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OBITUARY

MR. PATRICK KEOGH

(Special to the "Evening Post.") DUNEDIN, This Day.

Mr. Patrick Keogh, who was acknowledged as one of the greatest players of Rugby football in the history of New Zealand, died yesterday afternoon at Dunedin.

After playing junior football for a season or two, Mr. Keogh was promoted to the Kaikorai senior team as outside scrum half-back and soon demonstrated his ability as a player. He was outstanding in the three matches played at Dunedin between Otago and Stoddart's English team on the 1888 tour. Mr. Keogh put to good use the lessons imparted by the visitors, particularly the "dummy" pass, which Stoddart's men were first to introduce to New Zealand footballers, and in the final game he actually "caught" visiting players with this tactic. In all his movements on the field he was materially assisted by his strong physique and his lightness on his feet.

Although Mr. Keogh had no Maori blood in his veins, he had a swarthy complexion and his appearance, coupled with the fame he had already achieved on the football field, prompted the managers of the Maori football team to invite him to take part in the British tour. On this memorable tour the team, consisting of only 25 players, put up the Remarkable achievement, in the light of present-day policy, of playing 74 matches in the period from October 3, 1888, until March 27, 1889. The tourists won 49 games, drew five, and lost 20. Mr. Keogh was one of the outstanding backs of the team, and he played against Otago at Carisbrook on the return to New Zealand of the Maoris, when he stood out by his clever dodging and passing. In the following year he played again for Otago, and then dropped out of the game, leaving behind him a brilliant record which is often quoted.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19400313.2.108

Bibliographic details

Evening Post, Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 62, 13 March 1940

Word Count
307

OBITUARY Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 62, 13 March 1940

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