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THE KENTUCKY DERBY

BOLD VENTURE WAS LUCKY

I Bold Venture, winner of this year's Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs on May 2, was generally conceded to be a lucky victor over the favourite Brevity, who was badly away and failed only by a head to catch the winner, who had been in front all the way. The race is run over li miles, a quarter-mile short of the usual classic distance, and the value of this year's stake was 43,150 dollars (approximately £10,000), with the winner receiving .37,125 dollars. There were fourteen starters, but the first two horses finished well clear of the third, Indian Broom.

Bold Venture, who is owned by Mr. Milton M. Schwartz, is a son of St. Germans, a Swynford stallion who was bred by Lord Astor. It was reported at the. time of the sale of St. Germans that the late Mr. Payne Whitney paid £25.000 for him. In his second season in America he sired that great horse Twenty Grand, winner of the Kentucky Derby in 1931. After Mr. Whitney's death St. GerMans went to his brother, and upon the latter's death he became the property of his son, Mr. C. V. Whitney, who last September presented him to Mrs. Payne Whitney, and he is once again at Greentree Farm, Lexington. This year's Derby winner, who was a very ordinary two-year-old, winning only three small races in eight starts, was bred by Mr. Schwartz, whose brother Charles won the Liverpool Grand National Steeplechase with Jack Horner ten years ago. Last season he raced in the colours of Admiral Cary T, Grayson, but he reverted to his breeder this year. The dam of Bold Venture is Possible, who was by Ultimus, a sire whose blood is in so many good horses in U.S.A. The next dam, Lida Flush, was by the 1900 Stewards' Cup winner Royal Flush, a son of Faro.. From the viewpoint of English breeders the pedigree rather lacks interest from that point, as Lida Flush was out of Lida H., by Lisbon from Luella, by Wanderer—purely an American, line. Possible, in foal again to St. Germans, was sold at Saratoga last August for 3000 dollars, being then 15 yearsi old. ■ Brevity, who undoubtedly snouia have been this year's winner, is owned by Mr. J. E. Widener. He is described as a good-looking bay colt Chance Shot or Sickle, and the latter, judged on colour, conformation, covering, and date of foaling, .is without much question his actual sire. Sickle, a son of Phalaris, was owned by Lc>rd Derby before his export to America. In March Brevity put up « smashing performance m winning the Florida Derby, 9 furlongs, leading all the way and winning easing up by five jengths in lmin 481 sec, which equalled Discovery's record for the distance. A month later, however, in a nme-fur-long handicap, Indian Broom (who finifhed third in the Derby), carrying 7 12 reduced the time to lmin 47 3-ssec when beating Top Row, 8.12, by seven lG Mr h Widener, owner of Brevity, has not yet won the Kentucky Derby, but previously he gained a second with Osmand in 1927. Mrs. Dodge Sloan owner of Indian Broom, captured the event with Cavalcade two years ago.

SPRINTERS AS SIRES According to some opinions, breeding from sprinters must lead to the undermining of the constitution of the thoroughbred. "Mankato, the wellknown English breeding expert, recently wrote as follows in the London "Sporting Life": — "In man, and to an even greater degree in the racehorse, the sprinter is usually very robust in physique and sound in ■ constitution. Running short distances does not make .him less sound. In brief, there is no correlation between speed and constitutional weakness. Many horses who have won the Grand National were sprinters on the flat, and not high-class ones at that. And horses who could not offer to stay a mile have sired the best steeplechasers in history. Again, scores and scores of thoroughbreds used as hunter sires and of halfbreds generally have not been gifted with sufficient stamina to win any sort of a race, but there was nothing lacking in the constitution of their halfbred stock from the commonest of mares. "It cannot be too widely known that various qualities and constitutional disabilities have independent transmission. Roaring, blood-vessel breaking, string-halt, shivering, defect in one or other of the important ductless glands are just as likely to appear in a stayer as a sprinter. The Shire, Clvdesdale. and Suffolk Punch are not furnished with the physiological traits which goyern racing stamina. The fittest Shire's muscle fibre becomes loaded with fatigue products after he has been made to gallop about a auarter of a mile at his best pace. But the same horse has a fine constitution, and will work daily for years in a coal cart or as a railway shunt horse."

TURF NEWS IN BRIEF Nominations for the Wellington Racing Club's Winter Meeting,\to be held on July 7, 9, and 11, close at 8 o'clock on Friday evening. Nominations for the principal events at the C.J.C. Grand National Meeting are due on Friday week. With only seven rising two-year-olds at present in preparation at Trentham, the centre does not look like holding a strong numerical hand for early in the new season. Arctic King has done well since his recent racing at Otaki, but he will not be produced again till the Wellington Meeting, when the Parliamentary •Handicap will be his main assignment. Century Hurdles winners at Wanganui during the past twenty years who went on to highest honours at Ellerslie and Riccarton have included Lochella, Poanui, Mister Gamp, and Aurora Borealis. Gay Rose (8.7) has to be included in the list of acceptors for the Opotiki Cup at the Opotiki Meeting next Tuesday. According to a cable from Sydney, the New Zealand studmaster, Mr. G. M. Currie, after visiting George Price's stables, said he was impressed by the manner in which Gold Rod had developed since he left New Zealand as a yearling. ■ A. E. Ellis will be riding this week at the Wanganui Meeting, where he will handle One Whetu, Bantry, and Le Grand. . ~ _ , Invictus, who figures m the Grandstand Steeplechase at Wanganui on Saturday, was winner of the Century Hurdles at the Club's Winter Meeting two years ago. The Trentham horseman D. W. Bush, who gained successes on Trishna and Arctic Star last winter, has not had a ride over fences yet this winter, but he may have further opportunity shortly on some of the novice jumpers at present being schooled at Trentham. The late King Fuad of Egypt was a racing enthusiast, having a large string of English thoroughbreds and Arabs, and he had as trainer Elijah Wheatley, who headed the jockeys' list in England in 1905 with 124 successful mounts. The big sod wall at Wingatui is covered with grass on the take-off side, and, as the approach is the same! colour, a danger exists that a horse might in consequence misjudge a takeoff. The top of the wall is to be chipped for about six inches and whitened, so that the chance of misjudging will be reduced considerably. The Riccarton trainer A. S. Ellis has received a well-grown six-year-old fielding by The Ace from Mr. L J. Fechney, who had the good but unsound steeplechaser Lord Ranald a few years ago. The newcomer has done a little hunting, and he will be tried out for cross-country racing. According to a southern report Ripyal Limond has made good progress since he returned from Auckland, his knee being nearly all right again He is an acrebtor for the Duncchn Meeting, out a final decision about the trip will be reserved till later in the week. R. Beale will ride him in his engagement'; during the remainder of the campaign. j

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THE KENTUCKY DERBY, Evening Post, Volume CXXI, Issue 142, 17 June 1936

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1,301

THE KENTUCKY DERBY Evening Post, Volume CXXI, Issue 142, 17 June 1936

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