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QUISLING'S FATE

CONTROVERSY IN NORWAY

I Rfcc. 12.50 p.m. LONDON, June 3. Quisling's fate is the subject of increasing controversy in Norway, where there has been no execution since 1876, states the 'Daily Telegraph's" Oslo correspondent. There is opposition in some quarters to a decree passed by the Norwegian Government in London in 1942 under which traitors can be executed. Bishop Bergrave, Bishop of Oslo, who is the head of the Norwegian Church, in a published article, opposes the execution of Quisling on religious and humanitarian grounds, despite his own resistance to the Germans, who once imprisoned him. Dr. Scharfenberg, a distinguished physician and a prominent resistance leader, also opposes the execution on humanitarian grounds. The correspondent points out that Quisling could have been shot under military law, but the case is now under civil jurisdiction. Mr. Paul Berg, president of the Supreme Court, stated that be would probably preside at' the trial of Quisling, and that he was prepared to implement the death decree. • , There is a strong feeling that Quisling is mad, and some people urge his committal to a criminal lunatic asylum. Trials of other collaborators are proceeding. * Two of Quislings right-hand men, the former Oslo police chief, Bernhard Askvig, and a leading pro-Nazi editor, Henry Endsjoe, underwent preliminary interrogation i> an Oslo court, says the British United Press correspondent in Oslo. Both were nervous under a barrage of questions. The Court remanded them for trial in October.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19450604.2.80

Bibliographic details

QUISLING'S FATE, Evening Post, Volume CXXXIX, Issue 130, 4 June 1945

Word Count
241

QUISLING'S FATE Evening Post, Volume CXXXIX, Issue 130, 4 June 1945

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