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THe GREAT POISONING CASE

IMPORTANT DISCOVERIES CONCERNING MRS MAYiiRICK.

VERDICT OF THE CORONER'S JURY

[From Our Steciae Correspondent.]

London, June 7. That the Maybrick poisoning case has developed into a cause celcbre of first magnitude was made abundantly evident when the local Coroner's Court reopened proceedings en Wednesday morning, as upwards of eighty duly authorised pressmen put in an appearance. The big dailies sent special reporters, the illustrated journals artists, and the medical weeklies experts on poisoning ; besides which there were correspondents and " liners " galore. The operation of getting various witnesses who had, it appeared, met Mrs Maybrick passing as Alfred Brierley's wife in Loudon waß conducted in private. The Liverpool 'Post' says:—"But the great event of the day—the appearance in open court of the accused lady—did not come off, to the acute regret of the artists, who had made preparations to specially sketch her; and to the infinite disappointment of the public, whose curiosity to see her had been increased by the air of mystery which has hitherto surrounded her movements. Contrary to expectation, she was not brought before the coroner. She was spared that inconvenience for the time being. What was done was this. During the adjournment for luncheon those witneß»es from London who were required to identify her privately saw her in the anteroom, whither she had been conveyed from Walton Gaol shortly after the proceedings commenced. Subsequently a magistrate was sent for, and on the arrival of Mr Holbrook Gaskdl, jun., J.P., shortly before three o'clock, arrangements were made to again remand her pending the result of tho inquest. When the small party—consisting of Mr Gaskell, Mr Swift (senior magistrate's clerk, Inspector Baxendale, and one reporter entered the apartment, Mrs Maybrick, in charge of Sergeant Hodson, and attended by Dr O'Hagan and a Miss Foster, had just finished luncheon. She was very neatly attired in a mourning Russian cloak, with two broad bandß of crape running down the front. A coquettish net veil just reached to the tip of her nose, while the long widow's one hung gracefully behind, falling on what a lady described as a ' nicely tiltedup tournure.' Delicate lawn 'weepers' adorned her dark sleeves, and her pale but interesting faco was set off with a dainty little bonnet, Beneath this head-dress and covering the greater part of her brow was a carefully curled fringe, which considerably enhanced her personal charms. Her hair was also worn at the back in the shape of a fringe, and altogether she presented a by no means unattractive appearance Her figure is petite, and seen in the full lLdit het complexion is much fairer than when one observed her in the gloomy precincts of Walton Prison. She has wavy brown hair, and her features are what some of her sex would be inclined to describe as more piquant than classically regular. Perfectly calm and collected, she listened to the terrible charge against her as once more recited by Inspector Baxendale, and apparently the recital did not disturb in the slightest her mental equilibrium. She looked in good health, and there was a wholesome color in her cheeks which was observable for the first time since her incarceration."

Describing the scene in Court the same authority says :—"Here, conspicuousaniorg the gaily-dressed ladies, might bo singled out Nurse Yapp (the impounder of the celebrated letter addressed by Mrs Majhvick to Mr A. Brierley); Bessie Biierley (no relation to Mr Brierley), the waitress at Battlecrease House, and another natty servant of that unfortunate vienaye. Broadly before the public eye, too, was Mr Davies, the analyst (who was hovering round, and occasionally diving into, a big tin box containing all sorts of curiously labelled jars and bottles that made one shiver to think of); Br Carter, who sat profound and immutable, affording by his marked individuality capital pabulum for the pictorial artist; and Mr Michael Maybrick ('Stephen Adams'), whose stalwart form and bronzed features gave him a military rather than a musical appearance. _ In a remote corner was seated Mr William Maybrick, commission agent, of Liscard, the eldest brother of the deceased. This gentleman attended the Court for the first time, and, like hi 3 three brothers, Mr Michael, Mr Edwin, and Mr Thomas Maybrick (the latter from Manchester), was deeply iinpreesed with the grave nature of the proceedings. Almost the entire floor of the room was appropriated to the jury, reporters, barristers, solicitors, and police authorities; and a background of spectators filling up the space near the door completed the coup d'«>.'d. The half-hid, diminutive gallery perched over the entrance or vestibule was packed by a serried phalanx ol persons, mostly women, who craned their necks and made ' dexter-boards' of their hands in order to catch every bit of the dialogue in the moving drama that was beiDg slowly unfolded below. Mr A. Brierley, whose name has been mixed up with that of Mrs MayJ brick in a somewhat notorious manner, took up a position on the coroner's left, actually within a few feet of the ante-room where the unfortunate prisoner was concealed from the prying eyes of a curious and eager audience. He was wedged in between Mr A. J. Dalzell aud another gentleman, and during the whole of the day he never once communicated with his counsel, Mr Mulholland. If one may judge from outword appearances, then assuredly he felt exceedingly uncomfortable in being the object of such painful attention ; aud it was only natural under the trying circumstances that he should now aud then avert his face to foil the bketohers who were drawing him for a purpose with which he could hardly be expected to be in sympathy. He certainly had to pass through a crucial ordeal towards the close of the day's business, when the perky London waiter identified him as the ' party ' that passed the week-end with Mrs Maybrick in a private hotel. ' Do you see in Court tho man who stayed with the lady?' asked Mr Superintendent Bryning in his most tranquil and dulcet tones. The witness hereupon stood up; raised himself to his full height (about. sft lOin), and pointing his finger at Mr Brierley, exclaimed in a voice which rang through the building: 'To tie best of my belief, it is that gentleman there.' This was the most exciting incident of the day, exceeding in intensity the episode of the finding of arsenic in the meat extract—a species of nourishment with which Mr Maybrick was generally served at homo. The action of the waiter-witness seemed to be needlessly melodramatic, and it undoubtedly heightened the thrilling effect produced. A situation like this must have proved peculiarly unpleasant to the gentleman who was brought suddenly into so fierco a light ; and his flushed face and abashed expression bore eloquent testimony to the state of his feelings. The occurrence was followed by that indescribable noise which, for want of a better meaning, is termed a ' sensation,' and a few of the more excited onlookers indulged in hisses—a demonstration that was at once sternly repressed." Tho chief part of the evidence was medical, and much what all anticipated. Arthur Richard Hooper, physican and surgeon, was not more intimate with Mr and Mrs Maybrick than with ordinary patients. Ab their medical adviser ho had occasion at times to visit their house at Battlecrcase. He always thought they lived happily together until March 30. On that date Mrs Maybrick called at his house, and she had a bl«.ck eye. She told him she wished to have a separation from her husband. He told her to cast the thought away. She said she had had a serious quityel the Dight before with her husband. On tha rcme afternoon witness went out to Battleprease to ace the children, and while there' Mrs Maybrick came into th« room where he was, and when they were talking Mr Maybrick came in. Mrs Maybrick then left tlie ' roojm. sie came in again at witness's

suggestion. When she came in again they began to talk about what had happened the night before. Mr May brick had asked him to'efl'ect a reconciliation if possible. At first she appeared to be quite unwilling to be reconciled, but what appeared to be a perfect reconciliation was effected. While the conversation was going on Mrs May brick said she felt some repugnance towards her husband. The subject was the quarrel about the Grand National. A gentleman was mentioned, but not by name. Witness understood thai a gentleman was the subject of the Grand National quarrel. Witness caPod next day at .Mr May brick's request, and he saw Iwt'h Mr and Mrs Maybrick at the hoiiM\ This was on the Ist April. They first spoke about Mrs Maybrick's illness and secondly about her debts. The subject of her debts had been introduced by her at the previous interview, and they recurred to the same topic. Mr Bryning asked whether Mrs Maybrick told witness her total indebtedness.

Mr Pickford thought this was going rather far. There wus a dispute between the husband and wife about her debts, but the amount of the debts could not be material.

In reply to the Coroner, Dr Hooper said the conversation led him to believe Mrs Maybrick was in debt, but Mr Maybrick was willing to pay everything. Witness, in continuation, said they had several interviews, but the name of no person was mentioned, though a gentleman was frequently referred to. He left them perfectly reconciled.

Mr Bryning a?ked if Mrs Maybrick said anything about flirting with a gent'eman, but Mr Pickford objected to the question, and Mr Mulholland suggested that the gentleman should be allowed to tell them with his own words if there was anything hanging on the question.

Witness said he did not at all attend the deceased in his laßt illness. That was entirely in the hands of Dr Carter and Dr Humphreys. Witness had attended deceased for several years since 1881, and from time to time he was a little out of sorts, suffering from functional derangement of the liver. He complained also of a certain set of nervous symptoms. Witness prescribed nux vomica and strychnine as nerve tonics. Deceased was a man who was in tho habit of taking all kinds of medicine, whether ordered by tho doctor or other people, taking almost anything that was recommended to him by his friends, and of the medicines ordered by medical men he often said he had taken a double dose. Arsenic was a nerve tonic, like nux vomica and strychnine. Deceased told witness that he took arsenic as an anti-periodic wnen he lived in America in 1882. On that occasion Mrs Maybrick had spoken to him about this habit of her husband taking all kinds of things, and had asked witness to Bpeak to him about it. This was in the latter part of 1888. Previous to tho fatal illnesa of the deceased witness was at tho house on two or three occasions, He called frequently to see the children when they had the whooping cough, but he was not called in to see tho deceased.

By Mr Pickford: He never had any reason to suppose that the reconciliation he had effected had broken down at all. Mr Maybrick called on him in Princes read, and said they were very happy. By tho Coroner: He never proscribed arsenic for the deceased that he remembered. Nerve tonic would be more useful than arsenic.

By the Foreman: Witness knew the gentleman spoken of because of a letter from the Baroness Roque, which alluded to aMr B. Mr Maybrick suggested to witness that that was the man his wife had been flirting with at the Grand National.

The two doctors who attended the deceased described at great length his illness and their treatment, told of the arousing of suspicious, the impounding of bottles and beef-tea (in some of which one of them found arsenic), and the result of the post ■mortem. Mr Maybrick had died from arsenic poisoning. Neither doctor had any doubt of that.

An hotelkeeper in Cavendish square then produced letters from Mrs Maybrick in March last, ordering rooms for herself and her husband, who were coining to stay some days, Alfred Schweiger, head waiter at the private hotel kept by the last witness, said that on the 21st of March last a lady named Mrs Maybrick arrived at 1.30. He had seen that lady to-day, and recognised her. (At the suggestion of the Coroner, the witness was here conducted into the ante-room by Inspector Baxtndale, and on returning into Court said he had again seen the lady.) He had no doubt about her. She was amongst other ladies. She engaged a diningroom and a bedroom adjoining. Later in the day, at 0.30, a young gentleman called and took her out to dinner. He had gone to bed when they returned. Next morning lie found Mrs Maybrick had been joined by a gentleman, who was her husband as far as witness knew. They stayed at the hotel as man and wife, from Thursday the 21st until Sunday the 24th. They occupied the same bedroom. The young gentleman with whom she had gone out called again on the following day. The Coroner : Can you identify the gentleman who stayed with Mrs Maybrick?— W itness: Yes.

Do you see him in Court ?—The witness here ro3e, ami pointed to Mr A. Bricrlcy, who occupied a scat in the Court, and said : " Yc3; to tl.e beat of my belief, he is there." Witness, continuing, stated that they left together about ten minutes to one on tho Sunday. The notices in the memorandum book produced were his. By Mr Mulholland: A gentleman called on the Thursday night who was not the same as the one who was with her afterwards. The first gentleman took her out to the theatre, and called to inquire about her the next morning, but she was out. The second gentleman he first saw on the Friday morning at breakfast.

Then came a very important witness a lady, and a so-called friend of the prisoner's. Mrs Israel Briggs stated that she lived in Livingstone avenue, Aigburth, and was on intimate terms with both Mr and Mrs Maybrick, and was accustomed to visit at their house. On Saturday, March 30, the day following the Grand National, Mrs Maybrick came to the house of witness in the morning in great distress, and told her she had had a quarrel with her luuband, and was very anxious to have a separation. Witness dissuaded her as much as possible, and she and Mrs Maybriek went to Dr Hoffers. Mrs Maybrick went to the General Post Office to get a private box of her own, explaining that she wanted to receive her mother's letters. The following day (Sunday) witness went to Battlecrease, and saw both Mr and Mra Maybrick. They both spoke about the recent unpleasantness. Mrs Maybrick said she was very much in debt. Witness stayed there four or five days ; and, so far as she could judge, they had made up the quarrel, and were reconciled. On Wednesday, May 8, witness went to Battlecrease. Something was said to her by Nurse Yapp, upon which she went upstairs into Mr Maybrick's bedroom. Mrs Maybrick followed immediately after, and was apparently annoyed at her disturbing him. He tried to tell her his symptoms, but Mrs Maybrick said she would tell her the symptoms in five minutes. Witness suggested having a nurse, and went downStairs, when Mr 3 Maybrick said there was no occasion for a nurse, and that the doctor thought so. Witness nevertheless telegraphed to the Nurses' Institution, Dover street, and wired also to Mr Michael Maybrick in London, and then went to Liverpool to communicate with Mr Edwin Maybriok. Witness was present at the death of Mr Maybrick. On tho following day (Sunday), the 12th, she and the two brothers searched for some keys, and in doing so the letters now produced were found, but not by herself. On the 14th witness saw Mrs Maybrick writing a letter, which she handed to witness.

Did you give it to the police ?—Yes, but I warned her first the letter would be Been by the police. The Coroner read the letter, stating that it was written in pencil, and addressed to A. Brierley,Esq.,GO Huskisson street, Liverpool, and was as follows :

I am writing to you to give me every assistance in your power in liny present fearful trouble. I am in custody without any of my family with me at present, and without money. I have cabled to my solicitor at New York to come to me at once. In the meantime svnd some money for present needs. The truth is known about my yieit tb London. Your last

letter is nt present in the bands of the police. Appearance!) are teuibly against me, but befoic God I swear I am innocent.—Fi.okk.sce E. MayHJUCK,

Witness added that she did hand the letter to the police, and it never got into the possession of Mr Brierley. She was present when tho box (produced) was found, It contained a bottle of Valentine's meat extract and some other bottles. It was found in a bat-box in tho dressing room. Mr Michael Maybrick was present when she found it. It wits found during the search for the keys. Mr May brick told her to put them buck in the box, which she did, and they were afterwards given to Inspector Baxendulc, l:i another hit-box in the dressing room she found the tumbler produced, which contained at the bottom some greyish fluid, and tho sides of which were discolored. There was a rag in it. Tho hat-boxes were on the floor of the dressing room, with the lids on but not concealed. (The hat-boxes spoken to by the witness wero here produced, and wore found not to be hat-boxes, as usually known, but bandboxes, on<) of them containing a gentleman's silk hat.) Witness and Mr Michael Maybrick searched the dressing table. A small phial (produced) was found. This also contained a greyish fluid. Thiß was in the bedroom itself in which the deceased died.

By Mr Pickford : The deceased himself used the dressing room only occasionally, and that for sleeping. On those occasions Mrs Maybrick occupied the bedroom, When Mrs Maybrick was writing to Mr Brierley the letter read, witness might have said that he (Brierley) might send her money. Witness knew Mrs Maybrick wanted money for telegrams and other matters.

Did you tell her that you were going to hand that letter to the police ?—Certainly. Beforo she wrote the letter ?—Yes, I told her to telegraph, not to write. The Coroner : And you say that she wrote that letter knowing that as soon as sho had done so it would be given to the police ?—Certainly. There was a policeman at the door. I said she was to write nothing they did not see. Replying further to Mr Pickford, the witness said there were a groat many medicine bottles about the house, and sho knew the {deceased was in the habit of taking a great quantity of medicine—things suggested by friends, as well as prescribed by doctors. By Mr Steele : My expectation in regard to tho writing of the letter was that the police might see it or take a copy of it before it was sent on to Mr Brierley. By the Foreman : When Mrs Maybrick interposed and said she would tell witness tho deceased's symptoms in live minutes, the deceased was quite able to speak.

VERDICT OV WIM'l'L MURDER. The first witness on Thursday was Mr Edwin Maybrick, younger brother of the deceased, from whose evidence it transpired that the first breath of suspicion with regard to Mrs Maybrick came from Mrs Briggs. Edwin Maybrick also deposed to the rinding of all sorts of bottles and of the famous box of arsenic, and to taking down his brother somo revaknta Arabka to tho office, which Mrs M. gave him, and which made deceased very sick. The first real interest arose when Mr Davies, the analyst, was called. Mr Davies is a business-liko little gentleman with steel-grey hair and a slight beard, and wearing spectacles. When he took his place at the end of the table he surrounded himself with a number of bottles, blue and white, and with cigar boxes containing linen handkerchiefs, bottles, and other articles, He was questioned by the coroner, and gave his evidence as to the analysis in the most straightforward and clear manner, taking care to explain the meaning of certain terms. Mr Davies was so learned, and his phials were so numerous, as to irresistibly suggest the modern " apothecary," and altogether a romantic, if not Shakspeariau, flavor was lent to the episodes following by the production of the poisoned handkerchiefs. Mr Davie3 proved beyond all question the presence of arsenic in the meat-juice bottle which a former witness (the nurse) deposed that Mrs Maybrick had temporarily removed from the bedroom. He also proved the prosenco of arsenic in tho small bottle found under the hat, and in the small lady's handkerchief marked " Maybrick " he found arsenic. Out of this handkerchief, which he held up, he had cut a small piece, and out of this piece ho had abstracted arsenic. Out of another handkerchief, exactly similar in hemming and size and appearance, he had obtained a large quantity of arsenic. Then came tho reason for the calling of Messrs Clay and Abraham's assistant, who had made up two prescriptions of a London physician, Dr Fuller. These were two medicines the ingredients of which he fully described. The one was to be taken three times a day, and this Mr Maybrick took to his office. The other medicine, to be taken once a day, he took home, and tho bottle was found in the lavatory. It still contained a few drops of the medicine, and these, Mr Davies said, contained arsenic. The dregs of the medicine in the other bottle at the office were free from arsenic. Then came tho further evidence as to the packet labelled "Arsenic—for poisoning cats " —a small package similar in Bize and shape to a packet of Seidlitz powders—and various small phials were said to contain solutions of the poison, which, as someone remarked, appeared to be "all over the house." To summarise here the articles in which arsenic was found chiefly there wero(l)thß

meat juice bottlo which is said to have been taken out of the room by Mrs Maybricli ; (2) the lady's handkerchief found in the cupboard of a fancy table wrapped round a bottle; (3) three bottles—one full of arsenic—found among other bottles in a small wooden box; (4) the glass and the part of a second handkerchief found under the hat in the bandbox; (5) the sealed packet labelled "Poison for cats"; (6) the flypapers ; (7) the brown jug that had contained the luncheon ; (8) a bottle containing glycerine found in the lavatory. _ Then ccme the statements iw to the examination of the intC3tiuos and other portions of tho remains, which were produced in large glass jars, and spoken of as " ounces," with a curious incongruity and indiiference bred possibly of familiarity. At no period of the day were the listeners aroused from tho lethargy and torpor enforced by the dull scientific recital until the conclusion of the evidence of Mr Davies, when the following letter, which had been found by Mrs Hughes in Mrs Maybrick's dressing table drawer, in the very room where the death took place, was read by the coroner :

"My Dear Florrie,—l suppose, now you have gone, I am safe in writing to you. I don't quite understand what you mean in your last about explaining my line of action, You know I could not write, and was willing to meet you, although it would have been very dangerous. Most certainly your telegram yesterday was a staggerer, and it looks as if the result was certain ; but as yet I cannot find an advertisement in any London paper. I should like to see you, but at present dare not move, and we had better perhaps not meet until late in the autumn. I am going to try and get away in about a fortnight. I think I shall take a round trip to the Mediterranean, which will tako six or eight weeks, unless you wish me to stay in England. Supposing the rooms are found, I think both you and I would be better away, as the men's memory would be doubted after three months. I will write and tell you when I go. I cannot trußt myself at present to write about my foelingß on this unhappy business, but I do hopo that sometime hence I shall be able to show you that I do not quite deserve the strictures contained in your two last letters. I went to the D. and D., and of course, heard some tiles, but myself knew nothing about anything. And now, dear, good-bye, hoping wo shall meet in the autumn. I will write to you about sending letters before I go.— A.8."

Here the whole of the gathering which now had largely increased—eagerly lent forward and listened with an intensity so great that every syllable of the coroner's words could be heard all over the big room. A disappointed murmur, however, followed the letter, for it was thought

there was little in it of a complicatory character.

After this the interest in the proceedings continued to increase. Many cabs drove up, and some scores of ladies and gentlemen pressed into the room and crowded round the tables. The coroner's summing-up was a model of impartiality, but every one of the strong points was luridly brought out Tho verdict was unanimous on the part of thirteen of the jurymen out of fourteen that Mrs Maybrick had wilfully murdered her husband. Who tho dissentient juryman was did not transpire, and Mr Bowring, who was on the jury, got up after most of the people concerned had left the Court, and said he hoped the name of tho juryman who dissented would not be given. As soon as the verdict of tho jury, which was declared in the most emphatic manner by the foreman (Mr Fletcher Rogers), became known, the Coroner said "Send for Mrs Maybrick." For two minutes there was a hush of anxiety and curiosity, and everyone gathered closer and closer around the tables, and looked eagerly towards the door of the littlo library through which the accused lady must come. At length Inspector Baxendale, followed by a huge sergeant, came through the door, and they were immediately followed by the petite figure of Mrs Maybrick, covered with crape from head to foot. The only part visible from under the thick veil was the BquareBet and determined • looking chin; but it could be seen, even through the thick veil, that the face was ghastly pale, and that there was a gleam and an anger in the eyes, as there was a stubborn and even daring defiance in the bearing and the demeanor. When the coroner tola her that she would be committed for trial for the wilful murder of her husband there was the slightest inclination of the head—a movement so freezingly polite as to suggest sarcasm at the formality ; and then the lady turned on her heel, and, followed very closely by a little female attendant and two very stalwart policemen, who looked ab. surdly out of proportion to the fragile figure they had to guard, she rapidly left the room through the library door. She was driven for a few minutes back to the Garston Bridewell, and then taken to the lookup at Lark lane, where Ehe is now under the charge of Sergeant Hodson and several other members of the county force.

LATER DETAILS. MRS MAYBRICKIN THE DOCK. EXTRAORDINARY~BEHAVIOUR OF ACCUSED. | By Our Special Correspondent in Court.] The following description of the scene in tlis Liverpool Court'lnraßS has bWwuifcTßf

by a correspondent resident in that city. The excitement aroused by the case amongst the fashionable c'rcles who live in the suburb where the Maybricks had their house is, lie states, painfully intense, for the husband and wife were well known, and entertained freely. Both were popular, but the unfortunate gentleman was specially so, and had been, before he married, one of the most sought after men in town for bachelor dinner parties and the like. Writing befoie the inquiry was concluded, and the prisoner committed, on Thursday night, our correspondent, says :-- Another instance of tbo consideration with which Mrs Maybrick is being treated by the police and the'oilicials was shown on Tuesday, when she was brought before the magistrates at the County Sossions-house, in Liverpool, formally charged with murdering her husband. It was surmised from the extraordinary amount of interest evinced by Liverpudlians in the inquiry that an enormous crowd would gather to witness her arrival at the Court at ten o'clock, when the case was timed to come on, and the supposition proved correct. Long before nine a crowd of many thousands had assembled in the great open space in front of the Court, and by the hour appointed one had to fight one's way to the entrance gate through an excited mass of people, the like of which has not been seen in Liverpool since the Queen went to open the Exhibition there in the jubilee year. What sort of reception the lady would have received bad she been driven through the crowd it is impossible to say, but the police had, as I say, foreseen the matter; and shortly after proceedings had commenced inside it was made known that the public would have no sight of the lady, as she was already in the dock, having been removed from Garston in a private carriage to the court-house at five o'clock that morning. With loud murmurs of disgust the crowd broke up, though a good number remained about all day on the chance of seeing someone connected with the case.

Once inside the Court the scene was sufficiently impressive. It was crammed with pressmen, witnesses, and a few favored individuals who obtained entrance by ticket. At about a minute to ten the magistrates, three in number, took their seats on the bench, and the Court became so silent that the proverbial pin might have been heard drop. Tho hush was broken by the discordant gong of the Court clock striking the hour. In the middle of the slow measured strokes Mrs Maybrick, tastefully and fashionably dressed in mourning, walked sharply up the steps into the dock. She was heavily veiled, but one could just see the outline of her prominent nose and determined chin through tho crepe. She stood for a moment behind the comfortable padded chair placed in the dock for her oomfort, and took a leisurely survey of the Court, In fact, she had not halffinished her look round when a rather pretty female warder touched her lightly on the shoulder and whispered her to be seated. With a slight nod the lady walked slowly round and sank with a bored air into the chair. She rested her head against its baok, and for a second or two stared fixedly through her veil at the principal magistrate, who appeared to feel bashful under the scrutiny and coughed uneasily. Then, as Superintendent Bryning began his terribly clear report by charging her with coldblooded murder, Bhe cast her eyes down and began arranging her dress to her complete satisfaction and comfort. She spread it out, crossed her knees, and unloosened a black feather boa about her neck in a way that had something uncanny about it when one realised her position, During the day, while the whole of the damning circumstantial evidence given at the inquest was repeated, she appeared thoroughly uninterested and utterly bored. She yawned incessantly, and got up with surprising alacrity when the Court adjourned, first for lunch and then for the day. Next day the same programme was repeated, with the exception that by order of the magistrates the gong of tie clock had been removed, and the lady entered the dock in complete silence. This time she was not only callouß but distinctly coquettish, and several times glanced with an amused smile at the busy Press men and the " copy " boy, who kept the Court in a perpetual state of movement and whispering, 'I he reason for the utterly unprecedented way in which she is taking the whole of the now very serious business would appear to be that she expects to present the world with a young Maybrick',?) in about six months' time. In this case, even if conviction followed, of course she would not be hanged. The Court was most unpleasantly warm, and several times in the afternoon the fair prisoner turned petulantly to her warder and appeared to be asking for something, which turned out to be a fan. She is evidently a woman of the type Miss Braddon so ably describes in the character of Lady Audley, who can faoe any amount of trouble in future as long as her bodily comforts in the present are not interfered with. Going out of Court in the afternoon of the first day she spoke to some female friends who manifested a desire to kiss her. For the first time Bhe appeared surprised, and perhaps a little moved. She hesitatod a moment, and then bent down and kissed the forehead of the woman, who was much agitated. Then, with a distinct duck of her head to the Bench, a nod to the reporters, and a flick of her hand to her friends, she dived down the steps of the dock clofely followed by the female attendant. The inquiry up to the present has been tedious in tho extreme, and if nothing new turns up to-morrow, the facts of the case, as far as the public are concerned, will remain aa they were at the coroner's inquest.

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Bibliographic details

THe GREAT POISONING CASE, Evening Star, Issue 7970, 27 July 1889, Supplement

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THe GREAT POISONING CASE Evening Star, Issue 7970, 27 July 1889, Supplement

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