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THE KAIWARRA MURDER.

[Per United Press Association.] WELLINGTON, July 13. The following further correspondence in regard to the case of Louis Chemis has taken place : Wellington, July 17,1989 (.11 p.m.) Sir,-I received your letter of to-day 8 date, at noon, and as you intimated thit " no objection would be offered to my seeing the prisoner under proper restrictions " I immediately sent my managing clerk to the gaol to inquire from the prisoner, in the presence of the gaoler or warders, tho names of any witnesses he desired me to interview, and also to communioate to him the contents rt your reply. I am informed that my olerk was not allowod to hold any communication with the prisoner, and whon the Supremo Court roso, about 4.50, I imm:diatoly drove to tho gaol to interview Chemis within the terras of your letter. I arrived at 55, and was rsoeived by Warder Milllngton, who said he had striot instructions from the gaoler not to allow me to soo fie pilaoner without his (tho gaoler's) order. Millington at once went in search of the gaoler, and nturned and said that aprie9t (Fathur ulahoney, f think he named) had shortly before left Chemis, and he supposed the gaoler had walked down tho road with hira, and would return directly. I therefore waited until about 5.25, and whilst Btandlng outside the gaoler's houso with Warder Millington, Mr Guvey came from his private garden with tho Roman C aholio priest, where tbey had evident y been conversing together. 1 then renewed my application to see the prisoner. Mr Garvey replied that "I could not do so without an order." I inquired from whom, and he said the Minister of Justice. I referred him to your letter, and he said he had received no directions. I asked whether au order from anyone else would suffice, and ho eaid "No." After some difficulty and delay I succeeded in getting you at the telephone, and I now repsat what I then said to you: "Jellicoe is speaking from the Terracs Gaol. Notwithstanding your letter of to-day, I am refused an interview with Chemis without the production of an order. Mr Oarvey is standing alongside the telephone. Will you he good enough to give him the necessary authority ?" You replied : " You must prooure an order from a visiting Justice." I replied that "MrOarvey said ha would not aot upon any order unless it came from you," ind you then said you would not give me one until I had seen you, and that I could see you af cer eight o'clock at Parliament Buildings. I then asked Mr G trvey to give the prisoner from me a copy of your letter. This, he said, should not be done, inasmuch as it contained the statement that an inquiry was to be held into his conduct; but ultimately he consented to take him a memorandum, whioh I wrote, inquiring the names of his witnesses; and this was answered by a memo., whioh was brought to me, in -the handwriting of Warder Millington. You were awaro that I had an appointment to examine witnesses nt Kaiwarra at soven o'clook, and on my return I oalled at the Parliament Buildings as arranged. That was at 9.35. My card was taken in to you, and the answer I recoived was that you had charge of some Bill then before Parliament, and could not come out. I again sent a message to you, diawiDg special attention to tho seriousness of any delay, and that if you could not see ir.c you oould at least give me the necessary order for the <uoler. The answer returned was that you would see me at ten o'clock to-morrow, and that ym would not do so before, and ultimately t succeeded in getting an appointment for 9.30 to-morrow morning. I am asking at your hands jUßtice for the prisoner and I confess that at present I am uraWe to understand the treatment lam receiving. You say that " strict Inquiry shall be made into the allegations against the gaoler." Ido not know whit this me ins; but what I have asked for, and now demand on behalf of my unfortunate client, is such a full and exhaustive public inquiry as the circumstances of the case demand.—l hive, etc., E G. Jklucob. The Hon. the Minister of Justice, Wellington. Wellington, July 18,1889 Sir,— Be Louis Chemis, I regret having Again to protest against the manner in which my applications on behalf of the prisoner are being dealt with. I attended the appointment at your oltlci this morning, and, after waiting until seven minutes to ten, I was informed by your secretary, Mr Waldegrave, that you would not be down at tho office for some time, and that as I only required an order for an interview with Chemis, ho was instructed to give it me. He then wrote out and handed me a document, whereof the following is a copy :-"l*risori depigment, July 18, 'S9. The Gaoler 11. M. Prison, Wellington,—Please allow Mr Jellicoe to see the prisoner Louis Chemis. —J. E. Richardson, lospeotor of Prisonß." Mr Waldegrave also said thit you declined to give a goneral order, and that what he had given me was good for to-day only, hut if I applied for another order at any time he thought there would be no difficulty in letting me have it.—l have, '' E. G. Jkllicob. Tho Hon. the Minister of Justice. (Received 1.30 p.m.) New Zealand Department of Justice, Wellington. Wellington, 18th July, 1889. Sir —I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of tha 17th hist., and in reply am directed by the Minister cf Justice to inform jou that he ovnnot admit the eorreotnesi of tho circumstances as stated by you therein. To prevcut any further misunderstanding as to what may have taken place upon any particular occasion, the Minister desires me to request that any pommunioation you may have to make to him may be made in writing.—l have, etc., F. Waldeqrayb. E. G. Jellicoe, Esq., solicitor, Wellington.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890719.2.27

Bibliographic details

THE KAIWARRA MURDER., Evening Star, Issue 7963, 19 July 1889

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1,012

THE KAIWARRA MURDER. Evening Star, Issue 7963, 19 July 1889

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