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The Evening Star THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 1889.

The meeting of the Maori Hill Council to havo been held last night lapsed for want of a quorum.

The Agnews have been sent to prison for a month on a charge of having insufficient means of support.

The Resident Magistrate's Court case of Thomson, Bridget', and Co. v. J. Caldcr stands adjourned until to-morrow. Mr Arthur Ormsby, who at one time represented Timaru in the Provincial Council, died veiy suddenly at Christchurch on Sunday afternoon. Deceased, who was a barrister, was fifty-two years of age.

The first train from Palmerston to Dunedin was this morning detained owing to the axle of the engino breaking when in the neighborhood of Merton. The 7.45 from Dunedin to Oamaru was in consequence delayed for about an hour. This and the stoppage of the train that had the mishap were the only interferences with the traffic.

In an address to the landowners and farmers of Great Britain with regarl to "The effect upon Agriculture of Commercial 'Rings,' 'Trusts,' 'Syndicates,'" etc, the Council of the Agricultural and Horticultural Association of Deptford points out that a " ring " of manufacturers of superpliosphato of lime ha 3 forced tho wholesale price from 37)3 or 37s Gd to not less than 46s Gd per ton ; that another London combination has secured an advance of from 103 to 20s per ton on ground bones; and a third has pushed up tho cost of nitrate of soda to Lll to Lll 10s per ton from L 0 5s or 1.9 103 at the same period last year, OLher articles similarly affected are linseed and linseed cakes, cotton seed, and cotton cakes. The maize "ring" luckily came to_ grief. Agriculturalists are asked to combine for their own defence.

A curious case of " marriage by surprise," as recorded by the Madrid correspondent of the ' Daily News,' who, telegraphing on the 18th April, says:—"An extraordinary occurrence has taken place in one of the principal churches of Madrid, in the pariah of Santa Cruz. A priest had nearly finished his mass, and was in the act of pronouncing the sacramental words lit mimt cat, when u, younc man, aged twenty-one, and a beautiful ° s ii I wf twenty, suddenly approached the altar railing with three middle-aged men, and the young couple cried aloud ' We wiiih to be husband and wife. Hero are our three witnesses.' Now, it seems that under the canonical laws still regulating marriages in Spain Roman Catholics can thus claim to be considered married by surprise if they are nkilful enough to do so just after the priest has uttered the benediction at the close oi maBS. Formerly this stratagem was, as in the present case, resorted to by young people whose parents opposed their union, When this occurred in the Church of Santa Cruz 11 scene of confusion ensued. The priest retired to the sacristy, and sent for the police, who conducted tho offenders arid witnesses into tho presence of the Municipal Judge. He declared the marriage valid, much to the delight of tho young couple, and the intenso disgust of the parents of both sides, who had resisted the union." At a recent meeting of farmers at lloruham (Victoria) the following resolutions were unanimously carried :—" That having heard the intention of the Government to delay tho imposition of an increased duty on nil cerealo coming into the colony until December next, thia meeting considers this action to be a breach of faith with tho farmers of this colony, and that tho secretary of the Farmers' Association bo requested to communicate with the Hon. Walter Madden, member for Horsham, and request him to lay the views of the meeting before the Premier, and to use influence to have the increased duty imposed at the earliest possible |moment." " That this meeting protests in the strongest possible manner against the Government allowing any cereals to be landed under any pretence whatever without payiog duty, no drawback to be allowed under any circumstances." "That the hon. secretary be requested to write to the Hon. W. Madden, setting forth the views of this meeting, and that he be requested to organise a deputation of country members in the House to wait on the Premier, and urge that gentleman at the earliest possible moment to increase the duty on cereals from 2s to 3i per cental, with the view of preventing our local markets being glutted with foreign grain ; and also that the secretary write to all country members in Parliament, asking their co-operation in this important matter ; and, further, that all tire other societies in the district be requested to cooperate with the Bociety." An illustrated work on the forest flora of New Zealand, from the pen of Professor Kirk, F.L.S., late Chief Conservator of State Forests, and Lecturer on National Science at Wellington College, and the School of Agriculture, Lincoln, has (says the ' Post') just boen issued from the Government Printing Office. It is in two bizes—post folio and foolscap—aud contains :145 pages. Tho preparation of a descriptive account of the economic trees and shrubs comprised in the New Zealand flora was authorised by the late Minister of Lands (Mr Balance) and confirmed by his successor (Mr G. F. Richardson).. The primary objects of the work are to diffuse a knowledge of tho forest resources of the oolony—to describe the chief methods of working and conversion employed, and to establish a uniform system of common namea. The plan of the work may be briefly siated. A separate account ia given of each species—the head lines stating the separate name, tho Maorj name, or in some cases a common name, which may be substituted with advantage; also the name of the natural order to which the plant belongs, with a reference to the plate on which it is represented. The first portion of the text contains historical information and other particulars of general interest conneoted with the plant, an account of its dimensions, habit of growth, etc., and a more or less detailed statement of the structure of the fruit and flower devoid of techniealitfcc. This is followed by a concise account of Jto properties and uses, and in the cases of the more important kinds the mode of working the forest, commercial value, etc. A brief statement is givep £* the dis.trifcifciop of the genus, and a more account of tha distribution of thespelctes. The article is completed by a botanical description o,f the spepiea and an explanation of the plate,

' It ia said that Sir Charleß Rußsell will conduct the Napier appeal case on behalf of Mr Broughton, Sb. John's, S.C., of Timaru.have declared aguiDst the formation of a Masonic Grand Lodge at the present time. Two cases in which leading Dunedin brewery firms are charged with defrauding the Customs will shortly occupy the attention of the Resident Magistrate.

The polling for the Christchurch North election resulted a-j follows: E. W. Humphries 403, John Ollivitr 378, Eden George 181; informal 7, destroyed 1, Mr Humphries supports the Government.

A meeting of the Committee appointed recently in connection with the Tailoresses' Union was held last night, when a satisfactory " log " was passed for shirt machinists, finishers, and pressors, which will be laid before manufacturers.

News by the Southern Cross states that Weaver, the supercargo of the schooner Colonist, who is charged with the murder of Captain Greenless, is still in Suva awaiting his trial, which is to be held when Sir J. B. Thurston arrives from Samoa.

At the Port Chalmers Police Court this morning, beforo J. R. Monson and J. Morgan, J.P.9., George Cowan was charged with assaulting Margaret Wisden on the 15th inst. After hearing the evidence, their Worships dismissed the case. At a conference of the Oamaru school committees it was decided to direct the attention of the Otago Education Board to the fact that it has been stated that the practice of keeping children in school after regular hours prevails pretty generally throughout Otago, and to suggest that, if such be the case, the Board should issue a general circular upon the subject to all committees.

The Chancellor of the Diocese of Winchester (England) has given the following opinion as to tho use of the burial office at funerals by cremation :—" In my view the service may properly be read after cremation, as old Christian services for the dead might be over the ashes of martyrs who had been burnt, at the time of burying the ashes, but I think it should not be the prelude to the cremation."

The Riverton • Star' has the following : Colloquy heard at Riverton railway station last week. Britisher, to one of the principals in the mining appeal heard at District Court. " Well, Wong •, you lost case.'' Wong : " Losum casee ! too much gammon. They tell'um me, shift'nm peg win'um casee. Shift'um peg ! Losum casee. They tell'iim me catchee Chapman ! Catchee Chapman ! ! Catchee Chapman !! ! Chapman catchee forty pounds."—Exeunt. If Lord Lonsdale may be believed, he has discovered a waterfall which beats Niagara, and over which huge icebergs go sailing to fall headlong into the abyss which boils below. This is the story which lie ha 3 brought from Alaska. The Hay River cataract dashes over a prscipice 200 feet high at a point where the river is a mile and a-half wide. Tho fall of the Niagara is about IGO feet, and tho breadth of the stream just beforo taking the plunge is less than a mile, so that even without the icebergs the now Niagara of Alaska will take the first place among the waterfalls of the work'.

In referring to the San Francisco mail service, Mr J. W. Ward (momber for Awarua) pointed out to his constituents that tho following five Australasian colonies had a weekly mail service with Europe for L 15.000 a year each viz , New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Western Australia, and Tasmania. The total cost of that splendid service was L 170.000, of which the Imperial Government paid L 93,000, leaving L 75.000 to be made up by tho five participators named. This colony, on the other hand, paid L59.G09 for a bi-monthly service.

A civil action, resulting from un accident which occurred on the s.s. Wairarupa on tho Kith of September last, is to be tried here. Henry Eversfield, a commercial traveller, seeks to recover LI,OOO damages from the Union Steam Ship Company for injuries to his leaf through the breaking of a winch on board the s.s. Wairarapa as she was being huuled alongside the Lyttelton wharf on the date mentioned. Tho plaintiff was a saloon passenger on his way from Melbourne to Napier, and in consequence of the injuries which ho sustained it is alleged that ho wan obliged to remain in tho Wolliugton Hospital for five months, and will never be able to have the proper use of the limb again. Tho evidence of Drs fell and Hasseil has been taken on commission at Wellington.

Mi' Herbert Gladstone has been interviewed, as p-esident of the National Physical Recreation Society. Asked what physical recreation did his father take, he answered : '' He used to be chiefly fond of rowing, riding, and shooting, but during the last twenty or twenty-five yeare he has bad to give up thoßo fonn3 of exercise, and, an is well known, to confine himself mainly to cutting down trees, which he does habitually. He always was a great walker, and not more than fiftcn years ago he walked thirty-five miles over the hills in Scotland. In my opinion, lie is still good for a twenty mile tramp. He always attached tho greatest importance to physical recreations, and he lost no opportunity of encouraging U3 in them. Ho has proved their benefits, and I think is not a bad specimen of their value." The mjsical organisations of Christchurch are trying to get up a big festival in view of Mr Santley's visit. The following is the basis of the. proposed arrangement:—"A working committee of twelve to be ap pointed, three from each of the following societies: the Liedertafel, the Orchestral Society, the Motet Society, and the Christcliurch Musical Society ; that a committee of guarantors against loes on such festival be appointed ; that such joint committee decide upon the number of concerts to be given, tho time and place and conditions thereof; that the combination be called the Christchurch Musical Festival ; that the net profits (if any) bo devoted to charitable purposes in Christchundi, divisible as the Committee shall decide." From the enthu siastic manner in which the project has been taken up, and the list of names forming the guarantee, there is every prospect of the affair being brought to a successful issue.

"ho Dunedin Gun Club meet for pigeon fchooting at Taliuna Paik on h'a'uvday afternoon.

The case of Wilson, Taine, and Co. v. the Bank of New Zealand was continued at the Supreme Ci'iut to-day. Counsel were engaged during the whole sitting in addressing the Court.

A sacrel concert was given in tho South Dunedin WealeyAn Church last (veiling by a number of ladiis and gentlemen well k-jowu in musical circles. Rev. G. W. J. Sper.ce presided. Owing to the weather there was a rather meagre attendance. The programme comprised anthem i, holoh, duets, and Jubilee song?. ' Ho wipes the tear,' by Mrs Miramsand Miss Sears, w>*» deservedly encored ; and ' Calvary,' by Miss, Sears, was excellently sung, Mr Henry Palmer officiated as conductor, and Miss Palmer accompanied. Tho Antidote Division, Sons and Daughters of Temperance, held their quarterly summoned meeting on Monday night, when there was a la) go attendance of members, Ero. J. C. Todd, W.P., in tho chair. The election of officers to:>k place, with the following result:— "W.P., Bro. Fcrrier; W.A., B:o. Johnson; U.S., Bro. Slater; A.R.S., Sister Maclean; F.S., Bro. Low; Treasurer, Bro. Jack; Chaplain, Bio. J. M. Fraser ; Con., Bro. Thomas ; A C , Sinter Wc>;t; J.S., Bro. Buie; 0.5., Bro. Thorn ; organist, Sister May. Bro. Slater was appointed agent for the 'Friendly Societies' Recorder.' Two candidates were initiated, and fivo proposed for membership. The receipts for tho night wero L 76 13s 6J. Inquire! are made in ' Lloyd's "Weekly' for the following:—William Sands went to New Zealand in 1858, and his brother John last heard of him as at Wellington, New Zealand. —Dennis David Nicholls went to New Zealand fifteen years ago. His sister has not heard of him for twelve years.— Thomas James Elkerton, who left Headington Quarry, December, 1873, for New Zealand, thence going to New South Wales, is asked to write to his slater.— Hannah Underdown in 1869 or 1870 sailed for Canterbury, Now Zealand. She was last beard from in 1873. Her brother George is anxious. —Mr Adamson and his wife (nie Watts) left Yarmouth for New Zealand in May, 1883. Their mother is anxious.—John Ashford, of Misterton, Somerset, in July, 1855, thought of leaving Bobart Town, Tasmania, for New Zealand. His only surviving son and daughter, Joseph and Elizabeth, wish for news.—James Stuart loft Oxfoid for New Zealand eighteen years ago. jTJis father and mother seek news.— , Margarets williß went to Dunedin, Otago, in ! 1867, and there married Her brother Richard last heard of her thirteen years ag \ j

The half-yearly meeting of the Hand and Heart Lodge, M.U.1.0.0.F., was held in their hall, Stuart stieet, last evening, when there was a very large attendance, N.G. Bro. Hamel presiding. The principal business was thereceiving cf a report of a Special Committee (who were appointed to inq lire into some grievances between the meilical officer and a brother). After a long discussion it was cariied that the report stand over till nest meeting to give brothers an opportunity of fully dis-cu'r-ing it. The other business was the election of officers and install ition of same for the next term, which tes-.ulted as follows : 0.M., Ero. J. If. F. Hamel; K.G., Pro. T. Mant; V.G., Bro. F. t-ouglas; fc\s., Uro. T. Stonebridge; W., l!ro. J. Swan ; G , Bro. W. Power; R.5.N.0., Ero. G. Lockhart ; L.8.N.0., I'ro. F. Bei scl. After a vote of thanks to tho iustalliug officer?, and the elective officors having briefly replied, the summoned meeting was tidjourned till further notice. Une member was admitted by clearance. Bro. Tompkins replied on behalf of the Prince of Wales, and P.G. Bro. Wilkins the Loyal Dunedin, to the second toast; and D.P.G.M. Bro. Miller for the District oflicsrs, to the third toast of the evening. The receipts were L 142 14s 3d,

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Star THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 1889., Evening Star, Issue 7938, 20 June 1889

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The Evening Star THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 1889. Evening Star, Issue 7938, 20 June 1889

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