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FOREST FIRE

TIMBER SALVAGE

BIG OPERATION PROPOSED

Proposals for the salvaging of timber affected by the recent big bush fire in the Waimarino-Tokaanu district are contemplated by the Commissioner of State' Forests (the Hon. F. Langstone), and to that end a conference of timber millers and forest service officers is to be called within a few weeks to discuss the large-scale working of the devastated area. Bush was destroyed over about two thousand acres, and it is estimated that over forty million feet of standing timber was affected. Much of it, of course, will not be completely destroyed. The State Forest Service is interested in about half the timber involved.

"This was one of the worst , bush disasters we have had for some time," stated the Minister in an interview, "and now the task is to save as much as possible of the timber. It means getting the co-operation of millers who are working other areas, so that if possible they can transfer their log haulers and their bushmen to the fireswept area. If a scheme can be evolved,' and it can be proved to be an economic proposition, work will cease on bush now being cut in other parts of the district, and resources pooled to get the timber out from the fire area promptly.

"Organisation ywill be necessary in the bush to bring the logs to a central point for transport to existing mills, and it is possible that arrangemer/s will have to be made regarding maintenance of, the-main road for this exceptional traffic, while the Railway Department may also have to cooperate in the distribution of the timber. Another aspect for consideration is that t'fis big work, will result in the production of more logs than can be absorbed by the normal demand for sawn timber, in which case measures may have to be taken to finance the holding of stocks for a time.

"The proposal has its difficulties, and one is the rough nature of some of the devastated areas, which is typical forest cour>y with deep ravines. However, in the national interest, a big salvage- operation is worth considering, and this will soon be done."

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FOREST FIRE Evening Post, Volume CXXV, Issue 1, 3 January 1938

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