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WOMEN'S RIGHTS.

TO THE EDITOR.

Sir,—The women of the English nation (in that include America) are banding themselves together for the purpose of petitioning Parliament to abolish the liquor traffic. Now, it is a great question whether in doing this the women have a real grievance. Every unprejudiced person must admit they have. They but petition for the abolition of a thing that eeriously affects women throughout the world. It is needless to adduce facts to show what sufferings this traffic has brought upon women especially. In thousands of cases they have lost their Bona and their daughters and their husbands through it, and much else besides, so that in petitioning they have a grievance indeed. Now, therefore, I say that any Parliament that despises such petition acta a very foolish part. It would be trampling on the cry of the innocent who suffer the Injury, and to do that would be, indeed, a very foolish policy on tho part of any governing body. In the light of this, therefore, it is to be hoped that, as the Wellington ' Post' suggests, our Exhibition Executive will reconsider the petition from the W.C.T.U., that no strong drink will be sold within the precincts of the Exhibition.—l am, etc., Prohibition. Dunedin, May 27.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890527.2.45.1

Bibliographic details

WOMEN'S RIGHTS., Evening Star, Issue 7917, 27 May 1889

Word Count
210

WOMEN'S RIGHTS. Evening Star, Issue 7917, 27 May 1889

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