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THE ONE THOUSAND

SUCCESS OF APPRENTICE

(By Air Mail. From "The Post's" London Representative.) LONDON, May 7. Much to the general surprise of Turf patrons, Lord Astor's Golden Penny was beaten easily by Mr. Esmond Harmsworth's Godiva in the New One Thousand Guineas at Newmarket. Godiva was ridden by a 17-year-old Lincoln apprentice named D. Marks, who has had little race riding experience, though he rode the horse in all her outings last year. The champion, Gordon Richards, was on the favourite. Mr. Harmsworth. a son of Lord Rothermere, bred Godiva, who is by Hyperion out of Carpet Slipper, by Phalaris. In view of this very gratifying achievement it was somewhat disappointing that he could not get to Newmarket to see the classic, the first he has won. Lord Astor, who, too, is a newspaper owner, has had many important successses on the Turf, but the classics seem to elude him. The Guineas field was made up of eleven runners. Godiva is a horse not easily handled at the starting gate, and when Mr. Harmsworth was informed that the principal jockeys would all have engagements in the race he decided to give Marks his chance. Godiva is the second winner of the One Thousand Guineas trained by W. R. Jarvis. The other was Scuttle, owned by King George V. . Godiva was drawn on the stands side and had the advantage of racing towards her stable. She and Lyric raced all the way wide of the others, who were in the centre of the course. The leader of that group for five furlongs was Drawing Prize, stable companion to the odds-on favourite, Golden Penny. Gordon Richards on Golden 'Penny drew ahead of the main bunch going into the dip, but Godiva was still going smoothly by herself, with an occasional swish of her tail. Marks took a glance over his shoulder at Richards, who by this time was hard at work. But the boy was not to be flurried. He rode home with his hands, and Godiva at the finish was drawing further away from Golden Penny, who was beaten by five lengths, with Sir. Malcolm McAlpine's Allure third. , Godiva had run third in the Middle Park Stakes to Djebel . and Tant Mieux last season, so there was every reason for thinking she might be an unusually good three-year-old. = Her time, lmin 40 3-ssec, was two seconds faster than that recorded by Djebel in the Two Thousand Guineas. Her only remaining classic engagement is the Oaks. Godiva paid great credit to the French colt, Djebel, winner of the Two Thousand Guineas. Some people were a little dubious because she swishes her tail a great deal, giving the impression that she is not in love with racing. But she forgets about her tail at the "off." Many sound judges held that Godiva, in her third to Djebel and Tant Mieux a year ago in the "Two-

Year-Old Derby," was entitled to be regarded as the best of her sex, arguing that Golden Penny's abilities were not so well established. This judgment proved correct. Marks's father, speaking of his son, said: "Douglas was crazy about horses when at school and used to ride a. hack whenever he could. As I was receiving a disablement pension since the last war, I thought T would write to the Prince of* Wales (now the Duke of Windsor) and ask if he; could do anything towards getting Douglas in a stable. He saw Mr. Jarvis on the matter, and that is how the boy came to be at Egertpn House. I have several letters from the Duke of Windsor framed at home." .

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19400601.2.183

Bibliographic details

THE ONE THOUSAND, Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 129, 1 June 1940

Word Count
605

THE ONE THOUSAND Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 129, 1 June 1940

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