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TURF NOTES

OUTSIDER'S DERBY BOIS ROUSSEL WINS FULFILS EARLY PROMISE (From "The Post's" Representative.) LONDON, June 4. So impressed was the Hon. Peter Beatty when Bois Roussel, in his first start, won a race at Longchamp (France) early this year that he decided to ask for a price to be put on him, and when £8000 was mentioned he bought the colt. Bois Roussel was sent across to join the Derby favourite, Pasch in Fred Darling's stable at Beckhampton, but because of the dry weather it was decided not to race him. The Derby was only his second start. Mr. Beatty hoped for rain. His prayer was answered, and Bois Roussel did the rest. After lying well behind—so far back, indeed, that as the field swung into the straight C. E. Elliott, the jockey, did not think he had one chance in a thousand of winning—Bois Roussel began to pass the field one by one. A quarter of a mile from the post, Scottish Union and Pasch were the only horses in front of him. A tap of the whip, and Bois Roussel literally bounded ahead. A furlong from home he took the lead and won by four clear Carslake. the 52-year-old veteran who had been keeping a length or two in reserve with Scottish Union, was amazed. Ruefully he said afterwards that everything had gone smoothly till then for him on Scottish Union. He had tracked the forcing leader Halcyon Gift down the hill and until half-way up the straight. Soon he found himself in front and still capable, he felt, of holding the challenge ° "We C seemed to sort ourselves out," he said. "Surely it must be one of 1 us. But then something in a white jacket and quartered cap dashed by us, and it was good-bye to a lifes ambition." WELL-DEVELOPED COLT. Bois Roussel is a big and well-devel-oped brown colt by Vatout, the sire of William of Valence, out of a very good brood mare in Plucky Liege by Spearmint a winner of the Derby, from ConSrtina, by St. Simon.. Admiral Drake and Sir Galahad 111 are also, out of Plucky Liege, whose half-sister by RSnd, Garron Lass is the dam of Friar's Daughter, the dam of Bahram, a winner of the Derby and one ?f the best winners of that race of all time. It is a little over two months since Mr! Beatty happened to mention to Prince Aly Khan that he wanted to buv a good horse, and said he was nrenared to go to £3000. Prince Aly who had seen Bois Roussel, then the OTOperty of M. Volterra in France, lulgesteTthe purchase of the colt but told Mr. Beatty he would cost £8000. Offers were made to M. Volterra who. however, stuck out for his price, and eventually Mr. Beatty and F red Darling crossed the Channel to see -Bois Roussel race. He won his race, at Schamp, and the deal was immediatMyr. Beatfy's profits from his victory have been estimated to be aDoui £80000 He backed the horsei andwon £35000, he won another £?°OO in stake money, and his horses vaiue went up £35,000. FORTUNE INHERITED. Mr. Beatty is only a young man. He registered his colours » ■* M2^™ t * ?"* season after he came of age. Tharsame vear he inherited from his mother, who was a daughter of Marshal Field, £200,000 and her stables. She also lpft him her Reigate property, The Priory Another £40,000 came to him on the death of his father. His purchase of Bois. Roussel may be taken as indicating that he has also inherited from the late Lord Beattv an eye for a horse. Mr. Beatty dfd not follow in the footsteps of his elde" brother, Lord Beatty, and go into the Navy. Instead he went to Eton. Like Lord Beatty he i? a hunting' man. He regards the air as the belt medium for travel, and he backs his opinion in business. He is a director and one of the principal shareholders in Personal Airways. Lord Beatty, his brother, listened to the broadcast of the race, being still in a nursing home at Melton Mowbray following an accident in the hunting I field on l-ebrua'ry 11. When congratulated on his brother's success, he said: "I am very delighted. It confirms my brother's good judgment when he saw the horse running in France. Mr. Beatty has stated that the next race in which the Derby winner will run is uncertain at the moment. I have entered him," he said, for the Gold Vase at Ascot, but I have no intention of running him there now. He is also in the Grand Prix de Paris, and in a race worth some thousands of pounds to be run at Berlin. He is engaged, too, in the big international race at Ostend."

KACE RUN IN RAIN. Rain was prophesied for "Derby Day, and it began to drizzle as the field went to the starting point. It was some minutes before the starter could get them to line up to his satisfaction. Eventually he got them away to quite a good start, though Bois Roussel hung fire and was last of all to settle down. Licence, the King's horse, was seen to b'e! in front going up the hill'from Halcyon Gift, Pasch, Caerloptic, Manorite, Chatsworth, and Blandstar, Scottish Union at this time being last but two, and just in front of Mirza At the top of the hill, Halcyon Gift went on clear, following by Chatsworth, Pasch, being on the rails in a good position about fourth, with Scottish Union moving up. Halcyon Gift had a lead of about three lengths as they started the descent to Tattenham Corner and was still in front entering the straight, being then closely followed by Scottish Union, Pasch, Portmarnock, Mirza 11, and Golden Sovereign. Halcyon Gift was still in front halfway up the straight, followed by Scottish Union, Pasch, Golden Sovereign, and Cave Man. Scottish Union headed Halcyon Gift rather more than a furlong from home, with Pasch also fighting hard for the lead. Just when it looked as though it might be a close race between Scottish Union and Pasch, Bois Roussel came from the ruck with a tremendous burst of speed. He went past Scottish Union and Pasch as if they were no more than hacks, and, galloping strongly to the end, was a very easy winner by four lengths, with Scottish Union beating Pasch by two lengths for second place, Pound Foolish was fourth, and then came Cave Man, Golden Sovereign, Portmarnock, Unbreakable, Manorite, Halcyon Gift, Slip On, and Troon, with Malabar last. The time for the race, 2min 39 l-ssec, was slow.

DEATH OF FAFNER The Hawera owner-trainer Mr. F. Walker suffered a severe loss this week in the death of the three-year-old Fafner. The first symptoms of an internal complaint were shown only the previous day. Fafner was bred by Mr. J. J. Barry, Inglewood, from whom Mr. Walker leased the son of Siegfried and Rapt. A little over two years ago he entered J. Fryer's stable, where he received his early education, but after several months Mr. Walker decided to train him himself. Fafner became rather a handful in his early two-year-old career, and he was gelded last October. On his resumption of training, negotiations were opened by Mr. Walicer for the purchase of the gelding 'outright, and the deal was completed in January. Since then he has won two races, besides having numerous minor placlngs, his victories being I achieved at Egmont last month and Otaki in his last start.

ST. LEGER STAKES

A SATISFACTORY ENTRY

The entries of now two-year-olds for next season's New Zealand St. Leger Stakes, recently taken by the Wellington Racing Club, are regarded by the stewards as very satisfactory. They number only 34, but nearly all the horses in the list are tested performers on the eve of entering on their three-year-old careers, and they should be sufficient to provide a field approaching double figures next March. Nominations for such races as a St. Leger are usually taken for horses that are yearlings at the time, and this has. been the general practice with the New Zealand St. Leger. However, in recent years the race had not received the response that the Wellington stewards felt that it was entitled to, and so no entries for a 1939 St. Leger were called for'at the usual date last year. Early this year the club decided to run a 1939 St. Leger, and the entries that have been taken this month are therefore of two-year-olds. Many owners were apparently not clear about the position, for a great number of yearlings were entered for what was thought to be a 1940 St. Leger. No 1940 St. Leger has yet been decided upon, but it is probable that it will be held and that entries of rising three-year-olds will be taken next June, as this year. The eventual continuation of this classic depends upon the support given to the race during the next year or two. Among those who have entered horses for next year's St. Leger are most of the more prominent North Island breeders who also race horses. For instance, Mr. G. M. Currie has entered Rehearsal and Homily, Mr. T. !A. Duncan Snigger, Titter, and Ecstatic, Mr. W. H. Gaisford Coronation, Mr. T. H. Lowry Beaupartir, and Mr. F. Ormond Ivar. The South Islander Mr. H. D. Greenwood has engaged Defaulter and Capricious (Night Raid—Egotism). An interesting entry is that crack Heroic colt Te Hero, winner of. this year's Great Northern Trial Stakes. There have been disconcerting reports from the north, some even hinting that j Te Hero might not race again, but apparently his connections. are hopeful that he can be trained again for racing next season. The best of this season's two-year-olds are mostly in the St. Leger- entry, and some three-quarters of . those nominated have already been winners. The South Island is poorly represented outside of Mr. Greenwoods pair. Among other horses in the list are Peerless, Amigo, Surmount, Great Legion, Selkirk, Twenty Grand, and Old Bill, so that there is ample material to provide a race next autumn well up to the standard that is desired for a classic contest. GENERAL INCREASES Entries for future events taken by most clubs in the Dominion during the present month show a substantial increase on last year's figures. This is an excellent augury for the success of the coming season's racing. The Wellington Racing Club received 110 more nominations than last year for its three classics other than the St. Leger Stakes, for which no comparison is possible. The Wellesley Stakes entrj' was 114, compared with 79 last year; the Wellington Stakes entry 172, compared with 125 last year; and the North Island Challenge Stakes entry 169, compared with 141 last year. The total was 455, as against last year's 345. The Canterbury Jockey Club has had a' large increase in the nominations for its classic races, the total for six events being 759, compared with 545 last year. The following are the details, last year's figures being given in parentheses:—Welcome Stakes, 118 (73), Middle Park Plate 72 (52), Champagne Stakes 143 (96), Challenge Stakes 141 (99), Derby 185 (145), Oaks 100 (80). The Auckland Racing Club received 1307 entries for its classic events to be held at future meetings, compared with 1015 last year, an increase of 292. For the Welcome Stakes nominations totalled 95, Great Northern Foal Stakes 154, Royal Stakes 139, Champagne Stakes 175, Guineas 205, Derby 225, Oaks 131, and St. Leger 183. For future events to be staged by the Avondale Jockey Club entries aggregated 309, against 269 a year ago, an increase of 40. There were 51 nominated for the Champion and Nihotapu Plates, 75 for the Avondale Stakes, and 132 for the Guineas.

For its four fixed-weight races next season, the Takapuna Jockey Club received 239 entries, or 114 fewer than twelve months ago. Sixty-one were entered for the Takapuna and Wynyard Plates, 54 for the Pupuke Plate, and 63 for the Hauraki Plate.

FLASHLIGHT'S PROGRESS The cut on the near hind leg that Flashlight suffered on the first day of the South Canterbury Meeting is mending well,,but it will probably take the best part of another fortnight before it is properly healed. Flashlight was nominated for the Dromore Hack Steeplechase at? Ashburton, but he has not met the acceptance. All being well, however, ne will race at Trentham, where he figures in the Wellington Steeplechase but may prefer the hack events. T. H. Gillett has not allowed him to remain idle during the enforced absence from the track, and it should not take much fast work to bring him to racing pitch again. MARTON ENTRIES The following fire the nominations for the Marton Jockey Club's Winter Meeting, to be held on July 2:— Maiden Plate, £100; 6 furlongs.—St. Cedric, Lady Whetu, Cuddler, Miss Waitarere, Sir Don, Regicide, Resinguard, Selkirk, Quexona, Waterproof, Merry Thought, Taitoa, Segra, Fine Gold, Hasty Maid, Strolling, Prinihia, Charmante, High Peer, Informer, Sir Rabbi. Hack Hurdles, £135; 1J miles—King Mestor, Black Man, Even Money Autumn Leaf, Requested, Sinking Fund, Colenso, Agog, Lustral, Tail Light, Miss Louvain, Lapel, Entheos, Ruenzori, Otaki. Hack Flying Handicap, £120; 6 furlongs.—Gold Glare, Colincamps, Sporting Gift, All Blood, Flying Acre, Philemup, Waterproof, Marjory Daw, Lady Hoariri, Barley Almond, Golden Ridge, Gold Band, Cuisinier, Rustem, Ruenzori, High Peer, Tidewaiter, Prince Mulla. ( Winter Stakes, £150; 7 furlongsDonegal, Red Sand, Winsome Lu, First Chapter, Te Hai, Master Cyklpn, Matoru, Manawatu, Play On, Passion Fruit, Erebus, Joe Louis, Dorado, Pukeko. Hack and Hunters' Steeplechase, £135; about 2* miles.-King, Mestor, Monteloo, Even Money, Lady Callaghan, Artful Dodger, Croyden, Burghley, Night Hero, Requested, Acron, Blue Steel, Hanover, Miss Louvain, Mozeltove, Royal Romance, Airshot. Crofton Hack Cup, £150; li miles.— Puroto, Donegal, Chat, Royal Record, Mitigation, Iddo, Sky Full, War Lap, Warehi, Revival, Brigadore, Princess Isobel, Golden Enterprise. Farewell Hack Handicap, £120; 5 furlongs.—Lady Whetu, Colincamps, Sporting Gift, Miss Waitarere, Min Lu, Sen Acre, Wilful Lady, Paul Robeson, Shining Hours, Lady Hoariri, Stargono, Colleen Gain, Sir Rabbi. Pelmet, a smart winner as a two-year-old, when she won the McLean Stakes at Dunedin and the Wellesley Stakes at Trentham, is to be retired to the stud. Through meeting with more than her fair share of bad luck in her preparations, her race form has not been of the best. On her day, however, she proved her ability to win in the best company.

APPEAL ALLOWED C. C. GOULSBRO' SUCCESSFUL The New Zealand Racing Conference has allowed the appeal of the jockey C. G. Goulsbro' against his disqualification for six months under rule 282 of tha Rules of Racing. Goulsbro' was disqualified by the judicial committee of the Wanganui Jockey Club on the grounds that he did not ride the horse Catalogue on its merits in the Connolly Handicap run on May 12, 1938. His appeal to the Racing Conference followed an unsuccessful appeal to the Wanganui District Committee. Giving their decision the judges, Messrs. H. F. O'Leary, J. W. Card, and H. Chalmers, state:— . "On the hearing of this appeal we have had before us the reports of the proceedings before the judicial committee of the Wanganui Jockey Club and of the Wanganui District Committee, and we have heard further evidence tendered by the appellant and by the stipendiary steward. After fully considering the reports and evidence we have arrived at the conclusion that the appeal should be allowed. "We realise the seriousness of interfering with the findings of judges of first instance on a question of fact, but we are impelled in this case to take the view that, on all we have heard, there is sufficient to raise a reasonable doubt as to the correctness of the conclusion arrived at by the judicial committee. ■ • ■ "We particularly stress that we have no evidence before us that the judicial stewards acted on their own observations, but on the contrary we have it that one of them, who appeared before the district committee, made it plain that he himself saw nothing to lead to the conclusion that the horse was not run on its merits. "While we have arrived at our decision on- the case placed before us, it is not unimportant to state that .the district committee, which comprised very experienced racing men, some of whom closely observed the race, were equally divided on the question of allowing the appeal-the appeal being disallowed on a casting vote of tne chairman. ... ■ "The further evidence which we heard did not materially advance the case for or against Goulsbro. and, while we cannot escape the conclusion that he rode an injudicious race, we cannot see that it was proved beyond reasonable doubt that he did not nde the horse on its merits. The appeal is, therefore, allowed." TURF NEWS IN BRIEF At Dannevirke J. McCauley will ride Laggard and D. Gordon Monteloo in the hurdles. •m i „v.t The two-year-olds Morning ' Flight and Selkirk promise to. beloo speedy for the older horses m the maiden race at Dannevirke on Saturday. The Cape Horn gelding Maritime, who has already twice won on the flat since his sale to Victoria, was second of a field of fourteen in the Northbrook Maiden Hurdles at Ascot (Melbourne) last week. The New Zealand-bred SiegfriedPolonaise gelding Maestro, who was sold as a yearling to Australia, won the principal event on each day of the Tasmania Racing Club's Winter Meeting a fortnight ago. Journeys End, formerly owned by J. McLaughlin, was third in a highweight. T „„i,„,, At a meeting of the Oamaru Jockey Club committee, an objection tp the club's application for January 3 for its New Year Meeting was received from the Southland Racing Club. Strong criticism of the Southland Club s action was made by the committee, and it was decided to forward a telegram to the Racing Conference strongly protesting against the reappearance for the seventh time in succession of Southland's protest regarding the New Year date. ..

INNESS LAD WELL j EL MEYNELL'S PROSPECTS (Special from "Early Bird.") AUCKLAND, June 22. The Bay of Plenty Racing Club achieved a record on Saturday in its disposal of the nine races on its programme, for, despite a division event, the last race was run right on time. This with the old manual totahsator and win-and-place betting indicates that efficient management can ensure keeping up to time even under these conditions. The dual success of Inness Lad at Tauranga draws attention to his chances at Te Rapa, where he is again engaged in the main steeplechase and hurdles events. As this jumper played with a useful field in the hurdles on Saturday his prospects look second to none in whichever event he contests. He is very well at present. The recent efforts of Inness Lad confirm the merit of Full of Scotch's performances at headquarters, for the latter defeated the Tauranga winner twice over fences, the second time carrying 11.2 and conceding him 91b. Big things were expected of Superior Guard after his dual win at Avondale a couple of months ago, but his most recent efforts have not been in keeping with that form. He was up against strong opposition at the Great Northern Meeting, but back to his own class, and on a roomier track, he may be a better proposition in his division of the hack sprint at Te Rapa on Saturday. He looked particularly well at Ellerslie. . ~ . . u * — . When Aramis made his debut as a ■chaser at the Waikato Meeting last month he was awkward at his fences and very slow at negotiating them. He profited by this experience, however, and went a couple of fair races at Ellerslie, with the result ■that ne is expected to make a much bolder showing if produced in the . minor steeplechase at Te Rapa. He is nicely placed and the opposition is far fT °M Hunting Blood only just hung on for victory in the. six furlongs event at Tauranga, carrying 8.4, he does not appear to be a particularly good proposition in the open seven furlongs at Te Rapa on Saturday, when he will have to carry 8.8. However, he will have the advantage of racing on his h °A hafikthat may be expected to show uo at Te Rapa Is El Meynell, .who ra P ced in Sydney under J. T. Jamieson before being placed in R. S. Bagoy s care at Ellfrslie. . He was right up wltn the division in a hack event on the middle day of the Great Northern Meeting and can be expected to improve with the outing. H« 1S ownldby Mr. W. S. Glenn of Wanganui, and is a three-year-old colt by Hunting Song from Haligan, thus a brother to tne well-performed View H Tw°o o *horses that showed a returnrto form at Tauranga were Gold Vaals and Sly Rebel"the former winning the chief handicap. He claims a dual engagement at Te Rapa, over ten and seven furlongs respectively andl the latter distance may suit him the oeuer. Gay Rebel finished fourth in the OpoUki Handicap, but as he was not ghted a until P the closing: stages;of tte event there was some merit in bis run.

The Riccarton trainer D. O'Connor has had the two-year-old colt Raeburn in strong work for some time and he may be another candidate for Melbourne, engagements haying been made for him in the Toorak and Cantala Handicaps, two important mile events. He showed speed this season, and he may develop into a good threeyeAccording to a southern report, Defaulter is wintering in great style and will be in the best condition to begin a preparation for his, classic engagements. He was in the Wanganui | Guineas, but will probably Btart off in 'the Avondale Guineas. If all goes | well, he may be taken to Australia in the autumn.

THE PALMIST WINS RACING AT KENSINGTON United Press Association—By Electric Telegraph—Copyright. SYDNEY, June 22. At the Kensington Racing Club's Meeting the results included:— THREE- AND FOUR-YEAR-OLD . HANDICAP, £100; 1 mile. i J. E. Pike's b g The Palmist, by . Chief Ruler—Timid, 4yrs, 7.9 (L. Fell) 1 Brio, 7,2 (Killorn) 2 Rebel Chief, 7.8 (Sumner) ....... 3 Seven started. One length and a quarter; length. Time, lmin 41$ sec A race record. PROGRESSIVE HANDICAP, £100; If miles. H. Franks's and J. Walsh's b g Edible, by Limond—Aspic, 4yrs, 9.5 (Bartle) 1 Heraway. 7.10 (W. Cook) 2 Tony, 7.5 (Brown) i Nine started. Head; half a head, Time, 2min lOisec. I NURSERY NOVICE HANDICAP, £100; 5i furlongs. (First division.) B. W. Skelton's ch t Litigation, by ■ | Iliad—Gobble, 2yrs, 8.4 (Hughes). I Pen Name, 7.10 (Stanton) J. a Lady Curie, 9.0 (Watterson) ,v.... 3 Fifteen started. Half a length; two lengths. Time, lmin Bsec, a race record. . . Irish Morn won the Kensington Handicap from Verlina and Televise and set a race record of lmin 41isec for the mile. NORTH CAPE IN FORM United Press Association—By Electric Tel«« graph—Copyright. MELBOURNE, June 22. At the Moonee Valley Race Meeting the following was the result of the . TRIAL HURDLES,' £150; 2 miles and 1 furlong. W. R. Kemball's b g North Cape, by Cape Horn—Lilock, syrs, 9.9 (Glennon) J Frisco, 9.7 (McMahon) 2 Royal Mail, 9,7 (Watts) 3 Six started. One length and a half; six lengths. Time, 4min sisec. \ Gold Rod and the two-year-old The Squire, by Beau Pere from Helen, have completed their holidays and have rejoined G. Price's Randwick team. On appearance, both horses have benefited by their rest from racing. Gold Rod looks particularly; well. , ' —a

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TURF NOTES, Evening Post, Volume CXXV, Issue 146, 23 June 1938

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TURF NOTES Evening Post, Volume CXXV, Issue 146, 23 June 1938

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