaon newspapers), is, in the author's opinion, his strongest work. He has already dramatised it, and Wilson Barrett will produce the play this winter in America. lor 1891 Hall Caine has planned a novel called * The Prophet,' which will be a daring attempt (a la Vogel) to look into the future, He has also, he says, Moorish, Roman, American, and Irish plays in preparation, and may do a drama founded on a Norse legend for Henry Irving. Apropos of Browning's terrific onslaught on hi& deceased friend Edward Fitzgerald, which I recently sent you, Hall Caine has committed; the following:—

TO BROWNING,

Good Giant, you've left it (or Time to trae& The mark of your hand on a dead man'& be** You were wise, though you've mined, the smile that we won with It, Only to smite when Fitzgerald wadooe with it Owing to the phenomssal demand for the cheap (2s) edition of ' Lorna Doone,' the publishers were compelled to postpone the issue for a week. It is noteworthy that thousand* have been ordered for India and the Australias, where the sis shilling editioa did not sell specially well. The leading features of «Blackwood's' new serial, «Travel, Sport, and Adventure,' this month are " The North-east Passage," "Two Nights in Southern Mexico," "A "Bear Adventure in Ceylon," and "A Ride Across the Peloponnese," by George A. Macmillan, the young man who has just lost his life on Mount Olympus under painful circumstances.

Sir Edwin Arnold has a. son who, I'.'ue himself, dabbles in Oriental poetry, and is besides, a fairy atoryteller. This yoaMster will presently supply the 'lllustrated News' with ' The Adventures of PKur the Phoenician,' a romance of more solid pretensions than even 'Cleopatra.' Mr Marion Crawford's 'Sant Ilario' belongs to his Italian Beries of stories, and will not be as popular wi& the general public as 'Greiffenstein'or 'Paul Patoff.' It is to be added forthwith to Maemillon'a Colonial Library. The ourrent »Spectator» (July 27) contain* an amusing article on 'Student's. Blunders, whioK should on no account b& overlooked. Here is an ideal mistranslatjo? < " Otna minittratur pueris Mbus"— "The cana is being applied to three boys." The author of the following two deserves, our gratitude: " Finitomus. oratori -poeta sermoni nicentior, numeris restriction "—"An orator lived next door to a poet more loose m his talk, but mos* guarded than numbers.

A musical frfcnd cruelly dednea a girl of fifteen a.» m. arpeggio. At twenty, however, she becomes an alkgro vivace; at tfcirty an accardo forte ; at forty an andante ; at fifty commences the rondoJinah >' and at sixty it is a tremolo alio sordina. A new sixpenny weekly on ths same Ikes as the 'Spectator' will b* started in the autumn in the Home B,»!e interest. Mr T Wemyss Reid is to b* editor.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890921.2.32.7

Bibliographic details

TOPICS OF THE DAY., Issue 8018, 21 September 1889, Supplement

Word Count
1,954

TOPICS OF THE DAY. Issue 8018, 21 September 1889, Supplement

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