Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

AUSTRALIAN NOTES.

Four men who were found guilty of impersonation at the New South Wales general election, were each sentenced to eighteen months' imprisonment with hard labor. It is understood that the Victorian Government propose to give notice of the remissions of duty to be submitted for the consideration of Parliament with the next Budget. The remissions will be very much the same as those suggested in the Budget scheme of last session, and will include the reduction of the duty on tea from 3d to Id per lb, the abolition of the duty on coffee, cocoa, and kerosene. At Mr Dillon's meeting at Sydney over L 2.000 was collected in Her Majesty's Theatre. A young man named William Bruce, in the employ of Messrs Wright, Heaton, and Co,, at Dubbo, committed suicide in a very determined manner. He was walking about town during the evening with a young woman, and seems to have had some words with her about a man she had been keeping company with, and who had threatened to shoot Bruce if he saw him (Bruce) walking with the girl again. He went to hi 3 father's residence in Talbragar street, adjoining Heaton's chaff store, and there procured a revolver belonging to a man named Power. A Mr and Mrs Robinson, who lived next door, heard a shot, and on going to the back of the house discovered Bruce in a dying state, with a. bullet wound in his forehead, immediately between the eyes. The unfortunate fellow expired in a few minutes. On the body were found some letters, in which the girl had stated that Bhe did not intend to walk with him again, and that she was quite tired of him. An unsigned letter was also found, stating that the writer would shoot Bruce if he saw him walking with the writer's girl again. In a letter left by Bruce himself, he stated that he wished

Rose to forgive him, and for his dog to bo given to his sister. A smous aßpect of affairs in the management of the Church of England at Sale has occurred. Csmn Watson, who has been there for ttvelv* years as pastor, has just gone to England on a twelve months' tour. His locum tenens is the Rev. Mr Poynter, formerly of Dunolly. The new minister, although only a few weeks in Sale, has taken objection to the musical part of the service, complaining that it was sensuous rather than spiritual, and he, to remedy matters, ordered the organist to omit the anthem and several hymns and the choral responses in the evening. At the services on a recent Sunday the rev. gentleman delivered a sermon upon church music, in which he referred to irreverence in some choirs, and to the singing of music that was too high for the congregation to join in with. The Board of Guardians met, and considered that the pastor had acted outside of them, and they, or at least ten out of twelve of their number, handed in their resignations, and stated they would withdraw their support from the church. There is, consequently, now a deadlock, with no one to manage the church or pay the stipend. Mr Payton Kerr, of Sydney University, is to succeed Mr H. Morley as Professor of English Literature and Language at the London University. Mr James Oddie (reports the 'fiallarat Star') has purchased in England an tight refractor telescope and spectroscope for the observatory at Mount Pleasant. The cost of the additions is something over L9OO, and they are now on their way to the colony. Miss Jenny Watt-Tanner, a native of Beech worth, and a favorite in the Australian colonies, has appeared with great success in a farcical comedy, entitled ' The Bookmaker,' at Terry's Theatre, London. After her first performance, c The Timeß' described Miss Watt-Tanner as " a lady of commanding presence, proved to be possessed of no small degree of talent." As a schoolgirl Miss Watt-Tanner displayed a talent for acting, and there are numbers of her schoolmates who have spent their Saturday afternoons assisting in the production of the little plays written by her —the scene of the performances being a shady nook on Pennyweight Flat.—Ovens paper. Mr W. H. Paling, of Sydney, ha 9 presented the Committee of the Blue Ribbon Gospel Army with an acre of ground and LI,OOO for the erection of a boys' home at Camden, where they will be trained to agricultural pursuits. Mr Paling will also donate LIOO per annum in support of the object. The will of the late Daniel M'Kinnon, grazier, of Terang (Victoria), has been proved at 1124,000. The death is announced of Captain Charles Chessell, one of the earliest traders in the colonies. Early in the "thirties" he was the master of the Lively, cutter, which acted as tender to the Toola on an exploring cruise to the vicinity of the South Pole. About 1839 he settled at Hobart, where he opened a shipbuilding yard, and there built the Maria Orr to the order of Mr Dean, tbis being the first squarerigged vessel built and fitted out by private enterprise in Tasmania. In 1843 Captain Chessell emigrated to Victoria, and opened a slip, commonly known as Chessell's dock, on the south bank of the Yarra. The old Government dredge, the "Griper," was there constructed by him, and he also built the Elizabeth, the first schooner constructed on the banks of the Yarra.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890522.2.37

Bibliographic details

AUSTRALIAN NOTES., Evening Star, Issue 7913, 22 May 1889

Word Count
909

AUSTRALIAN NOTES. Evening Star, Issue 7913, 22 May 1889

Working