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THE SEAMEN'S UNION.

TO IHB EDITOB. Sir,—ln your issue of 10th inst. there is> a letter signed by "Eye-witness" charging the Seamen's Union with only admitting .candidates who can buy the votes of members with beer, and that temperance men cannot therefore gain admission. Having a pretty fair idea who- this very temperate, respectable, and competent "Eye-witness *' is, I would simply like to say that he was a candidate not .very many months ago for admission to the society, bat was rejected, not because he was a temperance man, as that was not known to members, but because of his previous action in sitting on the fenoe for the past eight years, whilst the society were struggling for existence. Had he cared about his brother seamen, who, unlike " Eye-witness," had to go to sefiy he would have joined the Union long ere Cbis for their sakes. But, being in a billet on shore, thought there would never be any necessity for his going to sea again; and now, finding work slack on shore, he thinks the Seamen's Union should rush to him with open arms, I respectfully beg to inform him thattheSeamen's Union is not a home for the destitute. Furthermore, the members of the Seamen's Union have sufficient power ol discernment to distinguish the difference between a sheep and a wolf, although the latter may be well disgaised; and they prefer fighting an open enemy to having any traitors in their midst.

I thank "Eye-witness" for his generous advice to get all the money we can. We do so, and happen to be able to get as mock money %s we require; and had "Eyewitness" known anything about trades* nnionism he would know how it was got,, and that bis idle threat of a strike wool* not make our hearts beat one stroke faster. His statement that numbers of men leaver the vessels of the Uskm Company every trip is false, as there are vessels of the Union Company where there baa not been a shift for months, and we can say npon the authority of the largest colonial ana Home shipowners that the Federated Seamen's Union of New Zealand is the finest body of seamen in the world.

Upon the matter of wages I have no intention to say anything beyond that seamen are not better paid than shore labor wbe» the hours worked are taken into consideration and the dangers of their work. In tfoflclusion, " Eye-witness " should remember that persons who live in glass, houses should not throw stones. He will understand this, and perhaps see another reason for his rejection for admission to the Union.—l am, etc., Msmbkb. Dunedin, May 11.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890511.2.22.2

Bibliographic details

THE SEAMEN'S UNION., Evening Star, Issue 7904, 11 May 1889

Word Count
445

THE SEAMEN'S UNION. Evening Star, Issue 7904, 11 May 1889

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