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SHIPPING.

High Water.

Tomorrow. Taiaroa Heads: 2.59 a.m. 321 p.m. Port Chalmers: 3,39 a.m., 4.1 p.m. Dunedin: 424 a.m., 4.46 p.m,

Port Chalmers.

ARRIVED.-May 15.

Grafton, s.s., 297 tons, Nordstrom, from the West Coast via Timaru. Passengers : Mrs Christie, Miss Simmons, Messrs Given, Day, Scott, Jersey, Drummond; eleven steerage, Wakatipu, s.s., 1,158 tons, "Wheeler, from Sydney via Wellhgton and Lyttelton. Passengers : Mr and Mrs Davidson, Misses Thomson and Keaney, Mrs Southern, Captain Everest; twenty-nine in tho steerage, BATLED.-May 14. Kakauui, s.s., 59 tons, Beat, for Fortroae. Beautiful Star, s.s., 146 tons, Brewer, for Oamaru. May 10, Mararoa, s.s.. 1,218 tons, Edie, for Sydney via East Coast ports. Passengers: For Lyttelton—Misses Turnbull and Ohurton, Mrs Ohurton and child, Mr Ohurton. For Wellington—Misses Broad, Ohurton, and Mann, Mesdamea Davis, Preston and child, Fultop,

Messrs Campbell, A. M‘Lein,_ Symes. For Napier—Mrs Morris. For Gisborne—M'sses Barker, Howarth, Mrs Nixon, Messrs Barker (3). For Auckland—Mrs Wiloocks and child, Mr Wilcocks. For Sydney—Mrs Honeser, Mr Jiffs; five in the steerage.

During the last few years shipowners have saved between 1320,0 0 and L 330.000 by the reduction of the Suez Canal dues.

Eighty per cent, of the coasting trade at Madagascar is carried on under the British flag, and 60 per cent, of the merchandise is British,

Captain Theodore Cook, R.N.R., after fortyseven years of active sesvice with the Cunard Company, has retired, owing to failing health, from the command of the Royal Mr.il steamer Etruria. His place as commodore of the Canard fleet will be taken by O.iptrin M'Michan, R N.R., of tho Royal Mail steamer Uinbrift.

It is a curious coincidence that nc fewer than three steamers named Sultan figured simultaneously in the casuolty list from March 15 to March 22: H.M.9. Sultan, at Malta; the cotton-laden Sultan, in the Atlantic ; and the gr'ain-ladon Sultan, in the Tyne, with decks swept and other damage. The 'William Turner commenced this forenoon to discharge her coals at tho export pier. Tho Wakatipu, from Sydney via Wellington and Lyttelton, arrived at Port Chalmers at 0.40 p.m. to-day, and steamed alongside the George street pier to discharge coals. Purser Touett reports leaving Sydney at 10.5 p.m, on May 7 ,* cleared the Heads at 10,50 p.m.; experienced easterly winds across, breasting Cape Farewell light at 7 30 p.m. on the 12th, and Stephens Island at 11.3) p.m.; arrived at Wellington at 7.45 am on the 13th, and left at 5 p.m. the same day ; torched Lyttelton at 7.30 a.m. on the 14th, and sailed at 430 p.m., passing Akaroa at 8 p.m. Met with moderate, variable wif d-i down the coast.

The Kakanui left Dunedin yesterday evening with cargo for Fortrose. The Grafton arrived at the Rattray street wharf at 5a m. to-day. She left Westport at G p.m. ou the 10th hist, and reached Nelson at 2 p.m. on the 11th ; left again at 3 p m.. and arrived at Wellington at 2.45 a.m. on the 12»h ; left that port at 9.15 a.m., and arrived at Lyttelton at 6 a.m, ou tho 13th ; left again at 8.15 p.m., and arrived at Timaru at 10,45 a.m. on the 14th inst.; left that port at 5,10 p.m. same day, and reached the wharf this morning, Mr Hume (purser) reports fresh S.W. winds with fine weather from Westport to Wellington: thence she met a S.W. gale with high seas till she passed the Kaikoura®, followed by fine weather and fresh S.E. winds to arrival.

The repairs to tho barque Brussels are being rapidly carried out. The rigging is in a forward state, and a gang of men are busily caulking her decks.

The Mararoa left the Victoria wharf this afternoon with cargo and passengers for Auckland via East Coast ports. The Beautiful Star (Captain Brewer) left tho Rattray street wharf at 10 p.m. yesterday with cargo and passengers for Oamaru. Captain Oliver, of the Mawhora, which arrived at Russell yesterday from Fiji, reports tho total las of the four-masted ship Altraore, at Vuva, one of the western islands of the Fiji group. The chief officer was drowned. A boat with a number ot passengers and crew was missing when the Mawhera left Levuka. During a gale of wind at Warrnambool, the barque Rachel was blown ashore, and subsequently the vessel was sold as she lay, by Messrs Archibald and Bateman, to a Mr Galvin for Ll2O. The vessel has since been floated and has been found perfectly sound. She is to be towed to Melbourne, and will probably realise L6OO or L7OO when she is again knocked down. Mr W. R Claridge, 1 «to traffic manager to the Union Steam Ship Company, who recently arrived at Adelaide to occupy the position of assistant secretary to the Adelaide Steam Ship Company, was there the recipient of a presentation from tho branch managers and agents of the Union Steam Ship Company. Tho presentation took place at the office of Messrs Harrold Brothers, the Adelaide agents for tho Union Company, and took the form of a handsomely framed illuminated address, accompanied by a purse of sovereigns.— 4 Register.’ Mr B. H. Amon, of Lower Rangltikei, found on tho 3rd instant, at high water mark, about half a mile north of the Rangitikei River, a sealed bottle containing a printed document, of which tho following is a copy;—“H.MS. Raven, latitude4ldeg Bmin S,, longitude lG4deg 40min E.; 10th of December, 1888. Frank My ley, commander. "Whoever finds this paper is reou'sted to forward it to tho Secretary of the Admiral'y, London, with a not® of the time and place at which it was found. Hydrographic Office, Admiralty.” The position where the bottle was thrown into the sea was about halfway between New Zealand and Australia,—‘New Zealand Times.’

MOVEMENTS OF THE UNION STEAM SHIP COMPANY’S FLEET.

■Wednesday, Mat 15.

Wellington.— Takapuna arrived 11.30 a.in. from Nelson; sailed 3 p.ra. for Lyttelton.— Rotorua arrired 1 p.m. from Lyttelton, Nelson. —Penguin arrired 6 a.m. from Wellington; returns 8 p.ra —Mahinapua arrived 6 n.m from Wellington ; Bailed 3 p.ra. for Westport.

THE ACCIDENT TO THE lONIC. We make the following extract from a statement bv a passenger supplied to the Christchurch ‘Press’:—“At 7 p.m., dinner being just finished, several of tha passengers began to remark on the curious movement of the screw, which was working in a labored, thudding manner, causing the whole ship to shudder and palpitate. This went on for nearly an hour, by which time almost all the ladies and several of the gentlemen were assembled in the saloon to begin their evening amusements, and wo then noticed a further change in the motion of the screw, which became uncertain and intermittent, and finally ceased altogether. However, the report was circulated that the bearings were heated, and no serious alarm was felt until the captain’s steward appear! d and called away one of the elder gentlemen. This made us slightly nervous, but what were our feelings when he appeared again, again, and yet again, summoning each time the head of a family or other prominent passenger. I am sure that the quarter of an hour which elapsed until the return of the gentlemen will be remembered by all who were in the saloon of the lonic that evening as one of the moat painful episodes in their lives, and the news that came back from the captain’s cabin scarcely relieved the tension at all. * The after crank is broken,’ so we aro told ; ‘ we are 930 miles from Lyttelton in a straight line, and 4,500 miles from Valparaiso; and under these circumstances the captain has decided that the wise and prudent course is to turn the vessel’s head and proceed to New Zealand under sail.’ It must bo admitted that, under these circumstances, it was difficult to feel very cheerful. There we were, cast adrift on that lonely Southern Ocean, a huge unmanageable _ hulk, in great danger, in case of drifting south, of falling in with strong easterly winds, which might carry us no man knew whither, and oven, 'coking on the best side, weeks might elapse before reaching land, and it gave us all a horrible tightening of the heart to think of those who would be watching and waiting for our arrival at Rio de Janeiro. The next two or three d >ys were so wretched that we will none of ua ever care to recall them. A contrary wind prevailed at first; though we made some progress northwards we still drifted to the east, _ A strong gale then came up, and we rolled heavily from side to side, and were reduced to the depths of depression and wretchedness; but the lonic behaved wonderfully well under sail, and made the long run of 125 miles in twenty-four hours—a remarkably good performance under the circumstances. Then tho wind fell, and we lay becalmed ; but on "Wednesday morning a great change came over the scene, and what was our joy at noon on May 8 to feel the screw revolve again—slowly indeed, but still we began to move at a very fair pace, I believe I am correct in saying that the after crank, though badly cracked, had not actually parted asunder, and after long and serious consideration the captain and chief engineer undertook the great responsibility of working the machinery m its crippled condition, and we have been so favored by wind and weather that we have had the almost incredible good fortune of getting back to New Zealand in eight days, when at one time wo were fully expecting to drift about for a month at least, at the mercy of the wind and waves. Our breakdown occurred in latitude 52deg 12min S., longitudel6SdegW.,and we had travelled about 1,000 miles on our homeward journey. It is impossible to speak too highly of the kindness and consideration of Captain Kidley and his officers.” The Dunedin passengers were:— Saloon: Mr G, O. Brownell, Mr S. H. Pollard, Mr J. Sinclair, Mrs Thomson, Masters K. and O. Thomson, Miss Thomson, Mr B. Heney. Second saloon: Mr and Mrs H. L. Cayzer, Mr A. J. Gray, Mrs and Master E. Hutchinson, Miss Thurtle, Mr John Jones. Steerage: Mr S. Key, Mr F. Rabey, Mr James Reid, Mr James Pallistor, Mr Bockland, Mr William Mann, Mr F, Evans.

COLLISION AT AUCKLAND. At 7 p.m. yesterday the s.s. Australia, bound for East Coast porta and Wellington, when in Rangitoto channel, six miles outside the harbor, collided with the American barque Essex and tho tug Awhina, which were lashed together. The Essex was coming into harbor from Brisbane, and had been picked up by the tug outside Tiri two hours previously. The cause of the accident is not yet known, but lights were seen before the collision occurred. The Australia struck the other boats about the bows,

but she received little injury. Her afterport quarter is slightly dented and the deck planks somewhat started. The bowsprit of the Essex was carried away, and slight injury done to the rigging. The moat serious damage was received by the Awhina. It is thought that her stern has been twisted out of place and the planking strained. As she was making water she was beached at Rangitoto. The Australia, which had a number of passengers on board, returned to port, and the Essex sailed to the anchorage in the stream. There was a good deal of shouting, but no confusion, on board the vessels when they collided. Shipping Telegrams, Auckland, May 15.—7 a.m., Mawhera, from Fiji via Uusse I ]. Oamaru, May 15.—Early, Beautiful Star, from Dunedin; 5 p.m, Beautiful Star, for L>aue(Uu» Invercargill, May 15.—Noon, Invercargill, from Dunedin.

Napier (Spit), May 15.—7 a.in., Per.dle Hill, for Sydney. Lyttelton, May 15.—12 40 p.m., ship Salamanca, for London, London, May 14.—Lang-tone, barque, from Napier. Sydney, May 14.—Ohau and Hauroto, from New Zealand.

Melbourne, May 14.—Waihora, for the Bluff.—Taupo, from the Bluff.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890515.2.26

Bibliographic details

SHIPPING., Issue 7907, 15 May 1889

Word Count
1,974

SHIPPING. Issue 7907, 15 May 1889

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