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THE GRAND NATIONAL

IRISH HORSE'S WIN

(From "The Representative.)

LONDON, March 27

Although the favourite did not win the Grand National Steeplechase this year, the result was a tremendouslypopular one. Sir Alexander Maguire, a well-known business man in Ireland, had the thrill of leading in the winner, his nine-year-old gelding Workman, who came in third at Aintree last year. Workman won by three lengths from Captain L. Scott Briggs's MacMoffat, with Miss Paget's Kilstar 15 lengths away third. Cooleen was fourth, as she was a year ago.

Of the 37 starters, 11 stood up for the journey of something over four miles. These were Symaethis (fifth), Dominick's Cross (sixth), West Point (seventh), Pencraik (eighth), Royal Mail (ninth), Bachelor Prince (tenth), and Under Bid (eleventh). The last two had a fine finish all to themselves while the crowd were surging round the unsaddling enclosure. The favourite, Kilstar, had never previously seen the thirty National jumps, but he was very favourably handicapped and much reliance was placed upon him, for his winter jumping record had been a good one. He will never again get in with the light impost of 10.3. Next in order of favouritism came Mr. A. Salisbury's Blue Shirt, then Sir E. Hanmer's splendid lepper Teme Willow, then the top weight, Mrs. Camille Evans's Royal Mail, who had an ideal preparation.> Of the Irish horses, Royal Danieli (second last year) and. Workman started at equal price in the betting. WHAT THE SEA GAVE UP. It is related that a bottle was washed ashore on the Irish coast containing tips for the spring double—Squadron Castle and Blue Shirt. That double did not mature. But the "tip" from the sea made Blue Shirt in great request at the meeting.

This is the second time in many years that an Irish owned and trained horse has won the great race. The last winner was Troytown, who was ridden by a Welshman, Jack Anthony.

The conditions were ideal. The afternoon was fine, the going perfect for racing over fences or hurdles, and visibility wonderful. One of the handsomest horses in the parade was Royal Danieli. Workman is a very big horse with tremendous power behind the saddle. He looked as if, should he meet a fence wrong, he would not fall but go right through it. Kilstar could not have looked better, but he is rather too much of a racehorse to be a real Grand National horse. Cooleen looked.fit to run the race of her life. Rockquilla and Brendan's Cottage paraded remarkably well, as did the American-bred War Vessel, who is by Man o' War, the sire of last year's winner, Battleship. A GOOD DISPATCH. At the first attempt they were got away by Captain Allison to a good start, only Cooleen being rather slowly into her stride. Birthgift at once dashed into the front followed by Rockquilla, Perfect Part, Under Bid, and Red Hillman. At the first fence, Drim, War Vessel, Brendan's Cottage, and Mesmerist all fell. Dunhill Castle fell at the third. As they approached Becher's, Birthgift was still making the running, and by this time the field was already well strung out almost in Indian file. „.«.«. * •, At the Canal turn, Birthgift was followed by Sporting Piper. At the fence after Valentine's, Sporting Piper jumped to the front followed by Birthgift. At the last fence before reaching the racecourse, Sporting Piper, came on to a clear lead, followed by Under Bid and Kilstar. Going to the water, Under Bid took up the running from Kilstar, Red Hillman, Dominick's Cross, Sporting Piper, Birthgift, Inversible, Black Hawk, West Point, MacMoffat, Workman, Bachelor Prince, Royal Mail, Lucky Patch, Pencraik, Milano, Cooleen, Deslys, and Second Act. Into the country the second time, Kilstar jumped alongside Under Bid and Red Hillman, these being followed by Workman, West Point, and Dominick's Cross. At the fence after Valentine's, Workman suddenly shot to the front. Three fences from home, Workman was just ahead, and he came on to the racecourse closely followed by MacMoffat, these being clear of Dominick's Cross. Two fences from home, Workman and MacMoffat jumped together, followed by Kilstar and Dominick's Cross. At the last fence Workman and Mac-

Moffat again jumped together, followed by Kilstar. On the flat, however, Workman soon gained the ascendancy. WORKMAN'S OWNER. Sir A. Maguire, with whom were Lady Maguire and their daughters, is a native of Liverpool. He has match factories in Dublin and Belfast, and he lives at Ard Mulchan, Navan, County Meath, though he has a house, too, at Eastbourne. He had previously owned match factories in various parts of the world.

Workman was bred by the late Dr. O'Leary, of Kanturk, County Cork. His sire, Cottage, was by Tracery, and his dam, Cariella, was by Caricato, who was bred in Argentina. He was sold as a two-year-old for 40 guineas. Sir Alexander bought him for 1500 guineas three years ago after he had won a 42----mile race at Punchestown, confident ;even then that he had the jumping lability, the speed, and the staying power to bid strongly one day for the Grand National. He has already won more than £10,000 in prize-money. Sir Alexander was once connected with journalism and ran "The Freeman's Journal" for the late John Redmond in the days of the Home Rule Party. Almost his first thoughts after the race were for the people of Navan. "Every man, woman,.and child in that town," he said, "has backed my horse. It's a great day for them." Tim Hyde, the jockey, has for some years been one of the principal expert riders of show ring jumpers in that country. He rode steeplechasing first as an amateur, and became a professional about two years ago. He is a i member of a well-known sporting family in County Cork. "My only anxious moments," he said, "were when I could not shake off a loose horse for two or three fences before Becher's the second time round. Workman jumped like a stag." The trainer of Workman, John Ruttle, is an ex-cross-country jockey who has ridden at Aintree, but not in the Grand National. When Workman was led into the unsaddling enclosure Ruttle dived a hand into his pocket and produced two boxes of matches. "I carry them for luck," lie remarked. ,

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19390415.2.171.11

Bibliographic details

THE GRAND NATIONAL, Evening Post, Volume CXXVII, Issue 88, 15 April 1939

Word Count
1,044

THE GRAND NATIONAL Evening Post, Volume CXXVII, Issue 88, 15 April 1939

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