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THE LONDON STRIKES.

100,000 MEN OUT. THE DOCKMASIERS UNYIELDING. [By Emotbio Telbobaph.—Copitbiohib,] TSpecial to Press Association,] LONDON, August 31. (Received September 2, 18S9, at 10 a.m.) The police are reported to sympathise witb the dockmen, and it is believed that they cannot be relied on in case of riot. Burns expects to be arrested for the part he has played in the affair, and has arranged for a successor to replace him in the leadership of the Socialist party. Panic and riot are feared. It is expected that by Monday there will be a quarter of a million men out on strike. The dock owners show no signs of giving way. The utmost that they will agree to is to offer 5d per hour and promise to endeavor to pay for piecework at the rate of 6d per hour. The men insist on 6d for regular work. The number of men on strike outside the dock laborers has diminished, and it is now estimated to be not more than 100,000. The relief funds arc stated to be increasing, and amount to L 60.000. The Seamen's Union have offered monetary and active assistance. The wool sales will begin on the 17th inst, if the strikes do not prevent them being held. All the colonial brokers and merchants are suffering heavily. It is reckoned that L 2,000,000 worth of colonial imports and exports are blocked by this sudden revolt of the men. Two thousand East End sailors have struck for a decrease in their hours and for an increase in wages. It is expected that tho number will increase to 20,000.

[Peh Press Association.] THE STRIKE EXI ENDING. FAILURE OF EFFORTS AT MEDIATION. REPORTED SUFFERINGS AMONG FAMILIES. LONDON, September 1. (Received September 2, 1889, at 12.40 p m.) The mediators proposed that the laborers' wages should be 2s for four hours and 4s for nine hours, but were not listened to. The strikers are expected to receive vast additions to their ranks on Monday. The reports of women and children begging for food are reiterated. The paper mills are stopping for want of materials. It is hoped that the agreement between the shipowners and wharfingers to discharge vessels in the river may possibly terminate the strike, but rioting is feared. Enormous insurances have been effected. Thousands of men are flocking to Hyde Park. Cardinal Manning interceded, but without effect. Mr Buxton, M.P., appealed to the Government to intervene, but Mr Goschen declined. The Woolwich lightermen have struck, as also have 2,000 ironworkers at Keighley. The gas companies are short of coal, and getting anxious, LONDON, September 1. (Recolved September 2, 1889, at 12 80 p.m.) The strikers have withdrawn their general strike manifesto and issued an appeal for financial aid. It is rumored that the proprietors of the Albert Dock have agreed to the men's demands. The shipowners have applied to the companies for permission to engage their own laborers.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890902.2.18

Bibliographic details

THE LONDON STRIKES., Evening Star, Issue 8001, 2 September 1889

Word Count
488

THE LONDON STRIKES. Evening Star, Issue 8001, 2 September 1889

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