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NEWS OF THE DAY

Air-raid Precautions,

The Minister of Internal Affairs (the Hon. W. E. Parry) has circularised local bodies in regard to the steps to be taken to protect citizens from air raids. It is proposed, states the circular, to form classes for instruction in air-raid precautions, especially how to control gas attacks, the instructors to be drawn from various sources, including military authorities, members of the Police Force, the teaching profession, fire brigades, St. John Ambulance, etc. Classes are to be held in the evenings and on certain halfdays to be set aside for the purpose. The Eastbourne Borough Council last evening offered its full co-operation.

Too Close to Aerodrome?

When a letter was received at the meeting of the Upper Hutt Borough Council last eyening from the Wellington Hospital Board asking approval of the latest loan proposal, the Mayor (Mr. P. Robertson) remarked that one point that had not been commented on so far was the proximity of the hospital to the aerodrome. In the event of war the aerodrome would be subject to raids by bombers and the hospital was equally liable to suffer the effects. The council decided to support the loan proposal.

Bees in his "Bach."

A Blenheim resident who owns a small cottage at Waikawa Bay may be said to have bees in his "bach." A thick, dark cloud, resembling smoke, had been seen over the chimney of the building earlier in the week, but it has since transpired that it was a big swarm of bees which had apparently decided to spend the holidays by the seaside, and went down the chimney. A peep through the window of the living-room satisfied an investigator that he was not suffering from an optical illusion, for the room- was "alive" with bees. The owner of the cottage is not running any risks, and when he goes to Waikawa this weekend he will be accompanied by an apiarist, who, he thinks, will be able to reason with the bees and get them to leave in a friendly way.

Condition of Upper Hutt Roads

The works committee had deliberated until about midnight at its last meeting about the condition of roads in the borough, said Councillor J. Blewman at the meeting of the Upper Hutt Borough Council last evening. The streets were now in a worse condition than ever before. The overseer had been busy with other works, but from now on the complaints would receive attention. Councillor H. C. Poison considered that the roads and footpaths were so bad that the money being spent on them was wasted, potholes being especially bad. This was one of the reasons why an engineer should be appointed. The chairman of the works committee (Councillor C. A Rendle) agreed with Councillor Blewman that an improvement should be noticed from now on, especially as the Siiverstream work was being finished.

Mr. Nash Thanked

The Eastbourne Borough Council placed on record last evening its appreciation of the services rendered to the borough by the Hon. W. Nash, M.P.. while he was member for the district (Eastbourne was formerly m the Hutt electorate but is now in Wellington Suburbs). The Mayor (Mr. E W Wise) said Mr. Nash had worked very'hard and had never spared himself when asked to do anything for the progress of the borough. One thing was evident, that the borough could always rely on a prompt reply to all its requests. Councillor M. Magill also paid a tribute to Mr. Nash who as Minister of Finance, with great responsibilities, might have been excused from paying attention to small requests. It was decided to inform Mr. Nash of the borough's appreciation

Eastbourne Telephone Need. Eastbourne residents desire to have further slot telephone facilities, especially at the south end of the borough. Replies were received by the Borough Council last evening from the Hon. W. Nash, and Mr. H. E. Combs, member for the district, regretting that a slot telephone, giving connection with Wellington, could not be given on account of the heavy expenditure necessary to give a line into Wellington. The P and T. Department was willing to consider giving a slot telephone for purely local use. Councillor S. G. Shearer said he could not understand why a Wellington connection could not be given without heavy expenditure. A slot telephone giving a Wellington connection was in use outside the Post Office and all that was asked for was a similar one at the south end. The Mayor (Mr. E. W. Wise) said apparently there was some technical difficulty of which he was not aware. On the motion of Councillor D. Bowie the matter was left in the hands of the Mayor and the Town Clerk (Mr. C. L. Bishop) to interview the Department. New Camping Ground?

A suggestion that a camping ground should be established at Maidstone Park was made by Mr. H. W. Dalton, superintendent of the park, in a letter to last night's meeting of the Upper Hutt Borough Council. He stressed the abundance of shade and shelter, and the usefulness of cold showers, sinks, up-to-date sanitary -conveniences, hot points for boiling water, and swings and other play apparatus for children. He asked that the council should consider his suggestion, as no monetary outlay would be involved except for advertising. All that was required was that the public should be apprised, and that a scale of charges should be fixed for motor-cars and the right to erect tents. Councillor W. Greig said that nothing could be done until the purchase of the park was finalised, and the Mayor (Mr. P. Robertson) commented that a special meeting would have to be called next week. It was decided to refer the matter to the reserves committee to report to the special meeting. ,

Putting on a Show. Wanganui has provided varied fare for residents during the past few days, writes "The Post's" representative. After one of the worst gales in years, that lasted three days, the weather turned bitterly cold, and many tender plants succumbed to a slight frost. Then came five earthquake shocks, the first, at 1.22 p.m. on Wednesday, and the last at 12.20 p.m. on Thursday. Municipal Milk Advocated. A report from the Wanganui City Council's health inspector on the milk question is to be considered at the next meeting of the council, states "The Post's" representative. The inspector advocates that the council should control the milk supply of the city. He points out that the milk supplied to the schools is absolutely satisfactory, and considers that the public generally should have the advantage of the scheme also. Pasteurisation, he says, is absolutely essential to make milk safe. Colin Tapley With Beard! "While I was in Los Angeles I met Colin Tapley, the New Zealand actor, who was wearing a fully-grown beard," said Sir Cyril Ward, who returned to Christchurch on Wednesday, after an •- extensive tour abroad, reports the | "Press."* Mr. Tapley apologised for his i beard, but stated that it was necessary for a new picture in which he was appearing called "If I Were a j King." Sir Cyril remarked that he had visited the Paramount studio, where he had seen Ronald Colman and Frances Dee appearing in shots for this film. Mr. Brian Tapley, a brother of the actor, was also now engaged in the motion picture business in Hollywood. Coincidence Strikes Audience. A murmur of amused surprise passed through a Wellington picture theatre audience last night when reference was made in one of the well-known "March of Time" series of special features to the attitude of American doctors towards Government control or socialisation of medical services. Concluding a public address, the leader of the large majority of the doctors who oppose any form of control said: "The practice of medicine is still a profession. It must never become a business or a trade or be under the control of Government bureaucracy." The aptness of the remark to the present position in New Zealand was obviously noted'by the audience. "Afraid to Speak." Refugee Jews, the subject of Nazi tyranny, travelled across Canada, and from Vancouver to Auckland, at the same time as the Rev. J. Lawson Robinson, of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Christchurch, states the "Press." Having been practically ordered out of Germany, the refugees were very grieved about things, Mr. Robinson said in an interview yesterday, but they could not be persuaded to talk. They described conditions in Germany as terrible, but when pressed for details they would not say anything, as they feared for their relatives remaining in Germany. "They were as decent a group of people as you would find anywhere," said Mr. Robinson. "They u?ere sent out of their country, and they do not know what the future^ holds for them." Unique Position. As president of the Electric Supply Authorities' Association, while not holding office in any supply authority, Mr. C. O. Morse, of Napier, is believed to occupy a position unique in the Dominion. He was first appointed to the presidency when he was Mayor of Napier, but was defeated in the Mayoral election earlier in the year. However, desiring to retain Mr. Morse's services in the electric supply field, the Napier Borough Council appointed him their representative on the Supply Authorities' Association. Mr. Morse is at present in Wellington on electric supply business.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY, Evening Post, Volume CXXVI, Issue 127, 25 November 1938

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1,554

NEWS OF THE DAY Evening Post, Volume CXXVI, Issue 127, 25 November 1938

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