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"CERTAINTY" FAILS

ONE THOUSAND GUINEAS

(From "The Post's" Representative.) LONDON, May 1.

When Gainsborough Lass won the Column Stakes over one mile at the Newmarket Craven Meeting on April 14, with 9st 51b in the saddle, some writers anticipated that she would win the One Thousand Guineas—run at Newmarket yesterday—and then that she might go on to Epsom and repeat Turf history by winning the Derby and the Oaks, just as Signorinetta had done. But yesterday she did not' win the One Thousand—s>e came in only third.

A bay daughter of Gainsborough (1915), she is from Orwell's dam Golden Hair (1920), a Golden Sun mare of No. 10 Bruce Lowe family) She was bredi at the Gilltown Stud by Lord Furness. Now she is hardly likely to be referred to again as a Derby winner, and already doubts are expressed that she will win the Oaks either. ■ . '

The field for the One Thousand was made up of 20 runners, and Gainsborough Lass was regarded as a good thing. But SJr Victor Sassoon's Exhibitionnist (Solario—Lady Wembley), trained by J. Lawson at Manton and ridden by Steve Donoghue, who is riding this season at the top of his form, came in first, 1£ lengths from Major Harold Cayzer's Spray (Blandford—Tilla), with the odds-on favourite a head away third. Exhibitionnlst gave a delightfully smooth performance, making practically all the running. This was Steve's first winner of this particular classic. Close and exciting as the race was, the Newmarket crowd was much disappointed at the failure of the, alleged certainty, Gainsborough Lass. No horse recently has carried greater confidence. On her performance—and her trainer. J. Jarvis, is in agreementshe failed to stay: There is no doubting the pluck of .the filly, for it, was her courage that kept her in the argu-i ment right up to the last stride. The great show that Midday Sun had made in the Two Thousand Guineas spoke eloquently, for Exhibitionnist, who was trying to give, Fred Butters's charge1 61b and ran him to three-parts of a length in the Free Handicap. '

After Le Ksar's unexpected success in' the Two Thousand, some respect was paid to M. Simon Guthmann's Colette Baudoche in the One Thousand. She had been referred to as a "mean-looking sort of a horse and by no means an advertisement to her sire, Biribi." Yet she had the home reputation of "catching pigeons and beating express trains." The racing season in France starts a few weeks before ours, and their horses are ready sooner. Another point was that her owner had sprung a surprise with Taj Mah in 1929, and she was also small and unprepossessing. He might do the same again. The trainer reported that the filly had not wintered too well. She had a, good many friends, but they all fared badly. >

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19370520.2.165.5

Bibliographic details

"CERTAINTY" FAILS, Evening Post, Volume CXXIII, Issue 118, 20 May 1937

Word Count
468

"CERTAINTY" FAILS Evening Post, Volume CXXIII, Issue 118, 20 May 1937

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