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NO CHAMPAGNE!

MRS. MILLER PREFERS TEA

\ (From "The Post's" Representative.) ■-■-.. LONDON, June 5.

After leading in the Derby winner at Epsom on Wednesday, Mrs. G. B. Miller, in whose colours Mid-day Sun runs1, was presented to the King, the Queen, and Queen Mary, all of whom congratulated her on her .victory. "It was marvellous to be the first woman to win the Derby," she said. "This is the moment of my life." Mrs. Miller said she had hoped tier hcrse would win, : but'the- victory, obviously" took her by surprise. She led him into a chorus; of cheers, but was so unnerved by the ordeal that friends had to propel-her into the unsaddling enclosure. V/nen the official came down from the Royal box to tell her that their Majesties wished to congratulate her, Mrs. Miller could not at first be found. . With her mother she had escaped to a distant corner of the enclosure. After the race Mrs. Miller motored j ■with her husband and her mother to her home, Brentry, near Romsey, in Hampshire. There 'were no guests for dinner, and Mrs. Miller went early, to bed. . ,-,..-...-; Mrs.- Miller is twenty-eight and has one son'aged eighteen months. She was formerly Miss LetticeMary Talbot, daughter of the late Major John A Talbot, of the Gloucestershire Hussars. In 1930, i under the will of her 'uncle, -the late Lieutenant-Colonel- W. B. Brocklehurst, head of the sillcmaniifacturing firm of J. P:- Brocklehurst, of' Macclesfield, she inherited a fortune of £500,000. By-the terms of the'will she would have forfeited this legacy if the trustees had not approved her marriage in 1934" to Mr...George B. Miller, of Kingscote Park, .near..Tctr bury, Gloucester. Mr. Miller was formerly a subaltern in the Grenadier Guards.- i: ' ■■ ;> •. f -Racing, is: but. one.,of iseve'ral-.of■ Mrs: •Millers-hobbies. ..She is an enthusiastic golfer arid tennis player, and does riot very-often attend race meetings. Seldom have racing people known so little of the owner of a Derby winner. . . . . ... "I backed my colt, but I'm not going to say for how much," Mrs. Miller, said after the race. "I did not tip him to anybody. I never do. I'd hate-to have it on my conscience if the horse lost. Celebrate? Doc 3 one celebrate? We are just having dinner quietly, in the ordinary way, my mother, my husband, and myself. My greatest thrill was to be presented to the King-and Queen. I-had met them once before when I was presented at Court." Mrs. Miller was asked by a friend after the race: "What about a bottle of champagne?" She replied: "No, I'd much rather have a cup of tea.'

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19370623.2.173.1

Bibliographic details

NO CHAMPAGNE!, Evening Post, Volume CXXIII, Issue 147, 23 June 1937

Word Count
435

NO CHAMPAGNE! Evening Post, Volume CXXIII, Issue 147, 23 June 1937

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