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In an interesting despatch, Dr Macgregor, of New Guinea, gives some particulars of the arrest of a Native named Bokano, accused of murder. He says:—“ The scene that followed the arrest of Bokano was very impressive, and illustrated in a very striking manner the deeply affectionate feelings these people entertain for each other. As he was led through the village, men, women, and children joined on to the procession, forcing themselves forward to embrace the prisoner and to kiss him'; and once some person began to cry, and then crying became general, and I was obliged to interpose to Keep back the constantly accumulating crowd to leave a passage for the prisoner. When he was taken away from the beach in the boat several hundred people were crying and lamenting along the strand, and many of the women waded into the sea, wailing plaintively, and beating the water and their breasts as manifestations of grief. A great number of them remained on a projecting sandspit, gazing steadily out to sea as long as the vessel was in sight. 1 should mention that Bokano’s friends offered me as his ransom some Native property and Bokano’s wife.” Madame Carnot of France has set the example among the ladies of the Presidential court of wearing lilies of the valley on all occasions, and these flowers are now regarded as the emblem of the Carnot regime.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890524.2.3.8

Bibliographic details

Page 1 Advertisements Column 8, Evening Star, Issue 7915, 24 May 1889

Word Count
232

Page 1 Advertisements Column 8 Evening Star, Issue 7915, 24 May 1889

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