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NEWS OF THE DAY

locH Name Protected.

"Protection of the name and badge of Toe H under the provisions of the Chartered Associations (Protection of Names and Uniforms) Act, 1930, is notified.in the Gazette. This prevents other persons or organisations from copying or using the name or the badge. Fish With Three Eyes. A deep-water sole with three eyes has been received by the Auckland War Memorial Museum, . states the "New Zealand Herald." It is the only example of a fish with a third eye known by the assistant director and conchologist, Mr. W. B. Powell, who said that all three eyes were fully developed. The specimen was given to the museum by Mr. F. Johnstone. It was caught in the Bay of Plenty by the fishing vessel Coastguard when trawling. Naming of Buffalo Grass. An interesting version of how buffalo grass got its name was given by an Australian visitor during question time after a lecture to the Auckland Botanical Society, states the '"New Zealand Herald." The name, he said, was given because th!e grass first reached Australia in the ballast of the ship Buffalo. It was pointed out that the grass which grows under that name in Australia and New Zealand is not the buffalo grass of the United States. Under the Voluntary System. "The only action we can take against a man who does not turn Out to parades," said Colonel P. H. Bell, Officer Commanding the Southern Military District, in Christchurch on Tuesday, "is to ask for an explanation, and if very good reasons are not given, then we can tell the man that he is not suitable for training, and he will be dropped." Exhibition Staff Headquarters. By tomorrow nearly all staffs officially connected with the Exhibition will be settled there, until its close. Mr. G. Sara, manager of the" Government court, and his staff moved into the court from tie Exhibition Company's administrative block at Rongotai today, and tomorrow the general manager, Mr. C. P. Hainsworth, and his staff, hitherto temporarily housed in Brandon House, will take up the quarters Mr. Sara is vacating today. The representative of the concessionary company controlling Playland, Mr. Henry Seff, has been in occupation of the Playland administrative block kt Rongotai i for some time. i Try Again, Please. j Entertainment free of charge may be had by anyone who cares to take up a stand somewhere near the main entrance to the Government Life Insurance; Building in Customhouse Quay. The doorways have just been completed and two revolving doors are provided. Nine out of every ten people who enter or leave the building begin by pushing the doors the wrong way and finding themselves brought suddenly to a full stop. The reason is that these doors revolve clockwise instead of the more usual anti-clockwise movement. Apparently the aim is to conform to the keep to the left rule of the footpath, but whatever the reason it will obviously be a long time before the public remember that the doors of the new building work "the wrong way." St. John Ambulance in London. A letter has been received by the Wellington Centre of the St. John Ambulance Association from Sir James Elliott, who is at present- in London. Sir James states that, accompanied by Lady Elliott, he visited St. John's Gate, at Clerkenwell, on June 5 and spent the greater part of the afternoon with Sir Percival Wilkinson, Secretary-General to the Chancery of the Order, and Colonel Perowne. Sir James stated that he was very proud to be a member of the Order. The ancient rooms, the books, the histori- j cal flags, and the various coats of arms j were wonderful. A further visit was to be made to view the historical treasures of the Order. Sir James and Lady Elliott have been invited to the installation of the Duke of Gloucester as Grand Prior of the Order in place of the aged Duke of Connaught, and Sir James is also to be a guest at the inspection in Hyde Park by FieldMarshal Chetwode of the St. John Ambulance Brigade competitions.

Press and Power Board. A decision to invite the Press to all of the ordinary meetings of the Hutt Valley Electric Power Board was made by the board at its meeting yesterday. The matter was introduced by Mr. P. Dowse, who first moved that all matters taken in committee should come before the open board for endorsement. The motion was amended to read that both board meetings held in the one month should be public meetings, at which the board would go into committee on individual subjects, if necessary. Previously- the board, which meets on the first and third Thursdays of each month, invited the Press to the latter meeting only.. Motorists Take Bus. "The number of weekly ticketholders has increased, and a lot of people seem to be using the buses in preference to their cars," said Mr. J. C. Gibb, the borough traffic inspector, in his report to last night's meeting of the Eastbourne Borough Council. The report stated that the traffic on the boats was much the same as for June, 1938, but that the buses showed an increase. This was probably due to the state of the Hutt Road. Some of the trips which had increased were the 7.55 a.m. and 8.30 a.m. trips from Eastbourne and the 3.30 p.m. and 4.20 p.m. trips from Wellington. The Wettest Month. No one raised his voice against the motion moved by Mr. H. A. Huggins at the Wellington Diocesan Synod yesterday afternoon asking the standing committee to inquire into the possibility of holding the annual session of Synod at some other period than in the wettest and coldest month of the yeai\ The standing committee is to report to the next annual meeting of Synod. Mr. IJuggins said that the motion was not intended to be ironical. In view of the weather that usually prevailed' when Synod was in session, however, he thought the matter was one which was worthy of i>eing looked into. Mr. C. P. Brown (Wanganui), addressing the president, the Yen. Archdeacon W. Bullock, raised a point of order. "Which is the wettest month in Wellington?" he asked, , amidst laughter. Archdeacon Bullock: "I must have notice of that question, sir." (Renewed laughter.) The motion was passed unanimously. Avenue of Kauris. ~' A proposal to plant an avenue of kauris in Aratonga Avenue as a Centennial memosial was approved at a meeting of the One1 Tree Hill Borough Council on Wednesday, states the? "New Zealand Herald." It would be greatly to the credit of the council to be the first local body to plant kauris in a street, said Mr. W. G. Mulholland, in suggesting that fourteen trees should be planted on each side of the street on Arbor Day this year, August 2. Experts agreed that nursery-grown kauris would do well in the locality. Bush-grown trees had been proved unsuitable for planting in streets and reserves. Mr. Mulholland suggesjld that the planting should be done by representative citizens and head teachers and senior pupils of schools in the district, and that they should subsequently care for the trees. The kauris would not interfere with overhead wires, and in any case by the time they grew high enough all wires would probably be underground. "So will we," remarked the Mayor, Mr. I. J. Goldstine. "It Is Intolerable." "I think it is intolerable that this board should be treated in such a manner by the Government, and that letters should remain unanswered." That was the opinion expressed at Wednesday's meeting of the Auckland-Educa-tion Board, when Mr. F. A. Snell entered a strong protest against the "dilatory policy" of the Minister of Education, the Hon. P. Fraseiyin connection with authority to proceed with ■work on the proposed new school at Hamilton West, states the "Auckland Star." Tenders for the work were accepted by the board two months ago,, but no reply had so far been received from either the Minister or the Department of Education." "Letters should, at least, be answered," said Mr. Snell. "This unbusinesslike attitude is a reflection on their efficiency. We would be satisfied as to the position, one way or the other, if our correspondence was answered." On the suggestion of the board's secretary, Mr. D. W. Dunlop, it was decided that the chairman, Mr. W. J. Campbell, should send a telegram immediately to the Minister asking what was the position in connection with the proposed school. Territorials Put on Weight. The claim of the military authorities that Territorial training improves the physique of the trainees is upheld by effects observed in,39 men of the sth draft, Territorial Force Special Reserve, who recently went into training at the Southern District Military School, Burnham, states the "Press." Without exception,, these 39 men put on weight during the period of their training. Many of the gains noted were considerable—not just a few pounds which might be accounted for as a natural variation. The heaviest gain was 231b, followed by two of 221b; and there were others of 211b, 201b, 18Jib, 181b, 161b, and 10£lb. The smallest increase noted was 21b; but this man made up for lv's slight increase in weight by putting on an inch in height. The carefully kept records of the school show that the 39 men gained 483J1b among them, an average increase in weight of approximately 12&lb. The average increase in height j was half an inch. The men were all regarded as splendid physical specimens when they offered their services, so that the increases are taken as a striking tribute to the value of the training and the excellence of the food at the military school.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19390721.2.59

Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY, Evening Post, Volume CXXVIII, Issue 18, 21 July 1939

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1,619

NEWS OF THE DAY Evening Post, Volume CXXVIII, Issue 18, 21 July 1939

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