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"THOSE HORRID BELLS”

TO THE EDITOB.

Sir,—ln this small locality we are blessed with four churches, but luckily only two can boast of having bells. One, a very fair sort of a tin-kettle, is rung whenever required for meetings, etc., and is rung very persistently when at it. The other (the best one) is rung at all times and seasons, quite regardless of trouble. It is slightly heavier than the previous one, and evidently requires half a dozen people to take alternate turns at it in order to discourse its " melodious ” notes for a sufficiently long time; and by way of a variation, and to

relievo the monotony, it is rung a la ther firebell. To the people round about it is extremely pleasant to listen to it; but might I be allowed to suggest to the powers that be (if there are any) that perhaps it would he a great advantage not to ring it in the same manner as a fire signal, for should a fire break out and a signal be given by means of ringing a bell, no one might take any notice of it. A friend of mine, who lives near it, characterises it as “ an infernal nuisance,” and ho says if he were allowed to swear he would materially strengthen the adjective.—l am, etc., Ravessbodrne. Ravensbourne, June 2.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890608.2.37.12.3

Bibliographic details

"THOSE HORRID BELLS”, Evening Star, Issue 7928, 8 June 1889, Supplement

Word Count
224

"THOSE HORRID BELLS” Evening Star, Issue 7928, 8 June 1889, Supplement

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