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POSTSCRIPTS

' Chronicle and Comment

BY PERCY FLAGE Labour belaboured." «■ * * And now what about getting on .vith the war? HARIHAHA. * * i * Mr. H T/. Nathan in particular would hsx " last laugh 01. Saturday evening. * * * More red ta*. the only' thing that could make thi. nntry wave the white flag. « * * An opera company a performance of "William TeL 'in Madrid. It was lavishly produced, William shooting an onion off his son's head. * * * POSSIBLE EXPLANATION. There was a young fellow called Hess Who found himself quite in a mess.; Said he, "Nothing's surer, I'll be bumped by the Fuhrer— I'll hop it to Britain, I guess." ; N.F.W. * » « 1 MUSSO'S TUM-TUM. II Duce's stomach trouble—a real thing—is of the type aggravated by : worry, so it is fair to assume that he is living on a milk diet, Recent photographs received in Johannesburg show that he is losing weight, a process that obviously is steadily accelerating. With a pain in his "tummy," i a pain in the neck, and a perpetual I headache, Mussolini has still to swal- ; low the bitterest pill so far —the complete loss of Ethiopia. , ♦ «• # NO GROUCHING. Dear Mr. P. Flage,—l read the rather ' silly letter of "Builder" in Thurs- | day's column. I might ask him to [ read his schedule properly. In mine, ; which I know is the same as his, it ! says: "If the value of work done is less , than the expenses of operation, please '. give brief outline of cause in remarks j section overleaf." There is a remarks section for this. Also, last year I made a loss owing ' to rising costs, but I filled in my form. ', lam still plodding along. The lads '. overseas are losing more than us, but , are they grouching? That's my point of view, and I'm sure others will agree . with me. Also, if "Builder" must ' witlessly complain, why not go to the right quarter? ONE WHO GRINS AND NOT GROUCHES. * * # SIAMESE TWINS. Thailand (nee Siam) has been, as you know, in the war news at intervals. Away back in 1811, while it still was Siam, it made, a name for itself by producing the original Siamese twins. Their names were Chang and Eng. They lived with their parents until 1829, when a seacaptain took them to New York, where they were ex- " hibited. When they retired from pub- . lie life with a considerable fortune they settled in North Carolina, U.S. ' They adopted the name of Bunker— 1 Chang and Eng Bunker. In 1843 they - married two sisters. They owned ad- > joining farms, and lived alternately ,on each farm. Chang became father of ten children and Eng had a family [of twelve. Their mode of life was a 1 compromise, each being the dominat- > ing personality for a week in rotation. t Chang died first and Eng died immei diately after from syncope induced by [ terror. * * # I VIKING SPIRIT. ' Although the Norwegian freighter ', Keret sank within thirty seconds ! when torpedoed by a German sub- | marine in the Atlantic, a few members of the crew escaped drowning by cling- ' ing to a raft which broke loose from ; the sinking ship. As the survivors lay 1 tossing upon heavy seas, the U-boat approached them. ; "What ship was that we torpedoed?" "Keret, of Bergen." "How many tons?" 1 "Twenty-one hundred." ; "Thanks and goodbye!" And the 1 submarine disappeared. 1 Shortly afterwards a British destroyer sighted the floating raft and came ; alongside. But the Norwegians were , not concerned with being rescued. : "Go after the U-boat first! We can wait." For eight hours the sailors waited— in the wintry north Atlantic. Then the destroyer returned, after locating and sinking the submarine, and rescued the patient .Vikings. * # # WINSTON CHURCHILL. We've the leader men adore In good Winston. , Our sheet-anchor in the war Is old Winston; For he's true-blue, through ana through, Search from China to Peru, There's no other like unto Brainy Winston. Does he ever take affright, This chap, Winston? No, sir, never in a fight, Not old Winston. Go the battle slick or slow, He'll deliver blow on blow Till he's battered down the foe: Bulldog Winston. In the dark days of Dunkirk, Who but Winston Rallied us with flashing dirk, . Plucky Winston. At top speed, evolved a plan; Soon restored our lost elan: This big, brave, true Englishman, Winston Churchill. C.L. * . * * A POOLE REMINISCENCE. Mr. Charles Poole died in California last December and was cremated. His ashes were interred in Auckland last week. It is almost forgotten that Mr. Poole was M.H.R. for Auckland West as a Seddonite. In a reminiscent mood Tom L. Mills writes: I well remember Charlie Poole, an aggressive young Irishman with a period of Canadian experience before coming on to New Zealand, where he became an ardent leader of the Prohibition Party. He was anathema to the Antis. In his first session in the House he was chosen by Premier Seddon to second the Address in Reply. I was lending a pencil for "'The Post" in the Gallery that night and have not forgotten the high light in that full-dress debate before a packed gallery. Sitting just below the Irishman were two veteran West Coast cronies, who delighted in heckling members suspect of oratorical ambitions. One of the pair assumed a slumbrous pose when the tiro caught Mr. Speaker's eye. Presently, Mac opened his eyes, looked up, and exclaimed: "Hello, you still speaking!" More shut-eye, another awakening, then: '"What! Hello, 'you still speaking!" Ten minutes later a third exclamation: "Hell' Still speaking!" Mr Poole had continued the even tenor of his-way until'that third break. Then he stopped,! Mac and all the world listened as with his accentuated drawl the member for AuckI land West, spacing his words, retorted: "The member for is talking in his slc?p" (Lou'i laughter.) Mac. !■•'., :r ~r?~"i -m-'7 _'h=»r]ie Pcole.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19410519.2.44

Bibliographic details

POSTSCRIPTS, Evening Post, Volume CXXXI, Issue 116, 19 May 1941

Word Count
963

POSTSCRIPTS Evening Post, Volume CXXXI, Issue 116, 19 May 1941

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