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A BREAK AT LAST

AGA KHAN'S LEAN SEASON

It may be true that racing is a rich man's game and that the big prizes go to the wealthy owners, but there have been two striking demonstrations in England this season that money cannot command success. It was not until Bello won a minor race at Manchester early in June that Lord Astor's colours were seen to the fore. An even longer losing run was ended at Birmingham a week later, when Stardust, a son of Hyperion, registered the year's first success for H.ri. Aga Khan, .following that success the Aga Khan's horses went through Ascoi and subsequent meetings in June without a further win, but Lord Astor had a win with Fulham at Ascot.

When the luck is awry, the best of jockeys and trainers can experience a thin time over a long period. But it is doubtful if there is any case on record of an owner with such a team as the Aga Khan possesses having runners in 48 races before a winner came along. In contrast, the Aga Khan's son, Prince Aly Khan, has been having quite a good season, and in one race at Ascot, the Coventry Stakes, for two-year-olds, he beat his father's horse (Jindani) with a horse (the Bahram colt Turkhan) whom the Aga Khan bred.

Since he began racing in England in 1921 the Aga Khan has laid out vast sums on his breeding establishments and hi training expenses, and the good fortune that attended him is summarised in the fact that he headed the list of winning owners six times in eight years, and seven times in all, his winnings being £551,193 up till the end of last season. In addition, further large amounts have been won in France, where he has always raced extensively during his association with racing in Europe. Compared with the prize-money secured by the most successful owners in Australia and New Zealand, the Aga Khan's total winnings appear to be stupendous, but the outlay is probably proportionately as great. He has in training in England no fewer than 50 horses this season, and they must be giving his trainer, Frank Butters, some anxious times.

His Highness's name was first associated with the Turf in England in 1922, when he won 13 races, worth £13,133. In the following year he won 22 events, producing £33,409 in stakes, this amount placing him second on the list. In 1923 his 19 victories placed him at the top of the list with £44.567. The Aga Khan continued'to reach a high place in each succeeding year, his record from 1929 to 1938 inclusive being 'phenomenal. The smallest amount he gained in prize-money m England in that decade was £18,461, in 1933, but that season the winnings were so well distributed that he was third on the list. In 1932 he won £57,777, and in 1934. when Bahram was a two-year-old, and he also had fine winners in Felicitation, Umidwar, and Theft, his total was £64,957. Last year he was fourth with stakes won at £20.965. this sum bringing his English winnings from 1922 to no less than £551.193 15s.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19390811.2.137.13

Bibliographic details

A BREAK AT LAST, Evening Post, Volume CXXVIII, Issue 36, 11 August 1939

Word Count
527

A BREAK AT LAST Evening Post, Volume CXXVIII, Issue 36, 11 August 1939

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