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The Evening Star. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1889.

Tjie third session of the Tenth Parliament of New Zealand has come to An Uii- the eDfl of its ig nomimous satisfactory career. Never has there been Sesttion. a 3 eEßion so unfruitful _ of results, so wearisome in its details, or conducted so exasperating. Time was when we were wont to hold up our Parliament as a model and an example to the sister colonies. It is no longer possible to assume such high ground. Little by little there has been a steady declension in its usefulness and in the standard of its members, till now, in the year 1383, we view the pitiable spectacle of men—the chosen of the people—spending nearly three months in unbefitting wrangling, accomplishing nothing for those ivhom they are sent up to represent. Whether this is in any way to be accounted for by the unwholesome atmosphere of Wellington reacting on _ tho mental temperament of the members, ib is impossible to say, Much is, no doubt, attributable to the disorganised state of parties. With a Government dependent on the grudgingly-given support of its erratic followers, and an Opposition composed of incohesive parties with a weak nominal leader, nothing better could have been possible than a dissolution and an appeal to the country. Put this is an issue from which both aides of the House shrank, and in their own interests rejected. Meanwhile, time has been wasted, for little or nothing has been done. The Parliament has be«cme a place Where policy is busies ali night long tn aettifii' rijfht what faction hay set wrong, Where Kailn of oratory thresh the lioor That yield* tiieci cJwtf and dust-aqd nothing more. The session was opened on June 20 with a Speech of even more pronounced vagueness: than is usual in auch speeches. Some congratulation there was on the "much improved condition of affairs," and upon " the cost of administering the government " and increasing -ihe public revenue having "fortunately been successful." This triumphant strain was up during tho greater part of the Speech, and then sundry measure of reform were promised, audi a si the revision of the laws regulating the diction of members of the House of Repre. sentatives, the introduction of an electora 1 Bill based on the Ha#e system, a Civil Service amending Bill, an amended Hospitals aud Charitable Aid Bill, Bills dealing with; the law of copyright, with patents ; &n& trade j marks, a Medical Practitioners Bill, another, for improving the mode of registering trans-' {era of personal property, and a Bill for consolidating and amending the law of bankruptcy. AH of these are useful, and some are noceswy measures. But where are they ? E'or Lkfi most part they have been relegated to the ifspho of good intentions, and petty faction fights have usurped the time that should have heaa .devoted to the promotion of the interests of tfce.cwotry. Let us take a brief review of the priafiipal occurrences of the session. Very soon after ( the assembling of Parliament the members oi the Opposition met in conclave and elected Mr BAI&4STCE as Leader—a circumstance which afforde/i satisfaction all round, because the disunited at° ms acting in opposition would, it was supposed, now coalesce and conduct the business of Parliamentary warfare upon more definite in 4 well assured lines. But it soon became evident that, although poor Mr BaIIAKCE hfcd pe<*& hoisted to the pinnacle of leadership, his followers would only follow him when it pleased them so to do. From the flrfefc there was no loyalty displayed by them; and if formerly they had been as sheep without a shepherd, he was often a shepherd <iecer-fced by his sheep. No doubt, he did his best to promote organisation, and his best showed "how utterly unfit he was for the task. In due time the of Electors Bill and a Corrupt Praetices Bill j/ejb ifcrought in, debated, read a' second time, ,apd dropped. Then came the first Representation Bill, of which the best that can be said is 4h*.fc it was a cumbrous attempt to reconcile the EUre system with the identification of separate electorates—the scrutin de lisle with the &rutin d'arremdissement—a, grotesque impossibility. The Bill was formally debated for several days and then withdrawn. This last went occurred on July 12, up to which date abbofotely no •.business had been transacted. Three wcqkp —t, fourth of the whole session—had thus beert frittered away by purposeless discussions, after the fc"Mon of a debating society. On the 16th, the reaf policy measure of the Government-the Replantation Bill No. 9_ W as brought up for a aecwtf reading. It may be noted that leave to in ) r <*£ oe tl "f measure was asked and obtained on fchp-I?th, before EM No. 1 had been disposed x>f,< which goes to show that the last-named was never seriously Intended to be enacted. And now came the tug of war. lne great question of the waa rawed. By the Act of 18S7 a " addition of 18 per cent, was ordered to bp svJLdcd to the population of the country districts, a> p.s to equalise their representation with that ov the towns. At any rate, that was the; reason alleged. But in the interval a strong feeling had grown up wongst the country members that this addition \/a& insufficient, and, finding themselves in j.n absolute majority in the House, they now denoted a difference of 33J per cent. Upon this, point the contest was waged. The country party, secure in their strength, took but little active part in the controversy. The town party had all the talk to themselves, and how it ended we all know. The country was victorious all along the line. But the protest of the towns was fierce and prolonged. After four days' debate—all on coa side—the Bill was suffered to pass the second reading. But when it was sought to consider it iu .committee the struggle commenced in eai-iwit. From July 24 to August 3 the House tat day And night, with brief intervals,, .of s>? will of

the Chairman of Committee and with decent respect for the Sabbath day ; so that in the pages of ' Hansard ' the proceedings of the whole of this period of nine sitting day 3 appear there as on July 24 only. Early in the debate strangers were ordered to withdraw, the galleries were ek'nrnd, and the reporters lia'l an acceptable respite from their labors. Conacci'.ifr.tly nothing is known of what way said and done during all tho.se days and night 3 except what is furnished by the record of the divisions. What periods of burning eloquence, what patriotic appeals, what learned disquisitions have thus been lost we shall never know. Probably in due courso, when Parliament is exchanged for the platform, the prime actors in that stubborn fight will tell us all they can about it, and let us dream the rest. The inevitable result came at last. Passive resistance can break down the most well-organised stonewall, and in the end a majority of thirty ordered the House into committee, and the struggle, although fitfully maintained, was practically over. Eventually the Bill was carried through all its stages in both Houses of Parliament, and is now the law of the land.

Another " stonewall" was set up in the Property Assessment Bill, and lasted for six days. In this instance the Government not only did not score a large majority, but had a very narrow escape from defeat, the Bill being only carried by four votes against its opponents. On looking at the division list we find no indication of party leadership on either side. The members seem to have voted as their individual opinions inclined them; and although the amendment to throw out the Bill, having been accepted as a " no-confidence" motion, necessarily involved the fate of the Ministry, more than one of the supposed Ministerial party voted against the Government. This is a forcible illustration of the utter disorganisation and political demoralisation of the House. The position assumed by Ministers was that revenuo had to be provided—that the substitution of a land tax would involve a considerable deficiency, which would have to be made up by iucreased Customs duties, and that it was not desirable to make such increase. But argument had little effect on members who wanted the Property Tax abolished at all hazards, and the existence of the Government was jeopardised without any regard to the possible coneequences. As to the Opposition, they were simply obstructive. Powerless for any good purpose, they were all-powerful for evil. Obstruction is the policy of a minority, because a few brazen-voiced and leathern-lunged talkers can always weary their opponents. Hence it has happened that measuie after measure—some very desirable ones, too—has been abandoned after discussion. A notable instance of this is afforded by the fate of the Libel Bill, which, based on the lines of the English Act, was introduced in and passed by the Legislative Couneil, only to be slaughtered on its second reading being moved in the House by the opposition of Mr Samuel and others of the same genus. The object of this Bill was to remove from the Press the responsibility of publishing, in good faith, reports of the public sayings of public men. It is surely reasonable that a fair, truthful report of such sayings should not involve newspapers in costly actions at law, but that the speaker of the words should be made answerable. This view, however, did not aeem to commend ftself to the lawyers of the House, who, being wise in their generation, are aware that it is seldom anyone worth powder and shot who perpetrates verbal slander, whilst the newspapers are usually good for costs. Be that as it may, the Bill wa3 smothered, and no more was heard of it.

Of the Otago Central Railway Bill enough has already been said. It may, however, be added that its loss is due in the first instance to tho* delay allovvod to intervene between its introduction and its final rejection. In the long interval between these two points cabals of all kinds were got up to defeat it. /Other railways were wanted—railways from Greymoutb to Hokitika, Eketahuna to Woodyille, to Seaward B.nsh, to Pubipuhi, to Te Aro, and no on—and unless all .these could be included jn th,e Bill, then Otago should act have its main .central line. Qi old, members were accused of rolling each other's logs ; but now the iscccpted process seems to be to impede each othjers logs, on the principle "If I can't gel what I want, you shall not have what you want!" with tho result that nobody gets anything. That there is nothing in common between the Otago Central Railway and the other lines mentioned docs not affect these misguided people ju the least. Then Mr Ballance, the elect .cxf " Her Majesty's Opposition," having first .deoijir,;d that the Bill was an excellent Bill, and i&& £i_3 entire approval, executed the gymnastic feat o,' .vaulting over iiis own opinion, aud further op in juhp came debate declared that the Bill was an tlto- i gether atrocious measure, and should not i;e suffered to proceed. And so strong was the spirit of fuol.ion that Mr Larnach sacrificed the interests of his own constituents and of Ota/jo by recording his vote against it. We are informed that out of loan the sum of £60,000 still remains to be expended on this work sufficient to carry it on till next session, when tho Premier has promised a deputation of Otago representatives that he will include the proposals of the Bill in his public Works polidy,' so that the whole must he zqippied or cdl rejected. We shall eee. ' I

The reform of tiae long been the subject of parliamentary consideration, and many haye been tfee apjiemes proposed for that purpose. But all baye failed, for the simple reason that the Legislative Counell has a very potent voioo In the matter, and objects to be reformed. The members of that august Chamber are not enable of such a sublime effort of selfabnegation r,s that made by the other branch of the Legislate in reducing the number of members—an instance of political suicide by at least twenty.fivi ci them. The Council would have none of it, and threw it out by a majority of 11. We are not prepared to say that this is a matter for regret. There are some good points in the Bill, but they are more than counterbalanced by the complexities in which they are enveloped, 'jt v 4? scarcely practical, and it is questionable whether its provisions would have been practicable'ii'im* Jafcc operation. However, well of jlJi >t hag tec;: oonsigned to the limbo of forgotten "fads.V There is a strong suspicion that Sir i'pjiftisnK'K WniTAKER is the begetter of r.iany of these curioua measures, and that he is allowed to amuse himself with them in the solitudes of the Council Chamber jn consideration of the valuable services which ho, in other ways, renders to the Ministry.

The promised Bankruptcy Bill never came up'lor consideration at all; and the Hospitals and .C&aritefcla Aid Bill, after having been once or twice'.discueoed in a limp and Bpiritlce» manner, vati '^6*6^'to perish in the sessional massacre of' tfio yinqiefatß,' In all, no leas than eighty' Bills w'.ere deluded ini the general slaughter $ one deserving sp,ce^, mention being a measure having for its object the continuance of expiring laws, which, not having been renewed, will require re enactment next session. \Q£ private Bills which have been brought in only to bs cast forth or smothered under tiioyast pile ,gf of the Day," the moat notable are Mr S&«?ei,'s Divorce Extension and Amendment BJU. Mr Pyke's Private Schools Bill, ac 4 Mr Bispnw'§ £old Duty Abolition Bill. Into this merits .of i these we do not propose to enw* beyond saying that the Divorce Bill offered In. creased facilities for the disruption of the matrimonial' Ijoni; that the Private School Bill w«i regarded" ao a .dangerous blow at the present educational system t ; and that the abolition of the gold fluty wo,uld piously cripple the finances of thoze counties where, l&ld is mostly obtained. The Kight Hours Bilt vw> ft praiseworthy attempt to legaligfi eight haura *# a day of labor, and if it went io further than tUfti it would be unobjectionable. But in endeavoi-Jn/s to prescribe that no one should be permitted £3 work more than eight hours, Mr Taylor perpetrated, an evident absurdity. Everyman has a right to work as long as he likes 1 within the limits prescribed by physical exigencies, it being always wdors'tood that his payment is proportionate'. ?."fc la in tnis sense > aud ln . this wpae only, tliat tjhe efgtt hours system ; is regarded in yictoria, W%c, we think/ the eight houru jwoyemen.t and, where it is celebrated every year as ajfes-t trvsi, with beat of drum 6.<oA much waving ■ of bannera, Mr Mackenzie's CUtfornion i Thistle Bill W&e most unwisely suffered to drop, for the weed is a very pernicious one, and when once it takes hold is far more difficult to eradicate than its 'Scottish

cousin. The Government should certainly take it in hand. The Educational Franchise Bill of Major Steward deserved a better fate than was accorded to it. It made provision principally for the proper definition of the term "householder" and for the abolition of the cumulative vote. It passed through the representative Chamber without serious opposition of aDy kind, only to be strangled in the Council. This will not redound to the credit of what is sometimes termed the " upper Branch " of the Legislature. There are some others of these small Bills which enjoyed an ephemeral existence at the cost of some pains to their political godfathers and of many pence to the public, but the most notable have been passed under review.

Two special sensations have been provided by Ministers for the delectation of members and the public. The first in order 18 the Fisher-Gasparini affair. The details of this affair are so well known to the public that it would be almost an impertinence to repeat them. President Lincoln has warned all men against the folly of "swapping horses in mid-stream," and it is dangerous to quarrel with an ally on the eve of a campaign. There seems, however, to have been no help for it. Mr Fisher provoked hia own dismissal; and then carrying his rancour into the House, he set himself to work, something after the fashion of an angry gadfly, buzzing around and endeavoring to sting his late colleagues. Whatever the merits of the case may be—and we have already dilated upon them—it must be said of him that he certainly did not bear his altered fortunes with dignity, nor even with equanimity, and as a result the House was treated ad nauseam to a series of attacks and replications which might well have been omitted, if only for decency's sake. The Hislop-Ward-Christie quarrel was another unfortunate affair. The House, led by the Premier, refused to grant a committee of inquiry into the circumstances of the case ; but the Council did appoint a committeo, which fairly crushed the Colonial Secretary by a report which amounted to a vote of censure on his action. Thereupon Mr Hislop resigned not only his official position, but also his seat in the House. It is erroneously supposed that one Chamber of the Legislature should not take cognisance of what occurs in the other. But this is not the constitutional practice in England. When the House of Commons censured Lord Chancellor Westbury in 1865, he immediately resigned the Chancellorship. But he did it gracefully. " With legard to the opinion which the House of Commons has pronounced," he said, "I do not presume to say a word. I am bound to accept the dtcition." Mr Hislop does not accept the decision. He protests against it. There is all the difference. It must be exceedingly disheartening to Sir Harry Atkinson to find two of his colleagues thus embarrassing his actions; and if he is at times somewhat surly, as his supporters are prone to complain, it really is not to be wondered at.

The Leader of the Opposition—to give him his title—played a very clever card at the end of the session, only it did not happen to be a trump. Appropriately enough he chose Saturday evening for this purpose. His motion waß a fitting prelude to a day of rest. It ran thus:—"That in " the opinion of this House it is expedient " that there should be a dissolution of Parliament, after due time has elapsed, to " arrange the districts, and that the new " Parliament should meet for the despatch " of business as soon as possible after the " expiration of the present financial year." It was scarcely to be expected that twentyone members of the House would perpetrate the "happy despatch" consequent on the reduction of their numbers, Still there must have been a great many willing martyrs, or perchance they were sustained by their self-assurauce that they would not be amongst the victims. It was a heavy burden to lay upon them, all thjngsconsidered. Nevertheless they rose to the occasion in the fond hope of inflicting a blow on the Ministry, and, pairs being counted, forty-one patriotic members vrted for dissolution. The .Government escaped by a majority of five only. It'js clear frorn the evidence afforded by the division in this Instance, aud by the still smaller majority on the Property Assessment Bill, that Ministers have but a slender hold upon the House, and the fourth session may witness a change which may be entertaining to those who take part in it, but will scarcely be beneficial to the country. We look through the division list, and fail to discern amongst Mr Balance's adherents any indication of political talent, and, whilst we are far from deeming the present the best possible Ministry, wo cannot but regard a chango at the present juncture as inopportune. Nothing will tend to confirm the good opinion that our English friends are beginning to eutertaiu of us so much as the stability of the Government, and to this consideration many things must be subordinated. The mail services have been re-arranged on slightly easier terms. That the San Francisco service should have been reinstated, if only for twelve months, is not surprising when the various influences bearing on its continuance are taken into consideration. It la true that practically it cost 3 little—only a few hundreds per annum —after credit ia taken for mail receipts; but the days of subsidies to any service are on the wane, and payment for the carriage of mails at a fixed tariff must very soon supersede the present system. One graceful Act was done by the House in it 3 last sessional moments. The handSQmc sum of £2,000 was voted for the d&ughfcehj of James Macandrew. Whatever may be caifif, Mr Macandrew was a man whose very bewb .and soul were engaged in the endeavor to advance the country of his adoption, and in the almost unanimous vote of the House his eulogium was forcibly pronounced. Yesterday, after a final wrangle between Mr Fisher and his late chief, the House adjourned itself, with the understanding that it would be prorogued by a notice in the 'Gazette.' And thus ingloriously this most barren of sessions oame to its muchdesired end.

The amount collected in Wellington on behalf of the London strikers by affiliated trades and the general public amounts to LB2, which has been cabled Home. At the adjourned inquest at Napier on the body of the new-born child of Mary Kyle a verdict equivalent to manslaughter was returned, and Bhe was committed for trial on that charge. The South Dunedin Counoil have granted permission to the Tramways Company to charge penny fares between Manse street and the Caversham and Ocean Beach termini.

William E. Bannister, formerly a clerk in the Postal Department, was yesterday committed for trial at Wellington on a second charge of misappropriation of Government inpneiya. The other charges were re '• - ■ Te Kooti was expected in Auckland today to consult Mr Napier, solicitor, with regard to his late arrest at Opotiki, Mr Napier intends to move in the Supreme Court to set aside the order to make Te Kooti find sureties.

The Wesleyan Church members at Nelson have passed a resolution affirming the that the Wesleyan Church in New'2Jealana should have a separate conference independent #f Australia. They have alsb resolved to incite the Rev. F, Isitt, of Invercargill, to tako charge of the Nelson circuit next year, the term of the Rev. W. C. Oliver expiring.

Reports from Samoa state that although thflr;3 ts considerable difference of opinion as to the necessity for relief, the supply of 800 bags of rice sent from Sydney was very welcome to tllP Natives, and that there is a probability of great hardship, if not starvation, during the next three months', Queen Charlotte of Tonga died suddenly on Bep-' tember 8. She was buried on the 10th with:' regal pomp, thousands of her countrymen attending he? funeral. ' Tho sittings of the Supreme Court at, Hokitika opened yesterday before Mr Justice Denniston. There was a very light calendar. Sinclair pleaded guilty to a charge of larceny, and was- sentenced to twelve months' imprisonment. M'Williams, who is a V/ell.known co'a'chdriV'er''on the Croy- ; moutfi-Keeftcd r.vad, was found not "guilty, on the fjrst Qhul'go o? embezzlement. The Crowa prosecutor was so' dejoido this merging whether |i? woujd go on sjth the secttftd charge,

The New Plymouth Borough Council received no tenders for their L 29,000 5 per cent. loan.

The Rev. C. Bradbury, who has received a call from the Moray place Congregational Church, is at present in charge of the church at Linwood, in the suburbs of Christchurch. The congregation of that church last Sunday expressed a wish that he should uot leave. The ' Press' says that the congregation were unanimous in expressing their appreciation of Mr Bradbury. The ' Post' states that a private letter has been received from San Francisco, written by a well-informed correspondent, who says :—" There is a very strong agitation on foot to adopt a policy of subsidising American steamship lines as a measure of national defence against British aggressive policy, and this feeling has been intensified by the terms of the latest Canadian-Pacific subsidy as embodied in a Treasury minute. A great representative conference on the subject of steamship subsidies and an Australian cable will be held here on the 29th insfc. It is probable Congress will meet in October next, but that is uncertain. I have no doubt the Australian service will be sub sidised by Congress." , The following telegram was last Friday ! received by the Mayor of Queenstown from the Hon. T. Fergus, Minister of Justice, in reply to a resolution passed at a public meeting held at Queenstown last Wednesday :--" Wellington, 13th September.— Your telegram, conveying resolution of public meeting, has given me great pleasure, and I wish to express my deep sense of the kindness of my friends in strengthening my hands at this time by such a resolution. I have been much gratified by many expressions of confidence in my action from many parts of the colony, but I specially value such a resolution from my old friends in Queenstown,—T. Fergus." A curious point came under the notice of the Auckland Education Board lately. It seems that u householder in a country district determined to attend a meeting of the School Committee, and also took a friend with him. The chairman objected to their presence, on the ground that the meeting was a private one. The housoholdei ana his friend were not impressed with the reasoning, and maintained their ground, whereupon the Committee withdrew, turned the key in the lock, and went to another place and held their meeting. About midnight the householder and his companion were released from their durance vile. The householdet wanted to know whether he could not get redress for his grievances. The Board came to the conclusion that the Education Act laid down no rule on the matter, and that the School Committee had the power of regulating their own committee meetings. It seems that by the Act ratepayers have the right to attend meetings of a Highway Board, bnt the Education Act does not contain an eipiess clause giving such right. A meeting of tho Ravenßbourne congregation was held in the church last night to consider the desirableness of asking the Presbytery to moderate in a call. Rev. Mr Borrie was Moderator ; the other members of Presbytery present being Messrs Porter, I'inlayson, and Cameron. It was unanimously agreed, in order to facilitate the settlement of a minister, that for a time the two wines be used at tho sacrament. It was then moved by Mr M'Culloch that the Presbytery be asked to moderate in a oall to the Rev. Bruce Todd. Mr John Reid moved that Mr G. H. Mackenzie's name be inserted in the call, Mr Henderson moved an amendment that the Presbytery be asked to moderate in an open oall, which the Moderator urged the congregation to agree to as being the most advisable under the circumstances. A vote having been taken between Mr Todd and Mr Mackenzie, twenty-one voted for the former and fifteen for the latter. It was then put to the meeting whether they would insert Mr Todd's name in the call or agree to Mr Henderson's amendment, when the latter was carried by a large majority, Mr Borrie haying again urged its adoption. Mr Barclay then moved —"That the minority, whichever side' it might be on, should agree to give in with the majority." This was carried unanimously with the exception of Mr Henderson, who was slightly hissed. The Presbytery then agreed to moderate in a call on the evening of Monday, the 30th, at eight o'clock. The ' Daily News' of the 25th July informs ua that "advices from Nanking reveal a state of blissful quietude among the religious bodies of all denominations, including those peculiar to the native faith. Side by side with the accounts of the opening of a Presbyterian church, which was attended by all tho Protestant missionaries, we have some curious items of intelligence as to the religious movement in China itself. The matter-of-fact way in which these details are given is not their least curious feature. In order to put an end to a distressing drought the authorities have brought a dragon 'of the proper sort' into the city, and are supplicating very earnestly his vote and interest for rain. The Native Governor-General has established his adopted , son as abbot of a large Buddhist monastery, and built for him a splendid temple. One of the halls alone ia famished with nearly a hundred idols, each more than twice the I size of life. The great bell of Hung-wu, I which has long lain half buried in tho ground, defying all the resources of Native engineering, h?s at length been lifted by foreign machinery, and hung in a pagoda built of iron by a foreign firm. According [ to a most respectable prophecy, this bell was never to be lifted until China had entered upon a new career of prosperity. Wo may, therefore, expect piping times. A large bronze idol has recently arrived from Hunan, probably to reinforce the dragon in the event of any difficulty with the drought. It was received with extraordinary ceremony. Tho officials went out in state to worship at the ship's side, and there was a keen competition anions; the multitude for the ashes of the incense burnt before the shrine."

At the annual distribution of prizes in connection with the scripture examinations conduoted by the Otago Sunday SchoDl Union, held at Knox Church last evening, the Rev. R. R. M. Sutherland, one of the examiners, kept those present in a state of merriment for some considerable time by giving the answers of some of the candidates to Bcriptural questions. The examiners, said Mr Sutherland, had acquired some new and strange information, and he proposed to give the meeting some of the highest specimens. For instance, they were astonished to learn that, according to one of the papers, EH first told that Jesus had risen—(laughter)—and in another paper that it was the Philistines who first told them that Jesus had risen.—{Loud laughter.) Then they were told that Pilate was one of Jesus's disciples (laughter) that Pilate was a High Priest, and that Pilate was also a leper.— (Renewed laughter.) They were also told that Peter betrayed Jesus ; then that Moses was the betrayer; and again that the Jews betrayed Jesus by spitting in his face.—(Loud laughter.) They were also informed that the temple was a large building in Jerusalem used in worshipping false gods (laughter) l that the'temple was also a building used by money changers, and that it had spikes on the top to keep the birds off,—(Roars of laughter.) Then another informed them that the Temple was generally used as a public-house, and by people who sold dogs.—(Laughter.) They were told that it was Judas who anointed Jesus at Bethany—(laughter)—and again that He was anointed by the wife of Simon the leper.—(Renewed laughter.) Referring to the Lord's Supper, one replied that seven loaves and three fisbea were divided at it—(laughter)—and that the Lord' 3 Supper was kept at the house of Simon the leper, When the question " What is the connection between the Passover and the Lord's Supper ?" was asked they were told that a jar of wine was left over from the Passover, and it was used afc the Lord's Supper.—(Loud laughter.) The speaker said he was not reading these laughable answers for the of causing laughter. These answers were certainly very laughable, but thoy were also the very opposite of a laughing matter. He read them out so that candidates might he cautioned from giving such answers next year. The Rev. E. Walker, who presided, referring to the Rev. Mr Sutherland's roimarlcß, reminded those present that in all examinations 'funny anßwera were received, but his idea was" that those.who made ridiculous answers such as they had just •heard did much better than those wbo; did 'not go in for the examinations at all.— ;(Atop]ause.V

Miss Doyle, daughter of Mrs Doyle, Nelson, fell down dead last night.

A conference of master tailors with the Executive of the Tailoresses' Union was held last evening, for the purpose of settling a "log" to be observed in the payment of hands employed in tailors' shops, Mr Sinclair occupied the chair. After lengthy discussion it was agreed to adjourn till the 24th inst.

Mr Coxhead exhibited his panorama of early Dunedin at the City Hall last evening to an audience of about 500 persons. A number of views of West Coast scenery were also shown, and some photographs of interesting places in the mining districts. At the conclusion of ths show a vote of thanks was passed to Mr Coxhead, who intimated that he proposes showing the views at short intervals during the ensuing summer. Besides those shown last evening he will exhibit the whole of the. touring districts of New Zealand and " Round the world with the_ camera," traversing America, the United Kingdom, Rome, and all Australasia. Most of our readers will remember the interest excited in Mr Milner Stephen's faith-healing meetings held a few yearß ago in Dunedin, and by somewhat similar meetings held later by the Rev. J. A. Dowie. Since the departure of the latter gentleman, a little company of believers have formed themselves into a society named " Holiness and Divine Healing Association," meeting every Monday evening in the Milton Hall, Stuart street. In addition to the meetings held for Bible searching, etc., active curative work or "divine healing" is undertaken by members of the society, and the results are made known at the quarterly meeting. Last eveningabout eighty persons sat down to tea, after which addresses were given by Mesßrs J. A. D. Adams, T. G. Dyson, and others, It was set forth that their belief existed largely upon the words found in James v., v. i 4 and 15 ; they did not believe that the age of miracle had passed away. The curing of the sick by tho church during the first three centuries of its history was without doubt, and where were they told of its finality? They believed that the body could be cured as well as the soul. In response to a request to those present who had been cured of bodily suffering by divine healing, about twenty-four of both sexos held up their hands, while several gave personal testimony of their recovery from illness during the past quarter.

Attention is called to an advertisement ohaupiag the date of the Hanover street Young Men's Society's concert. Mr Duncan Wright will begin an evangelistic mission at the North Dunedin Presbyterian Church on Sunday night, and continue it the whole of the week.

A publio meeting in connection with the Wesleyan home mission and church extension fond will be held in Trinity Church Hall tomorrow evening. Several addresses will be given setting forth the objects of the fund, and musical selections will be rendered by the choir. The fortnightly meeting of Leith lodge, 1.0.0. F., was held in Albany street Hall last evening ; G.T. Bro. Alexander occupying the chair. A letter of condolence was sent to P.G. Bro. Ogg in his bereavement. It is intended that a large meeting be arranged to celebrate the reopening of the lodge room. P.G. Bro. J, M. Wilson was elected chairman to the tnd of the year..' Messrs Scoullar and Chisholm have just completed to order a very handsome wardrobe made of mottled totara. It is 7ft Gin high and 7ft wide, and in respect to design and workmanship will compare with anything of the kind brought from foreign parts. Those who like to inapt) t such articles <un see the wardrobe in the window of the Kattray street warehouse. We have also had a peep at the unfinished work that will be shown by this firm at the Exhibition. It will not disgrace them. Maccabe did capital business at Timaru last night, is to appear at Oamaru to-night, and appears at the City Hall to-morrow night. The "only " Maccabe appears to"have lost noue of his vitality or versatility, and wherever he shows the Press and public alike speak very highly of him. An ex-Mayor of Melbourne writing to him on the merits of the entertainment says that Miss Minnia's dancing of Scotch dances was simply perfect, and that, though he had'judged at Caledonian gatherings for upwards of thirty years, he had seen nothing better.

" Lovers of athletic? will have an opportunity of witnessing the Association game of football on Saturday next at the Caledonian Ground, where o match will be played between teams representing the four Dunedin clubs and tho |£aitangat& Club. As the Litter club ha* already defeated two teams from Dunedin, it is ulear that they are capable players, and an exciting match on Saturday may confidently be expected. The Engineem' Band will bo in attendance as an additional attraction.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890917.2.9

Bibliographic details

The Evening Star. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1889., Issue 8014, 17 September 1889

Word Count
6,204

The Evening Star. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1889. Issue 8014, 17 September 1889

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