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SHOE INDUSTRY

PASSING REGRETTED

IMPROVING QUALITY

ASSOCIATION'S EFFORTS

A review of the activities o£ the Shoe Eesearch Association was given by the Minister in charge of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research (the Hon. D. G. Sullivan) in a statement made yesterday. The Minister said that the objects of the association were to help the boot? manufacturers to maintain and, where possible, to improve the quaiity of footwear made in New Zealand. By a fulfilment of these objects the association would not only be rendering a service to the individual manufacturers but also to the community as a whole.

Mr. Sullivan said that in Septenv ber of last year the Shoe Manufacturers' Federation had decided to form a Shoe Research Association in conjunction with the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research. The association was linked up with the Leather Research Association, ,wbich had been so successful during (the 10 years of its existence in helping to maintain and improve the quality of the leather made in New Zealand. This co-operation placed the combined research association in a unique position, as it was enabled to carry out its investigations from the point of view of the finished article—the shoe as worn by the wearer. From this angle, each of the two industries was not regarded as a separate unit but rather as a part of a greater concern, the object of which was to satisfy a definite requirement of the general public. . , , . How far the association had progressed during the first year of its activities was discussed at a meeting of the executive commitee on October 4. The director, Mr. P. White, described in his report the work carried out during the year. Briefly, the association's activities fell under the three headings of (a) Research on factory problems; (b) research on general principles of footwear manufacture; (c) educational j work. INCREASING EFFICIENCY. The aim of the research on factory problems had been to help the industry to increase its efficiency by a reduction of waste in time and materials by the improvement of methods of manufacture and by a better utilisation; of the materials available. The research, on general principles underlying footwear construction carried out was of a preliminary nature involving an investigation of factors, affecting wearing values, foot comfort, appearance, and shape during wear. The educational work consisted chiefly of a monthly circular letter describing in as simple language as possible the results of. the investigations carried out and giving information of interest dealing with specific operations or materials. This circular letter afforded a definite point of contact between the research staff and the factory on their periodical visits to the factories. The manufacturing members of the executive committee had expressed their great appreciation of the results obtained by the first year's work. When the association was formed certain members were sceptical as to how it could benefit the trade. The indirect results of the activities of the association were possibly greater than the direct, said Mr. Sullivan. The value of the visits of the research staff could not be directly estimated. The presentation of new aspects and new points of view on old problems gave fresh energy for their solution. The monthly circular letters contained information of great value to managers, foremen, and workpeople, and Haa created an added interest in the work of the factories. The boot and shoe industry had for many years been increasing the quality of its product and the committee was definitely of the opinion that the activities of the Research Association had been a great help to the trade in its efforts satisfactorily to meet the increased and more varied demands of the public.

EX-MEMBERS OF HARBOUR

BOARD

The deaths of Sir Harold Beauchamp and the Hon. A. D. McLeod, former members of the board, Mr. James Findlay, who was well known in shipping circles in Wellington, and also of several members of the board's staff, were referred to with regret by the chairman (Mr. C. M. Turrell) at last night's meeting of the Wellington Harbour Board.

Sir Harold Beauchamp, said Mr. Turrell, was a member of the board representing Wellington City for 13 years, from June, 1895, to February, 1908, during which period he was chairman for three years, from July, 1900. to February, 1903. He was one of the foremost authorities on finance in New Zealand, and over a long period of years was an outstanding figure in the mercantile life of Wellington.

The Hon. A. D. McLeod, said Mr. Turrell, was a member of the board from April, 1919, to April, 1921, as the representative of the Wairarapa combined district.

Resolutions expressing the board's regret at the/deaths of these two former valued members were carried, members standing in silence.

Mr. Turrell said that Mr. Findlay had been New Zealand representative, of the Shaw, Savill, and Albion Co., Ltd., for 25 years. He was an outstanding and greatly respected personality in shipping circles in the Dominion, his graciousness of manner expressed throughout his business life winning for him the high esteem of all with whom he came in contact.

A resolution was passed expressing the board's regret at Mr. Findlay's demise and adding that during his association with,the port and its officers, by his qualifications, character, and gracious manner, he earned the high esteem of all.

Mr. Turrell reported that the deaths had also occurred of three members of the staff—Messrs. J. A. Nicholson (traffic manager's department), F. Renton (mechanics' department), and T. H. Gillings (construction department)—and that letters of condolence had been sent in each case.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19381027.2.156

Bibliographic details

SHOE INDUSTRY PASSING REGRETTED, Evening Post, Volume CXXVI, Issue 102, 27 October 1938

Word Count
927

SHOE INDUSTRY PASSING REGRETTED Evening Post, Volume CXXVI, Issue 102, 27 October 1938

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