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FOUND DEAD.

An inquest was held this afternoon, at the Supreme Court Hotel, Stuart street, before Mr Coroner Carew and a juiyof six, of whom Archibald M'Master was chosen foreman, touching the death of Patrick M'Ledowney. Sarah M'Ledowney, wife of deceased, said that she had been living in Dunedin for three years. Her husband came from Waipori a week last Saturday. The body shown to the jury was that of her late husband. He was born in County Londonderry, had been in New Zealand over twenty four years, was a blacksmith hy trade, and had carried on business at Waipori ever since their marriage. She last saw him alive at about six o’clock on Saturday evening. It was in King street. Witness asked him to come home. He said “Will you take me home ?” Witness said she would, and he went with herpartof the way until they got to a crowd, where witness missed him. She tried to find him, but could not, and then went home, thinking that he might have reached the house before her. He was not there when she got there. He had been drinking hard before leaving Waipori, but was all right when she last saw him and was able to walk steady. He had no valuables with him. He was not a man to fret; ho had nothing on his mind. Witness had about nine years’ since applied for a prohibition order in respect to him. Thomas King, a lad employed at Hudson's confectionery works, said that yesterday morning he and his brother were going along the reclaimed ground, and while looking in the water they saw the body of a man lying on its back alongside the wharf at the foot of Stuart street. Witness reported the matter to the police, The body was in about 3ft of water. Constable Glocsoa gave evidence as to the appearance of the body. It was fully dressed with the exception of the hat, which was afterwards found in the mud. Witness searched the body after taking it to the hotel, but found no valuables. The tide was out at 7 p.m. on Saturday. The wharf was about 10ft high from the level of the mud which formed the surface of the shore at that point. There were some kerosene tins in the mud, but no stones bo far as witness saw.

Philip M'Ledowney, son of deceased, last saw his father alive at twenty minutes to eight on Saturday morning. He was sober then.

Sergeant Green said that he had known deceased for the last ten or eleven years. He was very subject to drink. When drunk he was very quiet. He was a strongminded man, and did not seem to suffer much from the effects of drink.

Dr Coughtrcy had made an outward examination of the body, and found no wounds or signs of foul play. There had been a fracture of the second bone of the neck, which was quite sufficient to account for death, independent of tho immersion of the body in water. The body presented more the appearance of death from pressure upon the spinal cord than of death by drowning. The immersion was subsequent to death. A fall from the wharf at low tide at the spot where the body was found would, witness would think, be sufficient to account for the injury sustained by deceased, who was a heavy man of about fifteen or sixteen stone.

The jury returned a verdict of “ Pound dead,”

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890729.2.11

Bibliographic details

FOUND DEAD., Evening Star, Issue 7971, 29 July 1889

Word Count
583

FOUND DEAD. Evening Star, Issue 7971, 29 July 1889

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