Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

DERBY FAVOURITE

HOW HE SPENDS HIS DAY

(From "The Post'i" R«pr«»entatlve.) LONDON, May 12.

Pasch may be the Derby favourite to the rest of the world, but his home town is not backing him. "He's too much talked of," say the butcher, the baker, the plumber, and the oldest inhabitant. "We know a thing or two about horses," said Willie Bell, the plumber, "4nd there's beetv too much fuss over this one to win- anytlting. The locals says,. mysteriously, that Joe Lawson has something up his sleeve at the Man ton staples a few miles away. Just what it 13 cannot be founil out, but the chauffeur, George Harrison, says in a confidential way: "They stopped the workmen dredging a ditch near the stables the other dayMr. Lawson said he had t<) have dead qaiet for one of his special horses." Thfc townsfolk may be sceptical about Pasch, but one man is confident — Fred Darling. He has given him the box that Coronach and Manha (Derby winners) had at his Beckhampton stables when they were being trained. No horse gets that box unless it deserves it. "I'm not boasting; , he's grand," was how he summed up the colt's chances for the big race. These stables, just before the Derby, are more like the wing of a hospital. Stable-boys tip-toe around so that the resting favourite is not disturbed. Pasch puts ' his feet up eighteen hours a day, sleeping for about twelve of them. lie is groomed for two hours, and takes two hours' exercise on the downs. ' w . The beautiful, pampered colt is called at 6.30 a.m. with a bucket of fresh water, oats, and grass. _ Then he goes out for ■ a trot. Back in the stable he is groomed, bedded, and not disturbed until 1 o'clock. Then a stable boy tip-toe* .in, puts the bed straight,. and throws a couple of blankets over him. , , At 4.30 p.m. h£ has his tail combed, his legs examined, and his feet cleaned. He is fed again at 0.45 p.m. Then his coat is groomed before the lights gre turned out.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19380601.2.170.3

Bibliographic details

DERBY FAVOURITE, Evening Post, Volume CXXV, Issue 127, 1 June 1938

Word Count
348

DERBY FAVOURITE Evening Post, Volume CXXV, Issue 127, 1 June 1938

Working