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THE TRIANGLE.

TO THE EDITOR. Sir, —As it appears that the expense of fencing the Triangle has hitherto been the obstacle in the way of converting it into an object of amenity, I would recommend that it should not be fenced at all. When I left the Old Country, over thirty years ago, George Square, in Glasgow—a reserve a little larger than the Triangle, in which stand several monuments, one being of Sir John Moore, of Corunna fame—was enclosed with a high cast-iron fence, and none but favored persons, who were supplied with keys for the doors, had access to the interior. On visiting Glasgow threo years ago, I found the fence gone, the reserve laid out in flower-beds of various shapes, bordered with box and other edgings, and intersected at various angles by asphalt walks, A few seats are placed at the intersection of the walks, and, although thousands and tens of thousands daily and nightly pass and repass, J was informed that seldom are the flowers touched by a sacrilegious hand. Groups of persons are seen at all hours of the day stopping in their walk to admire the flowers. I may add that the Queen's Park in the same city is laid out in a similar manner, and is open to the public. Public taste in the Home Country has greatly changed in respect to the utilising of public reserves, and the fencing of them is lcoked upon as savoring of the barbarous.—lam, etc., C,A. Dunedin, August 13.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890813.2.37.3

Bibliographic details

THE TRIANGLE., Issue 7984, 13 August 1889

Word Count
251

THE TRIANGLE. Issue 7984, 13 August 1889

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