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"CHARITY."

TO THE EDITOR. Sir, of the boy John Edmonds, who had the misfortune to have bis arm torn off while being employed at the rope works, South Dunedin, a few days ago, I beg to offer a suggestion which might be worthy of consideration—viz,, that a special accident fund be raised for the benefit of those who have the misfortune to lose an arm or a leg, or any other disablement that would incapacitate them from earning a livelihood. The fund to be contributed to principally by the owners and masters of large works, where there is a lot of machinery constantly at work, greatly to the endangerment of those who work in such places. 1 Fortunately there are not many accidents like the above, therefore the fund would grow into a very considerable amount in time, and when an accident did occur wherebv a man lost an arm or a leg he could be taken in hand soon after recovery and educated for some light employment, so as be could earn an honest living without being a burden oh fife parents and others, and ultimately depending on the State. In the majority of cases the parents of boys who work in such places arc, comparatively speaking, poor,

and cannot afford to sciiool them so as to fit them for anything else. In many oases the parents, ai e depending on the boy’s earnings, and I think it is a disgrace that something should not be done in the way of compensation, either to take the injured one in hand and see to his future prosperity or give a substantial donation to the parents to do so. Charity considers the terrible exigencies of life into which many are born, and in looking at the above lamentable case something ought to be done at once to ameliorate their condition. If the fund is once started by the owners of those places they will soon find plenty of sympathetic friends to contribute their mite to such a charitable cause ; and I have no doubt if the students attending the hospital for practice were waited on they would be generous enough to give a small amount each towards it, as such accidents afford them great facilities for advancing in their studies. Sir, there is also another sad case I would like to mention. It is of a young named Murphy, residing in Green Island, who lost his arm a few years ago while being employed at the ropeworks, and his parents being rather poor could not do anything for him in the way of fitting him for some other kind of employment; consequently he has been almost dependent on them ever since. He has bad a few odd jobs occasionally given as an act of charity, hut quite inadequate for his own maintenanc?. It is very sad to think that a boy injured like the above while working for his employer should be cast abroad in the world to fight the battle of life the best way he can, with one arm, without trying to do something for him. I sincerely hope that some of the millowners will take the matter up and have the fund started at once.—-I am, etc., Monte Christo. Dunedin, August 5.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890806.2.39.9

Bibliographic details

"CHARITY.", Evening Star, Issue 7978, 6 August 1889

Word Count
544

"CHARITY." Evening Star, Issue 7978, 6 August 1889

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