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The Evening Star TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1889.

It looks as if we were in for a want-of-confidence debate of the Tho Attack orthodox kind, in which on the Pro- , ~ ~ pertyTnx. every member considers it his duty to the country to display the stock of statesmanship that is in him. Mr Moss's amendment to the Property Assessment Bill is thus quite a godsend to honorable gentlemen, who, as a rule, do not care to leave Wellington without contributing some substantial record of their wisdom to the commodious pages of 'Hansard.' It is thought the debate will go on for a week, and it may possibly drag its weary platitudes considerably longer. Mr Ballanck led the attack last night with a moderate, but not very remarkable, speech. Some of his statements, however, were amusing. He said that the improvement in the credit of the Colony was due to the fact that there were not so many people running it clown at Home as there had been for some years past. But this is the flimsiest ot all flimsy reasons forthis change. Does Ml* Ballanck imagine that our 'credit has risen merely because our revilers have grown tired of their malicious scribbling ? The Leader of the Opposition must have been hard pressed for depreciatory remarks w hen he resorted to such an absurdity. New Zealand is recovering her reputation solely because she has turned over a new leaf in the matter of administration, and the authorities of the London financial Press have changed the tone of their comments accordingly. Mr Ballanck was also tampering with probability when he said that a coalition between the Protectionists and Freetraders of New Zealand might eventually frame an ultra-protective tariff. If ever Freetraders coalesced with Protectionists for such a purpose, they would by tbat very act cease to be what they called themselves. Freetraders can never agree to ultra-protective Customs duties. It reads also like a piece of intentional pleasantry that Mr Ballanck complained of the Government for not supporting Mr Rkks in bis land settlement scheme. Had they no sins to answer for but this, their innocence would be unspotted. But Mr Ballanck affirmed it to bo a blot on the Ministerial policy that it had more sympathy with large settlement than small —a statement which Mr G. F. Richardson will do well to ponder. The Minister of Lands is one of the most capable of Sir Hauuy Atkinson's colleagues; but it is alleged that he is, by the natural bent of his mind, as well, perhaps, as by training and antecedents, more disposed to favor the squatter or largo landowner than the struggling farmer or the village settler. One reason, among many others, for keeping the Atkinson Government in office is suggested by Mr Ballance's advice with regard to public works: Find out, he said, the most useful lines (no very difficult matter, we should imagine, for a disinterested investigator), carry them to a paying point, and then, if necessary, come to the House with borrowing proposals to complete them. This advice was quite superfluous to a Government engaged in tapering oil" the expenditure on public works, and which had pledged the country to borrow no more till the year after next. But it is a pretty sure indication that a change of Government would be followed by a reversal of the present economising policy, and a return, as far as possible, to the old practice of heaping up debt for the sake of keeping things going. Tho fact that the reputation of the Colony is improving is a strong argument for continuing on the lines laid down two years ago. Every attempt to resume borrowing, except for specific objects and in comparatively small amounts, ought to be steadfastly resisted. This is the doctrine preached by Mr Saunders, who followed Mr Ballanck ; only he would allow borrowing for no reason or purpose whatever. He went the length of saying that if, in 1873, he could have injured the credit of the Colony to such an extent that not another shilling could have been borrowed, he would have been one of its greatest benefactors. This is, of course, going too far, though it is only too evident that New Zealand has both borrowed and spent money in a reckless manner. It is also plain enough, as Mr Saunders says, that further reductions could be made without injury to the public service, and that the proper management of the colonial finances is of the utmost importance. The Financial Statement is not at all to his mind, though it is one of the best ever delivered by a Colonial Treasurer. He had pondered it till tears almost came into his eyes, as he asked himself if there was any hope of our ever leaving off borrowing. We hope that Mr Saunders's speechifying will not take the character of a jeremiad, for nothing is more ineffectual for any rational end than political lamentation. But New Zealanders cannot bo too often reminded that borrowing is a matter that

requires to bo gone about with the greatest circumspection, and that a true and lasting prosperity c ui only be attained by reproductive industry and enterprise in developing the resource of the Colony.

Mr Glover is lecturing in Tasmania on Prohibition,

Nearly L1'2,000 has been left to Brisbane charities by Mr James Da vies, better known as "Daramboi," who died recently. The Queensland Parliament is to be asked to grant L 5.000 per annum as au endowment to the proposed university for that colony, The shipCatterthun, which has arrived at Brisbane from China, brings news that 12,000 rebels attacked the vilhge near Tukein, and killed over 4,000 men, women, and children, besides loot'ng property. Three thousand troops were sent out against the invaders, who vanished.

At a meeting of tho New South Wales Commission for the Melbourno Exhibition last week, the statement of the Finance Committee showed that the receipts from tlio Government amounted to Ll-4,000, and the expenditure to L 13.999 63 51. A further sum of L 730 will be required. One hundred and ten warships took part in tin British naval review at Spithead on the sth inst, in honor of the visit of the Emperor of Germany. The latter was eulogistic in his praise of tho review and the manner in which the various mameuvres were executed. The Queen personally inspected the fleet on board of the yacht Albert.

The Mr Murphy into the merits of whose torpedo the British Admiralty authorities are inquiring is Mr G. Read Murphy, Clerk of Courts at Wa 1 raambool (Victoria) for some time. He has been engaged for a number of years in perfecting his torpedo and a submarine torpedo boat, and recently went Home (on leave of absence) to bring his inventions before the Imperial authorities. The ' Oamaru Mail' says that in a speech lately Mr Fish got dreadfully mixed up in hia quotations. The country party, he said, were like Mark Tapley, " waiting for something to turn up." A roar of laughter led Mr Fish to believe that something was wrong, and aided by a friendly prompter, he made literary " confusion worse confounded 1 ' by explaining: "I mean the Mark Tapley who stated that Micawber was always ' waiting for something to turn up.' " This, of course, added to the merriment of the House,

At the sitting of the Victorian Presbyterian Assembly on the Gth inst., a unanimous vote of thanks was accorded Principal Riiny for the help he had given to the Jubilee movement. Dr Rainy, in replying, said the time was not far off when the Presbyterian Church of Australia, like America, would far outnumber and outweigh the Presbyterians of Scotland, and ho hoped that the controverting subjects would be removed, and the whole church in Australia united.

A cablegram has been sent by Sir H. Atkinson to the Premiers of the other colonies, stating that Professor Sydney Dickenson has been specially engaged by the New Zealand Government to deliver a course of lectures on New Zealand in the Australian colonies, to draw attention to the picturesque features of the country, and encourage travel to it during the approaching Exhibition, The Premier requests the Governments of the colonies to afford Professor Dickenson and his assistant free transport over the railways, and any other assistance in their power to grant. The Governments of Victoria and Tasmania have complied with Sir Harry's request. The following telegrams have passed between Sir E. Stout and the Government re Agnews : —" Dunedin, August 10. Hon. T. W. Hislop, Colonial Secretary, Welling ton.—Have seen Agnews. They are without clothes or bedding. Could you not make sum L 25, otherwise doubtful if they go.—Rouert Stout." "To Hon. Sir R. Stout, Dunedin,—Government consider Agnews have no claim on country, therefore cannot agree to further advance. They think it a case for private subscription, and will individually contribute something if subscription started.—T. W. Hislop." The monthly meeting of the Athenwmn Committee last evening was attended by Messrs J. G. Moody (in tho chair), J. R. Sinclair, J. A. Barr, W. S. Fitzgerald, J. H. Chapman, D. Reid, jun., E. E. Morrison, W. M. Bolt, D. White, W. M'Adam, W. B. Harlow, and Dr Colquhoun. The reports of the sub-committees on the management of the institute and sundry repairs required were approved. The thanks of tho Committee were accorded to the Hon. T. Fergus, M.H.R., for obtaining for the institute a complete set of White's ' Ancient History of the Maori'; to Mr Edward Faulds for presentation of volume of ' Nine Years in Nipon,' written by his brother, Henry Faulds, L.F.P.S. ; and to Mr John Blair for a copy of his work 'Lays of the Old Identities.' The Union Steam Ship Company presented a ' Handbook of Information of the Colonies and India.'

A good story (says the ' Oamaru Mail') is told of the late Mr Justice Gillies. He and a well-known barrister went on a fishing excursion one afternoon, and shortly after reaching an excellent ground for bites, the lovely waters of the Waitemata became disturbed, not to say "lumpy." The Judge became terribly sick, but his companion was a veritable old sea dog, and having made himself as comfortable as circumstances would permit, proceeded to chaff his companion, while he hauled to the surface several interesting piscatorial specimens. All sorts of law phraseology were introduced, but although they were excruciatingly funny, and rally included something about " throwing up the brief," or "moving for an adjournment," the Judge never smiled, until at last the barrister's conscienco smote him and he asked: "Can I do anything for you? Just suggest what you wish." And then, as the boat gave another fearful lurch, the Judge replied : " I wish you would move that this motion be overruled."

A lady correspondent, writing in the ' World ' a description of a visit to Pentonville, thus refers to a person well known in Australia :—" As we enter another long gallery of cells the warder whispers to me : ' The first cell on the left.' The door, like all the cell doors, has been thrown open, and inside, facing us, tall, erect, her head thrown back, Bta.ncla a. most beautiful woman. The Btrong light from the window falls on a mass of dark golden hair, which seems to rebel openly against the white prison cap. The face, with its bright, dark eyes, is somewhat in shadow; and as she stands thero in the white cell she looks like some wild falcon that has been trapped and caged for a timo only, and who, as soon as she regain her liberty, will know how to use her strong pinions, as well as her beak and talons, just as well as ever she did. And it may be said that she has used them, for this beautiful creature is none other than the notorious Mrs Gordon Baillie, whose brilliant career of fraud came to an abrupt conclusion some months ago, when she was sentenced to five years' imprisonment by a hard-hearted Judge who had evidently no feeling for beauty." There was a bumper house at the Princess's Theatre last evening, when a complimentary benefit was tendered by Mr C. Hugo to the Dunedin City Fire Brigade. A procession, headed by the Ordnance Band, and consisting of members of tho City Fire Brigade, under Superintendent Robertson : Dunedin Naval Artillery, under Chief P.O. Donaldson ; Port Chalmers Brigade, under Captain Mitchell; South Dunedin Brigade, under Captain Osborne; Dunedin Salvage Corps, under Superintendent Jacobs; Northeast Valley Brigade, under Captain Ivemy—assembled at the Octagon, and marched to the Theatre, outside of which the band played several selections in excellent style. The performance was, although varied, not so good as previous ones, but was the means of causing considerable merriment, and of sending the audience away in a good humor. This evening a benefit will be tendered to Miss Priscella Verne and Mr Charles Hugo, and as thoy have become universal favorites it goes without saying that a crowded house will be present to do them honor and give them a suitable send-off. The Ordnance Bind and several amateurs have proffered their services, and a " monster bill " is announced.

Twelve bank clerks, belonging to Christchurch, have scaled Mount Hutfc, 7,180 ft high. Consul C. W. Griffen was offered preferment during his recent visit to his na'ive land, but decided to resume charge of the U.S. consulate at Sydney. William Thompson, ex-manager of the Colonial Bank of Victoria at Yarragleo, has been sentenced to five years' hard labor for embezzling 1,2,625 of the bank's funds. Two hundred acres of land in Raglan district have been purchased by two vignerocs from Southern France. They intend to commence grape growing and wine making. Captain Henry Richards, of Queenstown, who levanted in company with the daughter of a loeal blacksmith, named Aldridge, has been arrested in Tasmania on a charge of wife desertion.

Admiral Fairfax, having been appointed Socond Naval Lord of the Admiralty, leaves for England next month. The name of his successor in the command of the Australian station has not been announced.

Tho greater part of the town of North Willonghby (New South Wales), which has been built upon for many years, has been claimed by a Mr Nicholls, who has served ejectment noticos upon the residents.

We learn that Principal Rainy will not arrive in Dunedin until the end of the week. He is to preaoh in First Church and Knox Church next Sunday, and lecture in Knox Church on the following Wednesday. A review and inspection of the New South Wales troops took place at Moor Park on July 27. It was the largest that has been recorded in the colony, if not in Australia, the field state showing a total of 3,577. The Port Chalmers Borough Council have resolved to procure the written opinion of the borough solicitor as to the power of the Council to remove namo3 from or add to the burgess roll for tho year after it had been formally accepted by the Council and duly signed. A destructive gale prevailed at Te Aroha (Auckland) on Saturday night and Sunday. The balcony of tho Club Hotel was blown away, and the exterior of the hotel damaged. The Oddfellows' Hall was wrecked, as was also the house of a settler ; whilst another house was great'y damaged. At Sydney last week Signor Florinda Castillano, who is said to be a nephew of Signor Crispi, the Italian Premier, recovered LI,OOO damages from the Grosvenor Hotel Company, who had sued him for L 49, tho amount of his hotel bill. He paid L 35 into Court, and put in a counter claim for L 2,000 damages for wrongful arrest on a writ of capias. A crowded public meeting at Hokitikaj called to protest against the proposals of the Government re the HokitikaGrey Railway, decided to ask the Government if they will hand Over the line and money allocated to the residents of the districts concerned, who will find the balanco required to complete it; or if the Government will invite tenders for its immediate completion, the balanje of tho money being loaned at 0 per cent. It is stated that either could be Carried into effect locally; Western examples aro beginning to have effect in Japan. The ancient Japanese custom of Hari-Kari, or Happy Despatch, has received a set-back. For centuries it has been tho custom for officials of high rank, who may have offended their sovereign, to disembowel themselves upon intimation from tho M ikado. Not long ago, an old and trusted official wounded the feelings of tho monarch, and the next day an officer brought him tho fatal sword, a magnificent weapon encrusted with rare jewels. Tho culprit received the sword, packed his valuables, and took the steamer for Havre, en route to Paris, where ho sold tho Bword of honor for L 6,000. A member of a financial firm in Sydney, who was given to huge speculation, and who is now wanted by sorrowing friends, has taken away with him no less than L 35.000 in hard cash. There are also overdrafts at several banks amounting to about L 45.000, making LBO.OOO in all. He came there rather obscurely a very short while ago, and, it is said, by reason of letters from England and representations that his wife was heiress to a large fortune, obtained almost unlimited credit from the banks. Ho went into all sorts of speculations, and played his cards so cleverly that it is doubtful even if he can be arrested and brought back. H9 only victimised the large financial firms.

Mr Frank Lincoln, the American humorist, opens his New Zealand tour at Wellington and then does the North Island, reaching Dunedin about the beginning of December under engagement to the Exhibition Commissioners. Mr T. J. Lohr has control of his business arrangements. Of Mr Lincoln it has been written that "he seemingly enjoys his work just as much as his audience. This is his chiefest charm. Everything seems to come spontaneously, bubbling up like a fresh, clear stream, and the ease and rapidity with which he changes voice, feature, and expression are truly marvellous. He is a born humorist, the best mimic seen for many a day." At the City Police Court this morning, before Messrs W. Isaac and W. Hutchison, J. Pa Chief-detective Henderson applied for and was granted an order to bring up Robert Gardner, at present undergoing sentence at Dunedin gaol for larceny, at the City Police Court, on a charge of stealing a quantity of wool, the property of William Gatfield, of Burnside. For keeping an unregistered dog in his possession William Barry (one previous conviction) was fined 2i 6d, with costs. Charges of a similar nature against Richard Miles, George King, Alexander Martin, Robert Fletcher, George Rowlands, and Henry Box were dismissed. Charles Paterson, who did not appear, but who had registered the dog since the summons was issued, was fined Is, without cost?.

The otlier day, says a Melbourne paper, a unique deputation waited upon Mr Dow, tho Victorian Minister for Lands. It consisted of Thomas Dunolly, one of tho aboriginals from the Coranderrak aborigine station. Tho blacks had heard that thero was some idea of turning the station into a dairy farm school, and sent in a petition against it, of which the following is the substance : " White fellows ought to leave us alone. White fellows would not like us to come down and see you, Mr Dow, to take their land from them and move them out of their homes. We are in a Christian land, and we ought to love one another with brotherly love. Please, Mr Dow, don't break our homes from us till we are dead and gone. We won't be very long in this world. We are, your most obedient servants." This would be funny but for tho pathos of helplessness in it. It is touching to see the last remnant of the raco who a few years ago were sole lords of tho Victorian soil pleading for enough of it to live on until they become quite extinct, and making a conciliatory promise not to be long in this world ; and it is pleasing to note that Mr Dow promised that nothing would be done without consulting tho b'acks on the station. Mr Arthur Garner (of Meibourne) has secured the services of Miss Achurch, an emotional actress of the Sarah Bernhardt school. She has been making a great success recently in London, and will bo accompxnied by Mr Charring ton, an excellent character actor. Mr Garner has also engaged the Walton family of pantomimists and burlesque artists. His trump card, however, is Mr J. L. Toole, who leaves England in February, and opens in Melbourne at Easter. He will play his usual repertoire: ' Tho Don,' 'Paul Pry,' 'Upper Crust,' 'Artful Cards,' ' Off the Line,' * Dearer than Life,' and his own farces. Six or eight members of Mr Toole's London Company come with him. Mary Anderson had accepted Garner's terms when she took ill. She is well now, but her constitution being undermined by overwork, she requires a long rest. Wilson Barrett and Miss Eastlake may come to Australia on the termination of their American tour next June. Mr Garner met Sarah Bernhardt at Cairo, and broached the subject of a visit to Australia. She was quite willing to come, but, unfortunately, her engagements are booked till 1891, when Mr Garner has every hope that Australia will sec tho great Parisian actress. When Mr Irving was asked if he would visit Australia he said he thought Australians wouldn't pay sufficient to recompense him for coming, but Mr Garner offered to guarantce him as much ub he can make olacwhere. The matter was left open.

Michasl Morgan and James Anderson were yesterday committed for trial at Oamaru on a charge of burglariously entering the shop of Eodger and Crerar.

Renter confirms in some measure the cablegram received at Auckland in the early part of last week. The damage done by the fire at Spokane Falls, Washington Territory, is estimated at 10,000,000d01, but no lives were lost.

An emergency me.Hing of the District Grand Lodge, E.U., will be held on Thursday evening, at Cargiil road, South Dunodin. The usual fortnightly meeting of the Loyal Piiucc of Wales Lodge will be held at Port Chalmers to-morrow evening. Mr H. B. Smith has taken in hand the getting up of a concert in aid of the family of K. Hi 1, a painter in distressed ciroumstanceß A capital programme will be provided, and some of our principal amateurs will take part in it.

The Broad Bay Mutual Improvement Sooioty gave a concert in the school there on Friday evening, Mr R. Huie (president) in tho chair. Ihe first part of the programme consisted of readings, recitations, and songs, tho performers being Misses Anderson, Qwynne, Green (2), Mosif, M'Lauchlan, Kaeburn, Baynbird, Messrs Anderson, Huie, Green, Leith, Nightingale, and Seaton. The second part was the farce 'Box and Cox,' tho parts being filled by Misj Anderson and Messrs G. Anderson and Nightingale. To-morrow night the Baby Ogden ' Jo' Company opens at tho Princess's Theatre in Dickens's great story of 'Bleak House,' in which Baby Ogden takes the title role of Jo, tho street waif. The northern papers speak very highly of the performance of this child, who has not yet attained hor sixth year. Wo are icformed that this will be the last opportunity tho Duticdin public will have of witnessing her performance previous to her leaving the stage for some years. The opening performance will be under the patronage of the Mayor of Dunedin.

The penny readings in the Mission Hall, Walker street, continue with unabated success, Ordinarily, the programme consists of readings, recitations, and different kinds of music, rendered by various ladies and gentlemen and the young people connected with the hall and district. Last week, however, something new was added, half the evening being occupied by Mr Hare, an amateur ventriloquist, who kept the audience thoroughly amused and interested. Yesterday evening was devoted to a chemistry lecture by Mr Ewing, and this proved the greatest draw of the series. The sum of 17s 5d was taken in coppers, which bespeaks a good attendance. Mr Ewing went through his experiments without a single chcc'c, and the exposition was thoroughly enjoyed. These ontertainmenfs are much appreciated by the people in the district, and are serving a very good end indeed,

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Star TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1889., Issue 7984, 13 August 1889

Word Count
4,079

The Evening Star TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1889. Issue 7984, 13 August 1889

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