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LOSS OF THE FIJIAN.

THE CREW AND PASSENGERS SAVED.

The Union Steam Ship Company were this forenoon advised by cablegram by their Sydney office that the e.s. Fijian was loston the 13th ult. on Tanna Island, New Hebrides group. The passengers, officers, and crew were picked up by the A.S.N. Company's Tenterden on the 17th ult., and landed in safety at Fiji, the officers and crew being returned by her to Sydney. Captain Fielding was in command of the Fijian, which traded between Melbourne and Fiji, calling at the New Hebrides. She had only been in , the possession of the Union Steamship Company a few months, having been purchased by the company from Mr G. W. Nichol, of Sydney. She was built by the Palmer Shipbuilding Company in 1886, and was, therefore, a comparatively new boat. The Fijian was valued at L 20.000, and was insured with the National Insurance Company for LIO.OOO ; the Union Steam Ship Company beingjinsurera for half her value. The National Company had re-insured their risk in each of the following offices for LI.QiOO each:—Standard, South British, Colonial, Union, and New Zealand.

(By Eibotbio Tblkgbaph—Copyright. I [Per Press Association.]

SYDNEY, Jpne 3,

The steamer Fijian, bound from Melbourne for the New Hebrides, struck a reef at four o'clock on the morning of May 13 when off Tanna Island. Mr Harley, second officer, was in charge at the time. A frightful crash was heard, and the fore compartment filled immediately. The danger was unseen till the vessel was almost on it, the officer mistaking the reef for an approaching squall. The captain ran ashore on a sandy bottom. Three hundred armed Natives assembled on the beach, but the passengers on being landed, though surrounded, were not molested. Next morning the Natives looted the ship. Captain Fielding had taken the precaution of destroying the spirits The Rev. Mr Watt, Presbyterian missionary, visited the wreck, and said that, owing to the bloodthirstiness of the Natives, he was unable to guarantee the lives of the passengers five minutes. Mr Watt took off the passengers—also the captain, who was in bad health—and conveyed them to the mission station. It is believed that the Natives being engaged in loo'ing the vessel saved the lives of the pissengera. The Eliza Mary, a labor vessel, sighted and stood by the castaways till the steamer Tenterden arrived at the island and brought the crew on to Sydney. The Fijian had six passengers belonging to Suva and Melbourne, all of whom behaved splendidly.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890603.2.19

Bibliographic details

LOSS OF THE FIJIAN., Evening Star, Issue 7923, 3 June 1889

Word Count
417

LOSS OF THE FIJIAN. Evening Star, Issue 7923, 3 June 1889

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