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YESTERDAY'S CABLES.

Home and Foreign. Mr T. A. Dickson, M.P. for St. Stephen's Green, is dead. Canon Doyle and twenty-two of his parishioners are being tried at Arthurtown, County Wexford, on a charge of promoting the Plan of Campaign. The C.ou.r<i is guarded by 100 police and military.

Mr W. H. Smith, in consonance with his previous announcement, moved in the House of Commons yesterday for the appointment of a committee to oonsider the principle on which allowances should be voted to members of the Royal Family. He was supported by Mr Gladstone's section of the House.

O'Connor, the Canadian souller, has arrived at Queenstown, and, like Searle, expresses himself confident of victory. The Standing Committee on the Trußt Funds Bill has rejected the inclusion of colonial securities amongst those in which such funds may be legally invested. The Home Government are not thought likely to seek to disturb the decision this session.

New Zealand frozen mutton in the London market is at 6Jd; lamb B£d. Beef is unchanged. The present stock of mutton on hand amounts to 70,000 carcasses. M. Tuesney De Beaurepaire, public prosecutor, who succeeded M. Bouchoz when the latter declined to prosecute General Boulanger, has also refused to undertake the tisk, and sent in his resignation. M. Freycinet has refused to court-martial the general, and a Ministerial crisis is expected. Germany has denounced the Swiss settlement treaty of 1876. The Berlin 'Post' states that the delegates who represented Great Britain at the Samoan Conference will remain for a while to discuss subjects relating to the common sphere of England and Germany's influence in the Pacific.

Further particulars of the engagement at Wady Haifa show that many Dervishes were killed while trying to reach the wells, which were secured by Colonel VVodenhouße's troops, thus cutting the Dervishes off from water, and, as a consequence, numbers of them perished of thirst. None of the victims of the terrible calamity at St. Etienne Colliery have been rescued. President Carnot is taking measures for the relief of the widows and families of the dead, whose number is stated at 200.

Davitt, continuing his evidence before ' The Times '-Parnell Commission yesterday, said he knew that Widow Walsh allowed her son to be executed for the murder of Constable Cavanagh rather than disclose the name of tho real murderer. He strongly condemned much that had appeared in the columns of the ' Irish World.' Personally he regarded the murder of Lord Frederick Cavendish as a most atrocious crime, and he declared that he would have cheerfully sacrificed himself to save that gentleman's life. If he had been able to raise sufficient arms he would have risked his life to resist the Boydyke evictions. He asserted that it was he who induced Ford, of the 'lrish World,' to abandon the dynamite policy.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890706.2.27

Bibliographic details

YESTERDAY'S CABLES., Evening Star, Issue 7952, 6 July 1889

Word Count
468

YESTERDAY'S CABLES. Evening Star, Issue 7952, 6 July 1889

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