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GLORIOUS GOODWOOD

RECORD IN STEWARDS' CUP

AGA KHAN'S LATEST STAR (From "The Post's" Representative.) LONDON, August 3. Goodwood is usually preceded by the truly 'descriptive adjective "Glorious," just as Ascot is scarcely mentioned without the prefix "Royal." Each lovely course is in private ownership and each is used only once a year. Goodwood is on the estate of the Duke of Richmond and Gordon, and Ascot belongs to the King. Whereas in the case of Ascot the profits are spent in improving the course and its amenities, in the case of Goodwood a certain percfn^ge u of the Profit go to the upkeep of the huge property. Both courses are set amid leafy surroundings, but Goodwood is decidedly the more beautiful, as the track is set high up on,the Sussex Downs, where the air is bracing, the scenery is typically England at its best,-and, at race time, the rolling downs are coloured b3' masses of brilliant pinky-mauve valerian. The well-known- Trundle Hill, which commands a perfect view over the entire course, was once a free vantage for the. multitude, but now it is enclosed and is provided- with, tote buildings, so that for the moderate entrance fee of three shillings a day the holiday makers can see and enjoy four days of high-class racing. On the second day 9700 people paid for admission to this enclosure.

! Goodwood, however, is not a lucky i venue for the punter, for many are the | surprises that await the too-venture- ! some investors. The public nevertheless are always attracted where, high-class norses are the contestants. On. every day this week the weather has been | superb, so brilliant indeed that chiffons have been needed by the women, with large shady hats, whereas tradition associates Goodwood, with the tailor-made. There was a total absence of the "sea fret," which frequently rolls in from the coast not many miles away. THE STE^yARDS , CUP. ' As it is impossible to describe all the twenty-four events, it may suffice to refer briefly only to the chief race of each day. For the Stewards' Cup, one of the most important handicaps of the meeting, and one of the best events of the racing year, the entries included some of the speediest horses. • This prize was first competed for in 1840. This year there were - seventeen starters. The race was full of interest, the last 100 yards proving to be a great battle, and the thrilling finish was one of heads, in the record time of' lmin 12sec. Lady Ludlow's six-year-old gelding Greenore (Grand- Parader—Tuscan Rock, by Sunstar), trained by Captain O. Bell, at Lambourn, was the winner, with the stable companion Almond Hill second. The two horses were ridden by. the brothers Sam and Harry Wragg. In one of the most exciting finishes seen for a long time Sam beat Harry, but the latter thought he had forced a dead heat. Greenore, who was third in the Stewards' Cup last year; had not previously won this season, but had several times finished close up. The early running -was "made by Sunny Palm, with Tract, Paradise Lost, Flying Spear 11, and Priok allconspicuous. Cora Deans . and Kirk Royal were also prominent. At the distance Almond Hill drew out strongly on the far side, and her name was shouted as having won; but Greenore was going a shade faster at the finish and got his head in front. It was at desperate struggle between Greenore and'Almond Hill, with Cora Deans only a head off, and Solenoid anotherhead away in the fourth place. According to her trainer, Valkyrie, the favourite, had every chance.

It was appropriate that Greenore should win, as he was without a doubt unlucky when third to Figaro and Alluvial in the race a year ago,-when he had 51b more in the saddle than he carried this week. Lady Ludlow, one of the richest women.in;England, began to own blood-stock.eleven years ago. In her stable were" Peeping Tom (her first winner), Pepperminto, Longquill, Show-Girl,, and Hill- Song. A COMPLETE SURPRISE. The Goodwood Stakes, 2 miles 3 furlongs, is a very spectacular and important long-distance event, calling for great stamina, as. so much-is uphill from the start. .Here there, was no doubt about Harry Wragg catching the judge's eye, for he got .his mount, Hoplite (Winalot—Hegemony, by Phalaris) home four lengths in front of last year's winner, Claran, with Mallin a head away third, and the hot favourite, Damascus, last of the fourteen runners. Hopes ran high .that Claran would repeat his victory of 1934. Hoplite, owned by. Captain L. Montagu, and Mallin, owned by Mr.- T. B. Ellis, are both by that splendid.sire Winalot, one of whose progeny, Enfield, won the Cesarewitch last year. But no one was prepared for Hoplite's success, least of all, so.it is said, the stable. The gelding, was giving weight to, all his rivals. Damascus, ridden" by t Gordon Richards, was pacemaker, and he kept the lead splendidly for two miles, at the end of which he rapidly collapsed. Hoplite, who had been very near the end of the line for miles from the start, drew out from nowhere, in the straight a furlong from home, devastatingly increasing his lead until past the post. Claran became involved in some scrimmaging, and the. last two furlongs of firm going proved.to be too much for others in the field.' The little' grey horse Roi de Paris, who came fourth, should still be good for a long-distance handicap. THE CHESTERFIELD CUP.

The Chesterfield Cup, the chief event of the fourth day, is always watched with close attention, for now arid then the running indicates, a likely horse for the Cambridgeshire. Some exceptionally good middle-distance haridicappers were included in the entries. There were only ten runners, and-Iron-grey (Duncan Gray—Elmfield), owned by Lord Hirst, won-. readily' in the hands of Gordon. Richards. Irongr'ey was favourite; he is a consistent four-year-old, and. he was running' in preference to two' others fronv the stable. He won from Law Maker and Law Court. '

I The horses named were the'only ones really to fill the picture in the closing stages of this li-mile handicap event. Irongrey was.always well placed,-and' from the time that he-took the lead about a quarter of a mile from home he was never really headed, although Law Court had drawn up on the outside with a menacing run. The Richmond Stakes was 'very stylishly won by the Aga Khan's grey colt Mahmoud, by - Blenheim—Mah Mahal, by Gainsborough. By gaining this sixfurlong race he'has done better than any other two-year-old this" season. Miss Paget's Bossover colt had three engagements for the meeting, but declined them all. Bossover had been regarded as having an outstanding chance for any one of them, but all his victories have been over five furlongs. Racing experts therefore place the Aga Khan's good-looking grey at the top of the tree. His nearest competitor, | Confession Boy, by Warden of the Marshes, gave Mahmoud a good race, and Mr. Dewar's Blenheim—Sultan Ranee colt Vanbrugh was a good third. Mahmoud had previously won the Exeter Stakes at Newmarket,' and he will not be seen out again until August 29, at York, in the Gimcrack Stakes. He will be again ridden by F. Fox. Last year H.H. Asa Khan won the race with Bahram. Mahmoud was bred in France by his owner. He is trained at Newmarket bv F. Butter.

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Bibliographic details

GLORIOUS GOODWOOD, Evening Post, Volume CXX, Issue 61, 9 September 1935

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1,226

GLORIOUS GOODWOOD Evening Post, Volume CXX, Issue 61, 9 September 1935

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