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DEARTH OF STAYERS

POSITION IN ENGLAND

"Following the retirement to the stud of Owen Tudor, the poverty of our present-day long-distance performers becomes more apparent," comments an English Writer. "At a modest estimate the four-year-olds and upwards are a stone at least inferior to those in training during the pre-war era. No one need be surprised at the decline. It is a natural outcome. Lack of interest and enterprise on the part of the governing'authorities is stifling initiative and choking at -birth ideas of those flirting with the notion of racing and breeding to produce stayers. Since the current season opened, of the 312 races decided only ten have been over a distance exceeding a mile and a half, and only three beyond two miles. At one period of the campaign ten metings took place, and in not a solitary event was the genuine type of stayer catered, for. Surely this is an alarming position and calls for the closest Investigation. It certainly shakes one's faith in the future."

A Former Rider.— The death occurred in Palmerston North last month of Mr. C. J. (Caesar) Robinson, who was at one period actively associated with racing. He served his apprenticeship with P. J. Reardon, when this trainer was quartered in Blenheim, but. completed his apprenticeship at Awapuni under R. E. Hatch and for-a^ number of years was quite a prominent rider, both on the flat and later over fences. Later he acted as trainer to Mr. T. Peterson and Mr. T F. Relling, of Palmerston North, while he raced in his own colours a product of Lapidary and Azecta. As Balbus this horse promised to go much further, but broke a shoulder- while in training in 1936, and shortly afterwards Mr. Robinson retired from the game.

New Quarters.—The former Takanini trainer D. J. Burgess, who is now quartered at Otaki. signalled his entry into local circles by winning the Wharangi Hack Handicap with First Edition, a racy-looking gelding by Kincardine from Sunny Sky, the dam being by Hunting Song trom Sunny Roe.

First 'Winner.— The first two-year-old winner of the season, Balfron, is a bay colt from the imported mare Legality, who was by Noblesse Oblige Earlier members of the family to perform prominently were Bambury, Whirling, and Marshall Hall. Lord Luck, who won the second division pi the Pioneer Handicap, is a chestnut gelding by Cambria Park from Carmelia, a dam by Bronze Eagle from the Potoa mare Pebble Beach, the second of the progeny of imported Pebble II Brilliant.— Race Away showed all his old brilliance among the open sprinters at Otaki, but was finished with a long way from home. Unfortunately opportunities for contesting scurry events do not come the way of horses in the higher division. Disappointed.— Based on her running on the first day of the Wanganui Meeting, Sea Quex looked a likely prospect oh the later Saturday, bu) she failed. Again at Otaki she disappointed when, after having every chance, she could not do better than fourth. She may not be as good as was first thought. Bad Run.— After drawing wide out in ihe hack seven at Otaki, Straight Left was off the course the whole way. He was pinched slightly turning for home and a check two furlongs from home cost him what chance he had.

Retired.— By his convincing Gold Cup success Mrs. Macdonald-Buchan-ati's,Owen Tudor proved himself a worthy Derby winner. He has now been retired to the" stud to carry on his great sire line. Owen Tudor was Fred. Darling's first Gold Cup winner, and Gordon Richards's second. The rider scored on the Aga Khan's Felicitation eight years ago. Coming North.—Tutere, the novice winner at Ashburton, is on the easy list at present, but it is intended to have him racing at the Wellington Meeting later in the month. Showed Speed.—The Man's Pal — Pink Link three-year-old Pallid is stated to have shown a lot of speed at Ashburton, but he vyas green. His dam is a sister to a high-class horse in Kinnoull, so he should make good. Good Family.—Foxleap, who is due to make her debut at the Dunedin Meeting,-is a three-year-old filly by Fojcbridge from Stout Heart, a sister to Cricket Bat and Ball Dress. She is a member of H. and A. Cutts's team at Riccarton.

"Improving. —Northern reports state that Yes Tor has made marked headway during the past month. She has shown ability to handle heavy going, and should be worth keeping in mind. She is by Leighon from Duchess's Daughter, who is by Captain Bunsby from the Australian-bred Duchess Eudo.rus.

Failed. —Scottish Dale, favourite for the Squatters' Handicap at Geraldine last Saturday, had no chance with All Night, who won rather easily. The latter would be a high-class performer, if he were thoroughly sound. Nevertheless, the outing should be of benefit to Scottish Dale.

Set the Pace. —Having his first outing for some considerable time, Royal Lancer set a solid pace in the early stages of the Geraldine Cup, but drifted over the closing stages. The race should sharpen him up for future engagements. Big Stake.—The New Zealand Trotting Cup will, carry a stake of £2850, including a gold cup valued at £100. The winner's share will be £1550, second horse £650, third £425, and fourth £225. Nomination and acceptance fees amount to £24.

Faded. —After his run in the John Grigg Stakes Warrigal was a firm favourite for the Raukapuka Hack Handicap at Geraldine. With 101b less to carry than he had at Ashburton, he was close up in a fast-run race, ■ but after being well enough placed after straightening vp for -home he made a poor finish.

On Right Lines.—Scottish Air, winner of the Geraldine Trot last Saturday, should go to greater heights for her breeder, Mr. J. R. McKenzie. She is by U. Scott from Air Flow, an imported American trotter who beat the pacers on more than one occasion on the Canterbury tracks.

Surprised.—Eulogist caught students of form napping at Geraldine last Saturday when he won the Geraldine Cup. Last season he won the Criterion Handicap at Riccarton in lmin 24 l-ssec, and the other runners found it beyond their power to pull him back on Saturday.

Good Effort.—Restlessness at the barder has counted against Desert Maid in. her racing. At the Otago Hunt Meeting she refused to start, and at Geraldine she was badly left. Despite the handicap she raced through the field and finally won going away. Naturally, her dividend was a good one. A Reminder.—Owners and trainers are reminded that nominations for the Masterton meeting, to be held at Otaki on October 17, close on Monday at 9 p.m., and the Wellington Spring Meeting on Monday at 5 p.m.

Long History.—Racing in the Geraldine district, dates back to 1864. Meetings were held at Pleasant Valley in August and near Temuka in December. The first cup meeting at Geraldine was staged in 1875, and the only break in continuity occurred in 1898. Early meetings were run on . courses flagged .off in private paddocks; later a plough track was laid off on the Raukapuka estate, and then in the eighties a transfer was made to Orari.

Brightened.—Although she had looked a trifle war-worn when previously seen in action, Lady Virginia came up bright and fresh at Otaki, and the Inflation mare went very close to winning the hack seven furlongs She was always in the van and was fighting it out with First Edition over the final pinch when W. J, Eroughton appeared to drop his hands just a trifle prematurely. On a Par.—lt is interesting to note that when Bolinbrooke won the 10,000 dollars Manhattan Handicap in America he ran the mile and a half in the race-record time of 2min 27 3-ssec, which is practically identical with the record for that distance in ihis quarter of the globe. The record holder in the, Southern Hemisphere is Palfresco, who won at Caulfield in October, 1935, in 2min 27 3-4 sec. Palfresco was then a three-year-old and carried 7.1.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19421003.2.19.1

Bibliographic details

DEARTH OF STAYERS, Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 82, 3 October 1942

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1,339

DEARTH OF STAYERS Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 82, 3 October 1942

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