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PETROL RATIONING

MOVES FOR ECONOMY

MILK DISTRIBUTION

ACTION IN CITIES

Among the effects of petrol rationing which have become noticeable since the restrictions were reimposed on a stricter basis at the beginning of February, probably the most striking has been the recognition by many large organisations of the economies in working that can be achieved with-, out undue curtailment Of their services. It would be too much to expect the average concern to admit frankly that there has been wasteful use of petrol in the past, but the fact undoubtedly is that competition in numerous avenues of trade has led to overlapping and uneconomic working. This is particularly true of rural districts, where perhaps several bakers-or butchers have been dividing between them the business of a few houses in the same locality, possibly in the same street, but. in several of the cities the position is little better..

In Auckland the Milk Council has made a notable decision in agreeing to a request by the Government that districts not already zoned should be zoned by June 1. The chairman (Mr. I. J. Goldstine) said that in the districts already zoned the distance covered by venders had been reduced at least 18 miles to an average of five miles and in some cases as little as one and a half miles, with consequent great savings in petrol and other costs. ■ '. .'■ • ■ "■■'..'" ;

A similar response has been made in Christchurch, where the milk distributors have decided on a voluntary system of zoning. In both cities the decisions will involve the exchange of customers in many cases, but it is believed that in the circumstances the customers will accept the new arrangement in the proper spirit.

Wellington, with its municipal system supplying so much of the city and suburbs and involving an extensive use of horse-drawn vehicles, has not the same milk delivery problem from the aspect of petrol conservation as the other cities, but there are numerous other household requirements in the delivery of which petrol is regarded as essential. In these cases the majority of the organisations concerned have already taken steps to effect economies while maintaining a reasonable service. Economies which are being adopted* in some cases are the stopping of special deliveries and the exchanging of customers where this is practicable.

The rationalising of petrol station hours is another result of the restrictions which has much to recommend it from "the common-sense point of view, whatever may be the thoughts of the motorist who finds his car "out of gas" any appreciable distance from a source of supply.

Jfa country districts the economic value of the horse is rapidly being realised once more, and prices for horses have- risen in sympathy with the demand. Farmers who have been accustomed to using light trucks for certain seasonal work are reverting to horses and finding them as satisfactory as ever, and tradesmen in the rural areas who have retained their light delivery carts through the years are bringing them out from sheds and, using them to good advantage.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19400304.2.112

Bibliographic details

PETROL RATIONING, Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 54, 4 March 1940

Word Count
506

PETROL RATIONING Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 54, 4 March 1940

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