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SPORTING INTELLIGENCE.

The oft-repeated statement that the use of the totalisator is tending to drive horaeowners from this colony to Victoria does not find universal acceptance. Speaking at the annual meeting of the Canterbury Jockey Club a couple of days ago, the Hon. VV. Robinson said it was now generally admitted that the totalisator would bo the means of gambling in the future. They had adopted it in Queensland, Tasmania, and South Australia, and he could say from his experience in Melbourne that every genuine racing man there would hail the introduction of the machine with delight. Mr Charles (}. Psotta, the amateur champion sculler of the United States, whose arrival in London was noticed in a recent cable, is visiting England for the purpose of competing in the race for the Diamond Challenge Sculls at Henley Regatta, which takes place on the 3rd, 4th, and sth of July. Mr Psotta is a member of the New York Athletic Club, is twenty-four years of age, weighs in condition about 12st, and has had 0 such a run of success in the States that ho is looked upon as a very probable winner of the Henley race. Another foreign competitor will be E. Dbring, the German champion. This gentleman has already competed unsuccessfully against the best English amateur oarsmen, but means to make another effort.

The following is the latest betting ou the English Derby Gto4 on Donovan, 10 to I against Pioneer, 100 to 7 Miguel and Lainette.

The following acceptances have been received in connection with the Auckland Racing Club’s winter meeting

Hurdm: Back.— Artist 11, Orangeman 10 12, Odd' folbw 10 6, Recruit 10.4, Armorer 10.2, Kangaroo (LoramV) 9 7, Don 9, Consande 8.12, Loraco 8.10, Le Glair 8.7.

Grkat Northern Stkeplichasb.— Artist 10.7, Guy Fawhes 10, ft, Siii lelagh 10.5, Recruit 10.4, Orangeman 10.2, Oddfellow 10, Landseer 9.7, Don 9.5.

THE STORY OF A DREAM,

The * London Daily Telegraph ’ commends to the attention of the Society for Psychical Research the latest dream story in connection with racing. A well-known ex-military sportsman for some weeks past had made up his mind that he would “try end dream the winner of the Lincoln Handicap.” This ingenious idea of his he announced to several of his friends, who naturally smiled somewhat sceptically on the would-bo seer. However, recently, five times in succession, he dreamed that “No. 13” had won the race. As there was no horse of that name, the sportsman in question came to the conclusion that his vision must refer to the number on the card. He made no secret of his belief, and ho sent a messenger to King’s Cross to get the card and back his dream - number. There were no cards to be had at the station. Accordingly he wired to Messrs W. H. Smith and Sons’ bookstall at Lincoln for “ the name of No. 13 on to-day’s card for the handicap.” The answer came back promptly “Wise Man.” Iho resolute dreamer immediately backed the horse, with the happy result that all wise racing men now wot of. Every detail of this singular story is absolutely true, and there are many who can testify to having heard the prophecy of “No, 13” delivered previous to the race. ’CYCLING NOTES. The recent fine weather has made the roads lively with bicyclists, trips having been made during the past week to Blueskin, the Taieri, and also again to Henley, the last-named place being always attractive to some riders. The Blueskin road is reported to be in capital order, and two rear drivers made a good trip to the village the other day. The safety type of machine has caused this road to be more ridden than of yore. The many friends of Steadman, the wellknown Taieri ’cyclist, will be sorry to hear that he has recently been laid up, but I am glad to report he is about again. A party of riders, some on bicycles and one on a horse, recently took a trip into the country. At feeding time there was abundance of “tucker” for the riders, and the steel steeds were satisfied with a little oil; but the flesh and blood one was not so easily fed, and cake or preserved pears would not do for him. However, a little prospecting round discovered a handy stable with an ample supply of feed, and here our equine friend munched his fill while his rider searched far and wide for the owner of the stable—and he is, I believe, still seeking him without success. The Pioneer Bicycle Club intend holding a race meeting at Christmas, at which several Australian crack riders will probably compete. The meeting is to extend over three days; but for many reasons I think this a mistake, and it is to be hoped the promoters will reduce it to two days, as visitors cannot spare the time necessary if the present intentions are carried out. The Dunedin Club will also hold their usual meeting during Exhibition time, as to which I shall say more anon,

An enterprising English firm recently hit upon a happy advertising idea by inviting suggestions as to the most appropriate title for a new safety bicycle which they were about to launch on the market, one of the aforesaid bicycles to be given to the cyclist who suggested the most appropriate name. The firm received 20,000 replies, and now they are in a dilemma as to whom the prize shall be awarded,

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890601.2.43

Bibliographic details

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE., Issue 7922, 1 June 1889

Word Count
913

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE. Issue 7922, 1 June 1889

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