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The Evening Star SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1889.

The meeting of the Freetrado party in the House yesterday cannot be The I-ir.i'lcuro otherwise than beneficial in of Taxation, its results. The members of that party, or most of them, see very clearly, as they put it in their resolution, that in " tho present financial condition of the Colony the abolition of the Property Tax might involve a further increase of Customs duties." On this ground they came to the conclusion that it was not desirable that the Freetrade party should support the amendment of the member for Parnell (Mr Moss). It seems that Mrßarron was the only dissontient; but it will be recollected that he had framed a still-born amendment which could not find a seconder, and which went in the direction of a gradual reduction of the Property Tax. To this per se no one could possibly object. So of all other taxation, and when the millenium is authoritatively proclaimed by the Archangel Gabriel tho need of taxation may perhaps disappear ; but until that halcyon term arrives taxation of some sort will bo necessary. The difficulty is to levy taxation so that it shall press equally on all; or rather that it shall not press unequally on any. As a principle it should not be in the power of a "mediocre member of Parliament," as Mr Moss has been contemptuously termed without reproof by more than one member of the House, to disarrange tho finances of the Colony. What New Zealand needs, more than auything else, is political and financial rest for a time. We do not want our renovated creditable position in the world's estimation to be disturbed. The provisions in the Bill that have given rise to this sudden tumult arc intended to relieve certain persons from industrial taxation, Machinery in active use is to be untaxed, for instauce. Surely this is a step in the direction of encouraging industry and enterprise, und as such should command the sympathies of all and sundry who desire to encourage manufacturing industry. It grants relief to manufacturers, agriculturists, and miners, and all who aro engaged in prosecuting the industries of the Colony. Mr Barron's pro posal, as we are informed, only went the length of recommending the giadual reduction of the Property Tax. There is no objection to that; but, as President Lincoln onco said, it is unwise to "swop horses in mid-stream." The proper course is to put the Bill, a comparatively insignificant one, through, and thus prevent the chance of a change of Ministers and the general disturbance of tho country consequent 03i a general election. In committee tho Bill can be shaped after any reasonable fashion without endangering the existence of tho Government and incurring the risk of placing a MossBallanck Government in temporary power. We say "temporary," because no possible House would or could endure such a Ministerial combination for a single week. Nothing but confusion worse confounded could ever come of such a doubly disjointed Government; and, in the meantime, the mere fact of its ephemeral existence yvould bo injurious. Our credit at Home would he impaired, our debentures lowered in value, and our newlyachieved financial respectability destroyed. The probability of a frequent change of the incidence of taxation ia of itself an essential injury to the credit of the Colony, and heavy indeed is the responsibility which rests on the shoulders of the Ballance-Moss Opposition because of their present factious contention. We learn from our Parliamentary correspondent that as the debate progressed the majority for the Government waxed larger. We rejoice that this was so, because independently of the existence of the Government it is above all things most desirable

that thore should be some stability in our finance, Nothing short of this can secure for us a healthy position in the financial world, and nothing can be more reprehensible than the conduct of those who attempt to weaken or destroy it, as the Opposition are now, for mere party purposes, endoavoring to do,

Our supplement to-day contains extracts from a resent speech by the Irish Secretary, Who explains the effects of his policy of coercion in Ireland ; the first of a series of special articles on the Paris PJxhibition, from the pen of one of the ablest journalists in this colony; Table Talk; Feminine Fancies, by "Martha"; and a quantity of other interesting matter. The Caledonian Battery at the Thames was entered on Tuesday night and 40oz of amalgam stolen. The Government land at Wellington i 3 expected to realise i.40,000, but the returns are not complete. Ten thousand American brook char fry have been placed in the Hutt River thi3 season, and a like number in the branches of the Ruamahunga, in the Wairarapa district. Under a recent decision of the United States Treasury, New Zealand flax will henceforth be classed as sisal grasses, and tho American import duty will thus bo lodol per ton of 2,0001b instead of 20dol as heretofore. A young man named William E. Bannister, clerk in the post office at Auckland, was charged at the Police Court yesterday with issuing a money order for LlO with fraudulent intent at Wellington on the 2nd August, ISS7. Tho case was remanded till Monday. Four pure-bred Hampshire sheep, two being rams, arrived by the Crusader at Lyttelton yesterday, consigued to Mr Max Friedlander, Ashburton, in good condition, as during the rough weather they were quartered in the cabiD. They are quarantined for ninety days. In the House of Commons on August 1 Mr Thomas Sexton, M.P., moved the adjournment for the purpose of demanding the rescinding of the "vindictive and illegal sentence" of three mouths' imprisonment passed on Dr Tanner for having defied the Court. Tho motion for adjournment was negatived by a majority of 50 votes. A lad about six years old, named Shaw, was admitted into the hospital this afternoon. It appears that he was run over in King street by a tramcar. An examination showed that the wheel had passed over his left leg, tearing all the sinews at the lower part of the limb and breaking off a portion of one of the bones. The ankle joint is in a bad condition. Oliver Wendell Holmes has written to the author of a book entitled ' Burns and the Kirk ' the following characteristic sentence : —"I find it full of interest, for it treats on a question which has long puzzled me—how strait-laced Scotland could clasp her national poet to her bosom without breaking her stays." The old veteran has not lost his power of epigram yet! A recent number of ' Punch' is notable for many reasons. It consists of thirty-two pages (double the ordinary quantity), and includes a supplement, 'Mr Punch in Paris'; the price remaining the same, Mr Punch seems to have moved hia staff bodily over to the Pain Exhibition. They went over on tho 10th and returned on the 19th July, going to press on the 22ud with the results of their excursion. ' Punch in Paris' was actually done in I'aris. Nicholas of Montenegro, who governs his subjects in the old-fa3hioned paternal style, recently caused his Ministsr of Public Instruction, whom ho had convicted of stealing someStatearehives.to belaid actossablockin the couityard of the palace and publicly whipped, aud after the culprit had received fifty strokes with a birch rod, ho was packed off to prison for twelve months. Prince Nicholas holds a court every work, v/l.ea he dispenses justice, and offenders are then and there birched in the presence of his highness, who is, however, always ready to retiiit a certain number of blows for cash payment.—' Truth.' ' Jo ' attracted a satisfactory house to the Princcts's Theatre last evening, and, as on previous occasions, the wonderful acting of Baby Ogden in the titlo role elicited loud applause from the audience, who seemed to thoroughly enjoy the play. This afternoon a fairly well attended matinee performance was given, and tc-nyht a change of programme will bo made. A dramatised version of' Oliver Twist' will be presented, with Baby Ogden in the juvenile part; while Mr D'Orsay Ogden will make his firtt appearance here in the character of the Jew Fag in. A hundred thousand copies and more arc out of Cassell's 'Citizen Keider.' This is a littie manual for school children, designed to instruct them in the nature of citizenship. In the portion relative to the defences of the Empire is a sub-heading, "How Australia helped the Old Country," wherein the writer speaks most enthusiastically of the way in which New South Wales and Victoria came forward during the Soudanese trouble to help " the Old Country." The tone of the whole passage is excellent, and is well calculated to foster in the average English boy or girl a sympathetic admiration, as well as affection, for the Austral colonies. Besides, it is a sign of the times to find such passages included iu a popular book, expressly dosigned for the million. There was a short sitting of the City Police Court this morning. For drunkenness, Margaret Veitch (five previous convictions) was fined os, in default twenty-four hours' imprisonment, and Polly Smith (seven previous convictions), who came under the habitual drunkards clause! was fined 10s, with the usual alternative. There was a charge of vagrancy prefened against tho same accused, who pleaded guilty. Sergeantmajor Bevin described her as being one of I the worst characters in the City, and the Bench (disregarding her promises to " lead ; a better life, and go into tho Home ") sentenced her to one month's imprisonment, with hard labor, remarking that, if she really meant to reform, she could go into the Home when her term of imprisonment had expired. For being found drunk while in charge of a horse and dray Zenophon Bailey was fined 10s, in default forty eight hours' imprisonment. The presiding Justices were Messrs J. H. Morrison and Keith Kamsay. The Paris correspondent of the ' Voss'lche Zeitunc;' complains bitterly of the renewal of the pers .cution of German persons and German things which have followed the opening of the Exhibition. The " Deutchenhetze," it says, is led, if it has not been stirted, by the newspapers; and the Boulangist prints aro foremost in the crusade i against all that is " Prussian." At a wellknown French cci/d the landlord was so imprudent as to advertise the genuineness : and good quality of his Bavarian beer, hoping thereby to attract to his tables tho j German visitors to the Exhibition. He was fiercely attacked in the newspapers, accused of being a " traitor," and threatened with still further persecution. He was obliged to withdraw tho German beer from sale, as he found his house being forsaken by his French customers. The correspondent says it is hardly safe for a known German to show himself in public, and that even the German Ambassador and his suite were insulted with coarse cries when the President of the Republic accepted the invitation to Graf von Miinster's house. The ceremony of presenting diplomas to Canterbury graduates took place yesterday afternoon in Canterbury College Hall. The Chancellor of the University, Sir James Hector, presided, and made the presentations. The following diplomas were presented :—Master of Arts: O. T, J. Alpers, J. H. Smith, R. Speight, W. F. Ward, Aimeo Mills. Bachelor of Arts: W. T. Charlwood, J. Firth, F. G. Gibbs, J. A. Tripe, Betbia Jack, Catherine Lamb, J. M. Marshall, Mary J. M'Lean, J, H. Turner, D. A. Watt, T. S. Weston, Lillian H. Williams. Bachelor of Soience: R. M. Laing, M.A. Bachelor of Laws: Henrich Von Haast, M. A. Addresses were delivered by the Chancellor, Mr Justice Denniston, and Mr H. O. Forbes. The ceremony was noteworthy for the fact of the compromise entered into and carried into effect between the authorities and the students, the former agreeing to allow the latter to sing certain humorous songs, provided the serious portion of the programme was not interrupted. The students held to the bargain well, and gave Borne clever parodies and humorous songs in spirited style. The innovation was much approved.

The prevalence of typhoid In New York and Brooklyn during the present season has led Dr Cyrus Edson, of the local Board of Health, to make au exhaustive examination as to the origin of the disease in as many cases as possible. He found that the disease, in nearly one-half the caseß inquired into, was contracted in country resorts to which the victims had gone to find health. A notice to members of the P. A..F.S. appears in this issue. North Dunedin Rifles hold a social dance on Friday evening, August 23. The Palace Car Company have an adveriuement re coupons on our 3rd page.—[Advt ] The attention of members of Lodge Ivanhoo, U. 4. O. D , is directed to an advertisement iu th : s issue. The volunteer corps of the district will hold a church parade on the afto;noon of Sunday, August 25. Dunedin Engineers' fourth anniversary ball will be held in tin Garrison Hall on Friday, September 13. The foitnightly meeting of the Wcsi Harbor Lodge, U.0.D., was held in the lodge room, Queen's Hotel, Albany street, on Wednesday night, Bro, Campbell in the chair. There was a fair attendance of members, also the P.D. President Br o. Bryant, P.A. Bro, Carr, P.A. Bro. Moore, and several other visiting brethren. Bro. Larnach was appointed delegate for the dispensary, The 'Centennial Magazine' has now entered on the second year of its existence. Among other interesting papers in the current number are 'Western Australia,' by Sir T. Cockbarn Bart, M. L.C.; the Hon. James Inglis's readable account of a visit to some Indian jugglers; 'Utile Dulce,' dealing with acclimatisation matters; and 'Voices of the Night,' iu which the habits of some Australian birds are described. The fortnightly meeting of Court Enterprise, A.0.F., was held in the Court room, Carroll's Hotel, on Tuesday evening. The officers and members of Court Pride of the Leitli paid Court Enterprise a fraternal visit and were well received. Two new members were initiated. P.U.O.R. Bro, Williams responded on behalf of Court St. Andrew, C.R. Bro. Cole on behalf of Court Pride of the Leith, Bro. Ilubbard on behalf of Court Pride of Oamaru, PC.tf.s. Bro?. Youngman and Watson on behalf of Court Pride of Dunedin. A miscellaneous entertainment and coffee supper were given on Thursday evening in the King street Congregational Church to a very fair audience. Miss Kberhardt was heard to advantage in ' Calvary'; while Mr B. 0. Jones received an encore for his rendering of 'Yoa and J,' givi"g in response 'He was a careful man.' Mr T. Searle's contributions w?ro 'The vulture' and 'The pilot'; Mr W. Senlegave * The fisherman's child' in good style; Mr R. 0. Jones recited 'The jumping frog,'and Mr A. Wilkinson 'How we hunted the mouse.' During the evening the choir, under the baton of Mr R. 0. Jonea, contributed several selections, Miss Aitken aoting as accompanist.

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Star SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1889., Evening Star, Issue 7988, 17 August 1889

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2,489

The Evening Star SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1889. Evening Star, Issue 7988, 17 August 1889

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