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JOCKEY DEFENDED

ASCOT CUP AFTERMATH

A remarkable defence of the veteran English jockey B. Carslake, formerly of Australia, was made by the prominent trainer George Lambton. after Carslake had been criticised for his riding of last year's St. Leger winner Scottish Union in the Ascot Gold Cup recently. Writing to the editor of the London "Sporting Life." Mr. Lambton referred to a statement published in a daily newspaper that "in the race Scottish Union pulled so hard that he eventually beat both himself and his jockey." He continued: "Carslake's reputation is so firmly established that he can afford to ignore such criticism, but there are many jockeys less famous to whom a statement'such as this might do great harm in their profession. "Now, I contend that Scottish Union was not beaten in the Ascot Cup because he pulled too hard, or because he beat his jockey. He was beaten because he was physically unable to gallop two miles and a half, and that was what the majority of racing people expected who had watched his past career and studied his breeding. RUNNING TOO FREELY. '•The race for the Ascot Cup was easy to read. When passing the stands for the first time it was evident that Scottish Union was running too freely for a horse that had to gallop two miles and a half, but, owing to the wise discretion of his jockey, he was allowed to settle down in front and run his own race, and, after going about a mile, he did settle down to nothing more than a good half-speed gallop, the ideal position for a jockey riding a brilliant horse of doubtful stamina.

"This continued until they were well round the turn into the straight, when Scottish Union cracked up in a few strides and was a hopelessly beaten horse, so hopelessly beaten that Carslake humanely refrained from riding him hard, not because he himself was tired, but for the reason that the horse had no struggle left in him.

"That is the story of the race, with which, I believe, the majority of experienced racing men will agree. I presume that the newspaper correspondent concerned saw the race for the Churchill Stakes on the opening day at Ascot, over two miles, when Carslake, riding Michoumy for Mr. ;J. V. Rank (owner of Scottish Union), won by a short head. I have seen i many great races ridden by famous jockeys, but I have never seen a greater combination of strength, *de- [ termination, and skill" than in this race. RIDER REPLACED. "I would not have thought it necessary to write this letter but .for the fact, now well known, that Mr. Rank replaced Carslake with another jockey on his horse in the Eclipse Stakes. That is, of course, a very serious reflection on the jockey. Mr. Rank, like any other owner, has the right to put up any jockey he chooses to engage, but owners of great horses, like any other public men, must be open to criticism.

"I will end this letter with a little anecdote of the Doncaster St. Leger Meeting last year. On Friday afternoon that week a well-known racing official said to me: 'Your jockey (my stable has first claim on Carslake) is the biggest thief in the world.' Taken aback, I asked him what he meant, and he replied: 'He has stolen three big races this week on Scottish Union, Epigram, and Michoumy.' All these horses are the property of Mr. Rank."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19390829.2.113.4

Bibliographic details

JOCKEY DEFENDED, Evening Post, Volume CXXVIII, Issue 51, 29 August 1939

Word Count
581

JOCKEY DEFENDED Evening Post, Volume CXXVIII, Issue 51, 29 August 1939

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