Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

ELECTION CAMPAIGN NOTES

Clean and Fair.

At the conclusion of a recent meeting held in Kilbirnie by the National Party candidate for Wellington East, Mr. L. T. Jacobsen, one of the audienc.e took the opportunity of congratulating the candidate on the clean tone of his speech ,and the general tenor of fair play shown to his opponent. The speaker suggested that | this was a definite refutation of the statement that this was going to be a "dirty" election. The Maori People. "I come before you as an Independent because I believe that Maori problems should not be treated on party lines," said Lieutenant J. P. Tikao-Barrett, M.C., when opening his campaign for the Southern Maori seat against the Hon. E. P. Tirikatene, M.P. "The only pledge I will make," ihe declared, "is that on any major issue I promise to come back to you, my people, for direction." "New Zealand at War." The booklet, "New Zealand at War," issued this week by the Director of Publicity, was described by Mr. Will Appleton, National candidate for Wellington Central, at his meeting last night, as "flagrant propaganda for Labour from beginning to end." "Here is another case of extravagant use of the taxpayers' money to put out propaganda for themselves," he said. "They limit us in the amount'of propaganda we can put out. It must have cost pounds and pounds to put it together, and it is nothing more or less than absolute arrant propaganda. I publicly protest about such tactics at the present time. (Hear, hear.) There j are two pages-by Mr. Fraser, and they are delivering it today through the Post Office, again at the public, expense. The Labour Party ought to have sufficient funds from the money dragged out of the people in the way of union fees to pay for their own propaganda." Union Rule. "Taken by and large, the Labour Party exists for three big unions, the freezing workers, the watersiders, and the coal miners," said Mr. R. M. Algie, opening his National candidature for Remuera. "These three unions rule New Zealand. That is sectionalism and that is wrong. If you are going to govern a country you must govern for the people as a whole, regardless of class or calling." Civilian Needs. i In some cases from 50 to 80 per cent, of the products of New Zealand industry had had to go into the war. machine in the past year or two, said the Minister of Supply (Mr. Sullivan), at North Beach, Christchurch, when referring to shortages of goods for civilians. - "I am glad to say, as I have been very much troubled over the situation:, that with the Japanese menace receding we can devote a greater proportion of our factories, .machinery, and man-power to the production of goods for the civilian population, and instructions have been "given to that effect," added the Minister. "I think in the year to come, and progressively then onwards, that the civilian population will have more supplies than has been the case recently." The Value of Money. v Under the Labour Government's regime, said- Mr. Will Appleton, National , candidate for Wellington •Central, in the St. John' Ambulance Hall last night, the real value of the pound note had been reduced to about 12S 6d. After the candidate had made this claim twice, a member of the audience sought to try Mr. Appleton out.; "I'll give you 12s 6d for a pound," .he said. "If you give me > 12s 6d. worth of real money I'll give you a pound," retorted Mr.. Appleton. He added: "You give me 12s 6d worth of goods on the basis of the value of goods before Labour came into office, and I'll give you £1 for them." There was no response from the member of the audience. » Heckler Dealt Wifh. An otherwise decorous meeting held by the Prime Minister (Mr. Fraser) at Te Maramatanga Christian Society's marae at Kai Iwi was in danger of interruption when a heckler got up along the building behind the / Prime Minister while he was speaking. The heckler had begun to make rude noises when a well-aimed clod caught him broadside on, and he retired in a hurry to the rear to rejoin the other fowls. i Should Start at Home. "Too long has Newtown been referred to and thought of as a slum area, and it is to the shame of the present sitting member that these conditions exist while he blandly .talks about State housing. Let him start at home," said Private C. Teece in Newtown last night. Broadcasts and Fees. On the subject of broadcasting, Mr. C. M. Bowdeh, National candidate, speaking last evening at Karori West, stated that he favoured amalgamation of both national and commercial services, and said that the National Party proposed to reduce the licence fees payable. The misuse of the radio service for political propaganda would be discontinued. He favoured the. continuance of Parliamentary broadcasts, and anticipated a better tone from the new Parliament. Challenge to Mr. Nash. A challenge to the Minister of Finance (Mr. Nash) to appear on the same platform during the course of the election campaign to state their respective views on the Government's financial policy and answer questions, which, he said, he had conveyed to the Minister by letter three weeks ago following a suggestion by many of the constituents, has been repeated by Mr. J. Hogan, Independent candidate for Hutt. "I offered to make any such arrangement to suit Mr. Nash's convenience, and his engagements outside the elecorate. since he is apparently an absentee candidate as well as an absentee representative," states Mr. Hogan. "I now publicly challenge him to debate these vitally important matters with me before the electors of Hutt, and lam willing-to make my booking of the King George Theatre, Lower Hutt, during the final week of the campaign, available for this purpose, at my own' expense." The Returned Man. "The experience at the .end of the last war showed that cheers for the returned men were plentiful, but jobs and houses were scarce," said Mr. P. G. Connolly, Labour candidate for Dunedin West, at Kaikorai. "We know that the cheers will still be plentiful at the end of this war, and it will be for the Government to see that jobs and houses are plentiful, too." - . "Drones" in Parliament. "Otago is going back while the North Island is prospering. Why? Because our members of Parliament have done absolutely nothing to foster the life of our community," said Mr. A. L. S. Cassie, National Party candidate for Dunedin North, at Port Chalmers. "That is a serious charge to make, but you all know that it is perfectly true. Our members of Parliament have been suffering from sleeping sickness for many years. We are represented by drones who have done nothing for the province in which they earned their daily bread." Otago would not advance until the electors sent to Parliament men of vision and ability to manage their affairs. ; Use of Broadcasting. "As a candidate I am just as much entitled to broadcast over the air as Mr. Peter Fraser," declared Mr. Will Appleton, National candidate for Wellington Central, at his meeting last night. He said he agreed with the protest made by the Independents over the allocation, of the radio broadcasting facilities during the election campaign. Dealing with the radio broadcasting policy generally, Mr. Appleton said that under the National Party, there would be no "political taint," and the broadcasting services would be amalgamated under one head, and would be under a commission, free from political control, in the same way as the 8.8.C. was in Britain. The National Party would not build radio palaces and listeners would receive a substantial reduction in the .licence fee.

Torch of Democracy.

"To maintain our. standard of living as high as it is today, thousands .of gallant New Zealanders, along with the young men of other countries, have given their lives, but they have passed on the torch of democracy," said Mr. P. G. Connolly, Labour candidate for Dunedin West. "The peace will present many problems, and it will require men of vision and determination if we are going to have that new order which will eliminate what we have gone through during the last four years." "Throwing Cold Water." To stress a point that he was making in an address at Napier, the Prime Minister (Mr. Fraser), in waving his hand, caught the top of a water jug on the table and the whole of the contents went flying into the lap of Mr. Hercock, the Mayor, who was presiding. The house greeted the incident with loud laughter. "I don't like throwing cold water on anybody," said Mi*. Fraser. "I certainly don't like I throwing cold water on my chairman; in fact, I don't like anyone throwing cold water on my scheme. The chairman assures me that he was not in objection to what I was saying," added the Prime Minister, amid more laughter. Despite his discomfiture Mr. Hercock sat out the rest of the meeting. Mr. Fraser added that this was the first incident of its kind during his career as a public speaker. Monetary Policy. "There has never been one word of order or instruction come to this Government about its monetary policy. Nobody has ever told us what to do, and if they did we wouldn't. do it," said the Minister of Finance (Mr. Nash), at Invercargill this week. Through the Reserve Bank the Government always completely controlled the currency of New Zealand. The trading banks co-operated with the Government. All the profits from the Reserve Bank came back to the State. He could give plenty of valid reasons why the Government need not take over the trading banks.

P.A. FEILDING, This Day. The body of C. E. Robinson, single, a carrier, was found hanging in his garage workshop yesterday. Robinson was the victim of a collision with a train some months ago and suffered most severe injuries.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19430904.2.68

Bibliographic details

ELECTION CAMPAIGN NOTES, Evening Post, Volume CXXXVI, Issue 57, 4 September 1943

Word Count
1,667

ELECTION CAMPAIGN NOTES Evening Post, Volume CXXXVI, Issue 57, 4 September 1943

Working