Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

IMPERIAL FEDERATION.

TO THB KDITOB. SIR,—In the London ' Times' of March 23 there is a most interesting letter from Professor Goldwin Smith on ' The Commercial Relations between Canada and the United States.! As the letter is rather too long for insertion in your columns, and as we have heard a good deal lately about federation, perhaps you might find room lor the last part of his letter, giving the opinion of a most loyal Englishman on Canadian federation.—l am, etc., Francis Waddell. Dunedin, May 13. In every respect, except politically, the fusion of the two portions of the Engliah-speakiix? race on this'continent is almost complete. We even largely use the American currency, and American bank notes pasß in Ontario at par: whilst those of our own maritime provinces and Manitoba do not. I* is reasonable to suppose that in the end political union will follow, and that the English-speaking, population of North

America will some day become altogether one people Thero is at least one loyal Englishman who believes that England will be the gainer by that consummation; that having irrecoverably lost all real power hero, and having nothing left but liabilities and dinger, she would be fortunate in exchanging these for a secure and lasting friendship with the whole continent. That Canadian society can by the presence of a representative monarchy with his court, or by d ; stributing a few baronetcies and knighthoods, be mvla otherwise than democratic must, to eve*yone who knows Canada, appear the fondest of dreams. But, as I have before said, the belief that palitical union is imminent, so that a meie fUcal change would bring it about-, does not fe<m to me to be well founded. All the Canadian politicians, for vety obvious reasons, !>!■: assinst it, and it would he very difficult fo. the people (even if they were so inclined) to move without the piliticianc The Americans, saving a few frenzied "tail-twisters," are as far as possible from desiring to force us into the Vnion. They are indifferent, if not averse, to the extension of territory, and they know that they would be storing up trouble for themselves by annexing five millions of unwilling and dissatisfied citizens. Of the American politicians many, perhaps most, are at least as much afraid of the disturbance which the Canadian vote might produoa in the balance of parties as they are ambitious of national aggrandizement. A Republican Senator told me in plain terms that he would bo opposed to the reception of Canada into the Union, because Canada would vote democratic Communities are not easily lifted out of tha ruts in which they have for tome time run. Apart, therefore, from the actual pressure on Canada of commercial or actual war, it seems to me that the day of political union with the American Republic, though sure to come, may be distant. In the meantime Canada must have access to her natural matket, that is the United States.—Yours faithfully, Goldwin Smith. Toronto, March 11.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890513.2.26.1

Bibliographic details

IMPERIAL FEDERATION., Issue 7905, 13 May 1889

Word Count
497

IMPERIAL FEDERATION. Issue 7905, 13 May 1889

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working