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THE SAN FRANCISCO MAIL.

General Boulanger is said to be almost unnoticed in London, where ho expected to become the lion of the season.

The London 'Telegraph' proposes a national recognition of the explorer Stanley on his return from Africa.

Professor Harrison, an Englishman, was committod to Londonderry Guol and tried on Tuesday, April 23, on a charge of assisting the besoiged tenants at Gwcedoro. While being conveyed to gaol ho was heartily cheered by the populace. The sergeant who was in charge of the police ordered his men to "beat the devil out of them," and Fathers Gilder, Boyle, Cony-beare,-O'Brien, and O'Shea, as well as the reporter of the London ' Daily Nows,' were roughly handled. Women were trampled upon by the crowd, and in some instances clubbed by the police, The Union Conference at Birmingham on April 25 adopted resolutions affirming that the land question is at the root of Irish discontent, and urged the Government to introduce a measure to enable the tenants to become owners of the land.

In his speech at Bristol on April 13 Lord Salisbury made a bitter attack upon Home Rule. He ridicaled the agitation, and said Cornwall had as much right to Home Rule as Ireland. The nationality arguments, he said, were claptrap, which would sacrifice the best interests of industry and commerce to mere empty sentiment. On May 2 the Tipperary Court affirmed tbe sentences of O'Connor, Condon, and Manning, all members of Parliament, for offences under the Crimes Act. They were conveyed to Clonmel Gaol the same afternoon. A crowd met the prisoners at the station, and cheered. The prisoners refused to enter the prison van, and a desperate struggle ensued between the guards and the prisoners, in which the people took part. The police finally, to avoid bloodshed, allowed them to walk to gaol, with the exception of Dr Tanner, whose foot was severely wounded, and ho went in a carriage. In his address at the banquet of the College of Physicians at Dublin on the 17th April, tho Marquis of Londonderry, in announcing his resignation of the office of Lord Lieutenant, denied that this step was duo to anything that Mr Balfour had said. He accepted the office for two years, and agreed to retain it a third at the request of the Government.

The Empress Elizabeth of Austria is subject to the same mental malady that afflicted her cousin, King Louis of Bavaria. When the Empress learned of the death of Prince Rudolph she imagined she was her son's murderer. At present the acute stage of the disease has passed, leaving noticeable softening of the brain. It was telegraphed on April 23 that the Emperor had paid the late Crown Prince's debts, which amounted to 2,500,000d01. A wealthy Scotchman residing in Hongkong has offered to subscribe LIO.OOO to a fund to indemnify the Londcn ' Times' in its present trouble. What is known as the Australian election law has been adopted by both Houses of the State of Missouri Legislature. The contract for building powerful coast defence ironclads has been awarded by the naval authorities at Washington to San Francisco.

An English syndicate has subscribed the money necessary to complete the tunnel under the Hudson River, New York. Contrary to his physician's predictions when he was recently stricken with paralysis, and to general expectation, Edwin Booth reappeared on April 15 at Cleveland Opera-house. Ho played lago to Barrett's Othello. One of the most extraordinary sights ever seen for a frontier country was presented in the heart of Indian territory for a week or more before April 22, on which day a large area of land known as Okalhoma, formerly held as a military reservation but lately turned over to the Interior Department, was proclaimed by the President open to settlement by American citizens. Thousands upon thousands of intending settlers had gathered waiting for tho signal to advance, and were only held back from anticipating the date fixed by tho President by the presence of a large body of troops. When the order to advance was given this army of home seekers flowed over the promised land like a rush of water when the floodgates are opened. There were some fights and loss of life as a consequence among the selectors, but all things considered the settlement under tho circumstances was effected without much trouble. A United States revenue cutter was sent on April 20 to one of tho Aleutian Islands, off the Alaskan coast, to overhaul a man named M'Phcrson, a former San Franciscan, who had taken possession under a set of forged papers. Ho declared himself king, hoiated a flag, and hanged three Natives for questioning his authority. Ho will be brought to San Francisco and tried for murder.

It is charged by naval experts that the defects pointed out in British war vessels have been copied in the construction of vessels for the United States Navy. Reports state that the scenes at the New York celebration of Washington's centenary were terrible beyond description. There came near to being a panic at the parade on account of the aides of the marshal being unused to horseback riding. The animals became unmanageable, and their riders could net obey orders. At the grand ball the waiters, policemen, and messenger boys drank most of the free champagne. In the corridors free fights were indulged in, and drunken waiters invaded the ball room flourishing fizzing bottles of wine. None of the distinguished guests were cared for in the least. The guests fought wildly to get out of the building, but even this privilege was denied them. Women were insulted, plants stolen, and wine passed out by waiters and soldiers. The arrangements were altogether inadequate, and a reckless disregard of all decencies of life prevailed. The ball cost 80,000dol. Thirteen families were evicted at Falcarrah (Ireland) on April 24. The proposed Nationalist demonstration at Pilktown (Ireland), proclaimed by the Government, was held at Skough instead, the police being outwittod. The crowd on thoir return were charged by hussars. No one was injured. ' Doris,' the new opera by Alfred Cellier and Stephenson, was produced at the Lyric Theatre, Dublin, on April 21. It went flat, and is a failure.

The St. Louis Limited express, on the Grand Trunk railroad, jumped the track a few miles from Hamilton, Ontario, on April 29, and went over an embankment. The train was going at the rate of nearly a mile a minute. Eight coaches were wrecked, and twenty persons killed. The baggage car telescoped the smoker, and then both caught fire. There were 115 passengers on board, and ten train har,ds. Thirty of the passengers wero in the smoker, from which fifteen oharred bodies were taken, thirteen passengers escaped, and two in attempting to do so were killed instantly. Those who were free tried to save the passengers pinioned in the blazing smoke, but without success. The wrecking of the water tank cut off the supply of water, and all that could be obtained was dashod on the flames by means of pails. The agonising but unavailing appeals for help from the imprisoned passengers who were roasting to death were heartrending. Many of the bodies were so badly charred that they broke to pieces in the handling. None of the train men were seriously injured.

AMERICAN. An organisation called the SpanishAmerican Commercial Union, to develop trade with South America, has been formed in New York. Mexico, South and Central America, West Indies, and the Philippine Islands are embraced in its range. Many prominent New Yorkers are interested. ' A cyclono struck Warsaw, N.C., on May 2, and destroyed many buildings. The ■Seminary was split in two and wrecked, and the Presbyterian Church totally demolished. The Prohibition amendment to the Constitution of Massachusetts was defoated on April 2 by a majority of over 44,000 votes. The liquor men are equally astonished with the total abstinence advocates at the result. The Watson Gold Medal and lOOdol in gold founded by the late Dr James C. Watson, of Washington (D.C.). to be given to the citizen of any country who has made %\l9 inost important discovery in £bstronomy

during the year, was on April 18 awarded to Dr Edward Schonefeld, of the University of Bonn, Germany. On the 18th April, James Mundy, a workman employed in rebuilding the Niagara Suspension Bridge, fell a distance of 200 ft into the river. The body was seen to enter the whirlpool, but rescuo was impossible.

•THE TIMES'-PARNELL COM MISSION.

In his evidence on May 1, Mr Parnell said ho had always regarded the Phcenix Park murders aa a great calamity to Ireland. He had never been able to obtain the slightest evidence connecting the League with the murders excepting the untrustworthy statements of the informer Carey. He did not believe the stories about Eg*n supplying Invincibles from the League fund. The payment of LIOO to Byrne was made in response to a letter asking for an advance for the purposes of the Land League, and not for the purpose of enabling him to escape. He had not the slightest suspicion that Byrne was engaged in any conspiracy. When cross-examined, Mr Parnell said he wanted to include all Irishmen in the League, and asked the physical force men to abandon their movement and accept his. To shut the door in their faces because they did not immediately agree would have been very foolish. He did not recollect makings speech at Lynn (Mass,), in which he said when England waß beaten the time would come to realise the idea of the Nationalists.

On May 3 Sir R. Webster quoted a statement made by Mr Parnell in the House of Commons during tho debate on Mr Forster'a Bill in 1881, suspending the writ of Habeas Corpus, to the effect that secret societies had ceased to exist in Ireland. "Did you believe that when you said it," asked the Attorney-General. "No," said Mr Purnell, "at any rate it was an exaggerated statement;" and a buzz of surprise was heard in the Court room at the response. "Did you," continued the AttorneyGeneral, "intend to misstate facts when you made that statement ?" " I have no doubt I did," was the reply.

" Deliberately?"—" Yes, deliberately." " You deliberately made a statement knowing it to be untrue ?" —" Yes, if not untrue, very extravagant and boastful." " And you have never since withdrawn it?'-" No."

The nonchalance with which the witness made the admission astonished the audience and elicited hisses.

"Probably," added Mr Parnell, "the statement was made to mislead the House, but I am afraid it did not, for the Bill passed. My purpose was to exaggerate the effect of the League in reducing the number of secret societies. The League had undoubtedly diminished them, though it had not swept them away. So I stated."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890527.2.43

Bibliographic details

THE SAN FRANCISCO MAIL., Evening Star, Issue 7917, 27 May 1889

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THE SAN FRANCISCO MAIL. Evening Star, Issue 7917, 27 May 1889

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