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VICTORIA COLLEGE

DEGREES CONFERRED

PROFESSOR YON ZEDLiTZ

LOOKS BACK

HIGHER EDUCATION

■ The annual graduation, .ceremony>;bf. Universit^"; Cciilege :s;^aEfO; he'id' 'in the Town/ttall:-aast.,.evening, in-th'e ; presence of a large attendance^ the 'public. The' chairman of the" College V Council (Mr. P. iievi) presided, and" the • degrees .^vere . cdnferretl by, .Professor ,T. A. jjuiiter', Vice^SHancelior of the of; New! Zealand:. The ad- '■ dress \sj?ygiyeri! byjProfe'ssor G. W. yon ■ ZedHtz^orttfer'-professor of the college. ;'. -V ,^-\->^ ! Mr.-L'eyi referred-ta. the progress the < college A^as-■making,.--and'said it was notewor'tti^xtKat..tlu%year there was a ■record numbefibf students—o26. The previous highest roll was 840 in 1930. ;The erection of biological and administration blocks, to be undertaken short" ly, would further extend the college's 'activities. ' " ... ■■ ,- Professor vo&'Zedlitz said that it was '25 years since he had,-addressed students at a graduation-ceremony, and ■he thought the- occasion was one that : night in which he could look back and "see the distance Victoria College had in that time. This year it i was fitting that such a survey might ■be made by reaspn of the fact that important oversea •• Visitors' were" to come to New Zealand for . education conferences, the Council . for Educa•tional Research was working!, arid the Government was calling -for a general review of the education situation; ,-already important changes had been ■ made, and more were promised. It was ;a fitting' time to look back and see ■ what difficulties the college had had to '^■encounter;--to'-observe -to-what -extent-the--atmosphere-had changed,-and to what extent it might change in the nesfif-'future.?*1 •'-'-■--■*-■■■> ■..:_'. ...1... What was needed in New Zealand, v.-hich was in a position.vdifferent from that of other countries, wasijitsysterfrbf: liigher ; education which wjas thought out for; the jbountry's special; needs; 'a system which was adapted 'jto the'prer cisc requirements of the country and one which was not necessarily modelled., 0n.,., any, ,P.|her , system.,. .The. special requirements of ftie country ■were ...thought ,pf ..when, the university, was founded, but the form in which those- requirements ■■'presented themselves iiye're very "different-;from those1 of the ;pi?eSent day.; Therfe had been the pro'yintjial jealousies i?& the four' province?, arid itj&uld tje^taken that t^e founders never thought that their own sons would go to the university. The founders of the University of New Zealandpwere men that tSeir o\vn sorys? woj^ld go to one of the English 'tuniversities; they thought .that whatSwas'Srequired Was comething suitable ftft^fcKe lower order. The difficulties created by a foundation under fthosej-auspiceS; weht further tlian ' that. %^,s % Q y. "'DOMINION'S NEEDS. If a group of statesmen were to reflect on what New Zealand required, he thought thatHhey would adopt v a system which would hot lead'to k system of emigration. The system adopted had led to a very large emigration of the. ablest graduates'of the university. ;-' The second point would refer to university teaching, and^tjiwouMQjei such that the nature' of the agreements, the tenure, and conditions of the teaching positions in the University of New Zealand should be of such a kind as to attract men who might otherwise"]je prevented from coming Tftal f jnatt«r was not only a question of salaryActually, people who had '' -private means, and were therefore fndifferent to salary, would be. attracted by, conditions which would give them, freedom in research, and m r method of teaching, and, in. particulsf, by t te nonpermanent nature, of tne position. It seemed to him;that^in this" 'country there should ,b<i "grta^ elastjcity' in- ap-

pointments. Men that New Zealand wanted to stay did not waqt to remain here. New Zealand was not the place, for a man who was :a book-worm and lover of libraries to spend his life.

The third point to be taken into consideration was that, the scientific and : vocational (interests of the people, should be given special recognition' in the university. Even now, agricultural training was the Cinderella of the university. Another consideration ■ would be to provide a'type of degree for residents who were not specially interested jn agricultural or pastoral pursuits, and lin -this connection the speaker instanced the-law degree of Germany and France. "This was taken as a basis of a legal course of study, but was of an allround character and embra.ced what one.might term citizenship.

Further, the speaker pointed out that one could not achieve, a; desired result, in things of the spirit by pursuing purely matters of one kind. It was the old story of not-being able to find one's life by seeking it; or if ■ one aimed high, the material things would -be added, but if one aimed low, one would not get even that. . Professor von.Zedlitz said he thought it was quite fair to say that the people of New Zealand had never' conceived of themselves .as .having, any. special responsibility of. doing anything for the world at large. One could riot have a decent: university: on purely material standards. That materialism was the product of'gerontocracy. But •he" had seen young men and women unspoilt by the prevailing influence, and as long as. that, continued, there was hope for the future of the university. ■■'''■ ' : ■ •' ■' The songs "Gaudeamus," "Absent Friends," and the college song were sung by the students.. ■ ■ ■:■■.■■■.. LIST OF GRADUATES. Degrees were conferred as follows:— MASTERS OF AHTS WITH HONOURS. Austin Graham Bagnall, first class in philosophy; Harold Leonard Baker, first class in French; Iris Evelyn Dickens, second class In English and French; Margaret CtceJy Hefford, second class In English and French; Ivan James Hills, second class in French; Letltia Myra KlnK,.second class. In.. Latin; Walter Wynjij .-Mason.'?1 Second; .class.?- iniv'.Engllsh and French!^ Eric 'ildersoni-Mlssen, second class^in history': Willla.mVSterf'art Mitchell, < first-Mass iis Latin and Trench;'-Matthew Henry Oram, second class. in ..mathematics ; Mary Josephine Stock, second class in history. In. Absentia. Cllfrord Avery "Griffiths",'first class in French; Sybil Mary Williams," second class in Latin and French;.,. .V ■/ [ ■■:-\ /"' f \:fMASTERS:OF ARTS. 'John Victor .iu'whakahewa Baker, mathematics; Percir&le Mary Patricia Edwards, Latin and'French.;-William Penrose Boilings, econo; mlcs; :.'Mavis> Jannette Ross, education; Albert; Henry' Ecbtney, history. ' ' In Absentia. - John Saynor Hatherty, Trench; Basil George Jackson, education. ' ■<.';■•*.:. ..: BACHELORS OF ARTS. Leslie Kiven Ashton, Claude" Eigar Brunsden. Nancy Maud Manfleld Bullen, Richard •Bertrand vßurke- (from Canterbury University College), Harry "Manson Campbell; Olive May Castle. :.Edna Alice Coles, Willis;, Ide \ Combs, RutlivMary Cromble, Thomas Edmund Douds, Robert John Heugh Drummond (from Canterbury University College). Florance Joya;Wynne Durikley, Jean Charlotte Evans, Desmond Joseph Finnlgan, Helen Martin Fletcher. David Edward Good, Kathleen Montagu Hancock (nee Hlckey). Marryat Telford Hornsby. Laura Evangctine Irwln, YUe.(,Leonard Jackson. David Ross Jenkins. Patrii-k John Kane, Geraldlne Mary Kean. NorS" Mnrcla McLaren, Margaret Betty Macpherson; Flora Malcolm,' Dulcle Frances«Tepper (fromOCanterbury. .UniversUy College):,, Clive Lochie; Pleasants.^Susie Maj Sanders^ George William Shaw, Kathleen Isabel Slater, 'Betty Frances Turner, Petet Charles Ralph Wells, Balfour Douglas Zohi£b. !;; l|, Abse'litia. .':.: KWi-Mary Kitchener/Lorna Chfttlette May McPheo. Cornelius O'Connor. MASTERS OF SCIENCE WITH HONOURS. ■David''Cairns,-'second-class In zoology; John Fletcher' Gabites, first;class in physics ;. Jack William Hutchings, second class in mathematics; Robert Julian Lancaster, second class in chemistry! Nell George Robertson, first class In mathematics (from University of Otago); George Searle, first. class In physics. 1 '< "4 :! "- ;. iln;>Wenlla. i Amy; Shirley,T)onne, -second class in zoology; Maxwell Gage, first class, in geology. MASTERS OF SCIENCE. ~ Edwin-Sloan . -Borthwick (1934 examination, jfronr.-Canterbury.),h.rch«mlstey;;tf-Jphn , Douglas ■McFaiiane,:iirath>maticsj'..'- s .SlaSwell ..''Barret. H«nH«'i^■ppß^lst^y■;:■'■•^FrI'ederl^^^WiU^«P'•.■.?,*?t??> [tkeniftilyyi'.^.ii'S'-'^:'_■:'■/ ..'v;: ; . '.T'li'.^ .,:>■■;/ 'W' \ 'Nofei.'John :Bythell, 'Logan-'Boyce'carey, MpSr tyh Robert-'Coun^O'oriald Riissell -Currle, Robert J J esliß^Carriham,-.-Jl6bert Leslie .(Goldfinch, lan BonaibV Go\f, £olln. Galloway Green, Alec Wllsoti' Riijdplls; Mirgiiret Broughton ;Selfert (nee Richer); "JamSsv'flruce--Craiß Taylor, Colin .Wilklh'sOß Treme'wan, • Edwin:. Percy T\ liite*

In Abuntlt. Herbert s WallMa Carter, Murjorle Craig

Gibbons, Basil Arthur Kingan (1929 examination), Alfred John Thomas. MASTERS OF LAWS. .• , In Absentia. Bruce Sinclnlr-Lockhnr't, in international, law and conflict of laws, contract and tprts, company law. BACHELORS OF LAWS. Anthony Francis .Thomas Chorlton,! Alonzo Augustus Craig, Harold George Duncan;-Ken-nedy Aston Cough, Alan Gilbert Horsley, Donald Gordon JIcGIII, Alexander John Stewart, i 'Paul-Nestor IVersehaffcH. ■ . ! : In Absentia. Arthur Thomas Scott .McGhlo, John Adam Wilson. MASTERS OF COMMERCE WITH HONOURS. Frank Linjrard, second class in economics and company law. . MASTERS OF COMMERCE. In Absentia. . William Arthur Bryden, In economics and company law. BACHELORS OF COMMERCE. William John Amis, Eric Mncdonald Arnold 'from Canterbury University College), Alan William Laird Baker, Edward Blacker, Geoffrey Charles • Broad. Francis Joseph bavey, Lawrence Oswald' ' Desbbrough, Victor Henry Dv Chateau., William Leslie Edwards, John Alfred Evans, Claude Klrkwell Erilie. John Fleming, Donald Gordon, Hilton Rex Hall, John Douglas Lang, lan Gordon Lythgoe, John Murphy, Charles Stephen riank, liussell Herman Scott. Jimcs Francis Taslicr, Walter John Wainwright. .' :,... In Absentia. Alan Roy Dellow. Donald Edward Harper, liriwlatt Jlath'eson Rogers. BACHELOR OF HOME SCIENCE. Grace Elizabeth Heays (from the University, of iOtagoJ., .. ■■ ■ .. DIPLOMAS IN EDUCATION. Alfred James Blrtles, Donald Murray Frascr (1935 examination), from Otago. DIPLOMAS IN BANKING. ■ (Members of Bank Officers' Guild.). George Edward Joseph S. Hassal Fry Edward Gilbert, Hilton Rex Hall.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19370508.2.130

Bibliographic details

VICTORIA COLLEGE, Evening Post, Volume CXXIII, Issue 108, 8 May 1937

Word Count
1,448

VICTORIA COLLEGE Evening Post, Volume CXXIII, Issue 108, 8 May 1937

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