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The Evening Star. TUESDAY, JUNE 12, 1883.

A son of Mr Graham Berry has been awarded L 450 as compensation for the Hawthorn accident.

The ‘ Bruce Herald ' suggests that if it be decided to erect new buildings for the Industrial School, they should be located on the police reserve at Milton instead ’0? Vc Seacliff.

A requisition is \h course of signature in the southern savt of the electorate asking Mr Adam Handels to contest the Bruce seat. Mr Janies M ‘Donald, of Milburn, is also to be Asked to come forward.

Mr Driver, M.H.R., while on his way South to visit the Hokomri efectoVe, met with rather a serious accident &t Clarendon. While walking in the paddocks after dark he fell into a drain, spraining one of his legs so badly that he had to return to town, and is likely to be laid up some time, The Messrs Watson have arranged with Mr Small to at once proceed with the remainder of their building. It will be •erected in five months, and is to be entirely fireproof, all the floors being in concrete ana the partifcions in light brickwork. Over threequarters of a mile of iron joisting will be used, and when finished it will probably be the safest and finest building of its kind ever erected in. one colonies.

O’Leary, the American pedestrian, still dissatisfied with the results of his recent contests with W, Edwards, has again matched himself against the latter for a six days’ walk, for L 250 a-eide; the contest to Commence at Sydney on July 9. Either man not covering 450 miles is to forfeit his entire share of the takings during the final two days of the contest. Both men are ready to back themselves to cover 500 miles, whilst SAWards will take odds that he does 52Q miles.

“ With a view to the better protection of the public from adulteration of beer,” Colonel Barue, M.P., proposes to enact that anyon’e who sells by wholesale or by retail beer Containing any ingredients other than hops and barley-malt shall keep Conspicuously posted at the place of sale n notice stating what the ingredients are. the maximum fine for a first neglect to comply with this direction is fixed by Colonel Barne’s Bill at L2O, and for any subsequent offence at LSO. Half of each fine is given by the Bill to the informer,

At the Oam.artt Police Court yesterday one James Connolly was charged with cruelty to a hotee. It [Appeared that Connolly hfed hired a horse from a livery stable and returned it in a state that led to the information against him being laid. On the off side of the horse were thirteen or fourteen punctured and incised wounds below the ’saddle, and there were some wounds on the wither. Two of the wounds below the Saddle were an inch deep and an inch long, and would probably have been caused by a knife. When ’Connolly dismounted at the stables it was b'oticed that he had blood on his right hand and on the right leg of his trOhscrs ; and a knife he had on him hid also blood on it. When arrested he said “The brute would not, go for Ine ; I was digging my heels into him all the way; they did not give me either whip or spurs.” Mr Robinson, R.M., said that it was only a case of grave suspicion, and the accused must be discharged. Had it been a civil claim for damages the decision of the Court would have been very different.

The London ‘ Medical Record ’ gives the following instance oLhow domesticity may be a cause of insanity. Mrs M——, aged forty-four, mother of eight children, had acute mania. The husband, when asked if he could suggest any cause for her illness, exclaimed with much animation that he could not conceive any reason. “She is a most domestic woman; is always doing something for her children ; is always at work for us all; never goes out of the house, even to church on Sunday; never goes gadding about at the neighbors’ houses, or talking from one to another; has been one of the best of wives and brothers, and is always at home.” The superintendent of the Hartford Retreat for the insane (from the report of which institution this case is taken), in commenting on it, says; “This appreciative husband could hardly have furnished a more graphic delineation of the causes of his wife’s insanity had he understood them ever so thoroughly.” The Acting-Governor of Queensland has received a cable message from the Secretary of State for the Colonies inquiring into the truth of the report that four or five labor vessels are being fitted out to recruit laborers from New Guinea for the Queensland plantations. The Acting-Governor replied, pointing out that in the present state of the law no legal impediment existed to recruiting laborers from New Guinea; nor, so long as it remains, within the terms of the Pacific Islanders Act of 1880, an island in the Pacific Ocean which is not in Her Majesty’s dominions nor within the jurisdiction of any foreign Power, could traffic be interfered with, were it engaged in by any enterprising skipper. He added that the annexation of New Guinea, when once confirmed, and the island made part of Her Majesty’s dominions, would render recruiting illegal.

Mr Dargaville, M.H.R., in a recent address to his constituents, said “ When the proposal was made to borrow the million for the North Island railway, the question arose how it was to be applied or invested in the meantime. He (Mr Dargaville) pointed out that it could be deposited with the six banks trading in the Colony, on the practice which obtains in New South Wales and Victoria. Exception was taken to this proposal, and he was told that it could not be done, and that he would not propose such a thing if he were not a tyro in politics, and so on. If that had been done, the monej, which they have borrowed at 4 per cent., could have been deposited at 5 or 6 percent,, making a profit on the money. New South Wales had done this recently, but when he proposed it he was pooh-poohed. Almost the first commandment in the political decalogue of some New Zealand members was this: ‘ Thou shalt have none other bank but one.’ ” The ‘Nelson Colonist ’ sniffs in the air a movement among the Otago members to bring about separation, unless they can secure for Otago absolute and indisputable ascendency over the rest of the island. It says:—“ The unholy alliance entered into between its members and those of Canterbury contemplates stifling our claims and those of all the northern parts of the island for railway extension by imposing special taxation that would make ruin the price, Otago is the chief seat of this pernicious movement, and the motive is undoubtedly money. The advocates of separation are becoming desperate. They show signs of so far abating their demands as to be willing to accept what they call financial separation; hut it is precisely in that our main danger lies. Checked by the North, there is a possibility their nefarious designs may be thwarted. Otherwise, Nelson would be helpless in the hands of the spoilers. Mr Bathgate discloses without disguise Otago’s aims, and it behoves the rest of the Colony to take warning. ”

Mr C. J. Toxward, of Wellington, &ah been appointed Dan fob Uoubul for the Colony. Two requisitions calling on the Mayor of South Dunedin to resign have been nignied in the Borough. ... ' • Captain Hofity Orbell, of tbe W«fto\!&Ui Rifles, h&sbefen Wtnc unattached list with th’e Wok t)lMajor. "*f r bishop Reunion, of Adelaide, lately, rfc* ceivcd (anonymously) a tutu of iflbittuy to enable him to buy a carriage &nd horses.

Miller has received the full stakes For hib glove contest with L. Foley, despite the astounding decision of the umpire that the affair was a draw. Reuter last week reported t&e death of Colonel Surfcftby'k VhVaelrb of Ride to" Khiva.” This was a mistake. It is Major(General E. 8. Burnaby who is deceased, The Supreme and Resident Magistrate’s Courts are to be heated and ventilated according to Asbury’s patent. Pipes are at the present time being laid throughout the buildings for the purpose. The new Commission Of who does not appear to have been carefully revised, as our Oam&rU contemporary points out that it contains the name of C. E. Smith, who has been dead for several years. The Dunediu Athenamm Committee held their monthly meeting last night, but the business was mostly of ft routine character. The question of issuing family tickets was discussed, but no decision was come to.

A wealthy Victorian squatter named John Dixon, Wydeloakie, died recently heat VVyckliffe, and left L 20.000 to the Theo--logioal College of Presbyterian College, LIO.OOO to Ormond College. L 5,000 to Presbyterian Ladies’ College.

A man without arms was brought up at Geelong last week, charged by his wife with using threatening language. She said she was afraid of her life and for her children, and often had to sit up all night to protect the latter from accused. He attacked them with his teeth.

The ‘ Post,* Writing on the recent appointments to the Upper House of Messrs Richmond and Barnicoat, advised the translation of Mr A. de B. Brandon to the Council also, and, presto ! the thing is done. Wellington has now eleven seats in that Cltamoer, Auckland seven, Canterbury eight, hnd Otago eleven. A meeting of ministers and representatives of churches of t)unedm and suburbs was held at the First Church lecture-hall at 3.30 p.m. to-day, to receive and confer upon the report of the deputation appointed at the conference recently held on “ Bible-teaching in the common schools,” and to determine upon the course to be followed. The Rev. Dr Stuart occupied the chair, and about thirty gentlemen were present. We hold Dvet otto report.

One of the.fnPßfc c’irio’fts Ventures of late (says ‘ Trtithis the prospectus of the V Bine Ribbon Beverage Company. Limited. ” Tho capital is L 50.000. (me chairman is Baron E. G. de Smisßfen de Gortenberg, and the company proposes to commence proceedings by giving to Percy Robinson L4,so for his plant, as a going manufacture “Bine Ribbon champ&gnfe” and other such enticing, uitboVigh non* intoxicating, beverage?). A Mrs BroWn h&s been getting into trouble while On tor travels in Sydnpy. It appears that fcbe offered a tram guard 2d in lieu of 3d, the proper fare; and, putting the cobpera on the desired the conductor to take them or go away. An altercation ensiled, and Mr Brown was induced to “go for” that “owdashus ” guard. Mrs Baown was subsequently fined 40s and costs, and Brown—he had to go to gaol for one month for the asfhult.

Many people are asking why Mr Holmes, member for Christchurch, spoke of Mr Postlethwait, member for Geraldine, as “a boneless creature.” The following remarks that were made by the latter in his recent addrej-s may supply the answer. Speaking of our representatives, he said, some thought and worke quietly, and some were always gabbling. Some members when they started to talk cleared the House ; members would not stop to listen to them. They Were powerful of speech, but powerless in everything else, and members would do more good if they said less and thought more.

This is what occurred at Plymouth, England, after a speech from “General” Booth, of the Salvation Army “ A roughlooking bulky man stepped forward in a dilapidated jersey and trousers to correspond, and related the blessings he had experienced as a result of his conversion. Suddenly before the audience, the man loosened two or three strings, kicked off the jersey and trousers, and stood confessed in the smart uniform of the Army—trim, orderly, and respectable. This circus trick had a wonderful effect upon the audience. There was at first a murmur of surprise, and then a chorus of * Hallelujahs ’ from all parts of the meeting.” Mr A, C. Gifiord, son of the Rev. Mr Gifford, of Oamaru, has received the appointment of mathematical master at the Waitaki High School. There were fifteen applicants. The ‘North Otago Times ’ mentions that Mr Gifford has had a very distinguished mathematical career. He was educated at Oamaru and at St. Chad’s College, Denstohe, Thence he proceeded 1 6 St. John’s College, Cambridge* where he was elected to a sizarship, and afterwards to a foundation mathematical scholarship. He has just gained the Herschell mathematical priee—a high university distinction. Mr Gifford is also an athlete, and is captain of St. John’s College Football Club.

'• A decision of some importance to holders of publicans’ licenses was given by Major Keddell, R.M., at Clyde a few days since. A man was charged under the 143 rd section of the Licensing Act, 1882, with being drunk on licensed premises. Accused was in a bedroom in the hotel, yet, notwithstanding, he was apprehended by the police; and there were circumstances surrounding the case which made it perfectly justifiable on the part of the police to arrest him. A conviction was obtained. The section quoted above reads “ Every person found drunk in any highway or other publio place, whether a building or not, or any licensed premises, may be apprehended,” etc. The Appeal Court have confirmed the conviction of the prisoner Conner, tried at the recent criminal sittings at Christchurch, for burglary and larceny. The former charge was abandoned during the trial, but the jn y brought in a general verdict of “Gnilty,” and were discharged. Next day the Judge recalled them, and ascertained that the ver’ict was intended to refer only to the charge of larceny. The Court, without going into the question as to whether recalling the jury was a proper proceeding, held that as the Judge had a minute m writing of the abandonment of the burglary count, he was at liberty to alter the finding upon the indictment in accordance with the intention.

A remarkable feat of horsemanship is recorded by the ‘Riverina Star,’ which alleges that a Mr Charles Brown rode from Four-bob Creek to Humbng Creek (rather suggestive), a distance of 150 miles, in fourteen hours. This in itself (remarks the ‘Star’) would have been a great feat if relays of horses had been ready for him at the different stations; but when it is remembered that no previous intimation had been given along the route, and that at the changes the horses had to be run up from paddocks, it makes the performance a truly marvellous one. Mr Brown was in the saddle only ten hours, riding seven horses, which goes to show that he must have ridden the whole way at the rate of fifteen miles per hour. About a quarter past eleven o’clock last evening Mr R. Malcolm, messenger of the Bank of Australasia, discovered a fire in the Dunedin Savings Bank Buildings, next to the Royal Exchange Hotel, in High street. The Fire Brigade and Salvage Corps promptly turned out, and the fire, which was confined to the office of Mr A. W. Morris, was speedily extinguished. The damage done was trifling, being limited to the floor, which apparently had become ignited from a fire left alight by Mr Morris. Credit is due to the police for their prompt appearance on the scene and preventing a number of people who collected before the arrival of the Fire Brigade from foolishly trying to effect an entrance into the building by breaking the windows. The premises are insured for L 1,750 with the National Company.

. -|drs Bland Holt (Misa Lena Edwin) died ■ atffielbnnrne on tbeSlst ult. . Btbearsal ,to motroft evening tor Muoical tFnionCDnceru -v- jhe jumped oft the pieir at P6rt Ohalraera and ftSoUed from drowning Andrew fillet, a man belonging to the ship WelUbsWn, . Mr j. T. Bkt*aifb, whose peculiar writing in tfto ‘Lyell Argus’ made that little journal famous throughout the Colony, has rejoined the «gpQsequUl. Aimy..^He, prietorof Bay Argus, 8 pubHdiecray 1 w ... »• n. m , .'• * • Thi AUllrkllad Mefftahtde tTblba idsnrihee* Company, who had a risk. of. Ll.tJuuon. JaoobaVi mpwwairwMrisVeiiurbb. wera ; Wiifl»^ed w f0r,L1,200: in the Mutual, Flrb Insh&hde Association, aud Australian Alliance Companies for LlOu hacn, keeping themselves only L4CO.

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The Evening Star. TUESDAY, JUNE 12, 1883. Evening Star, Issue 6314, 12 June 1883

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