Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

ROYAL ASCOT RACES

IMPROPER PRACTICES

WINDSOR LAD.AND BAHRAM

EACH WINS COMFORTABLY

(From Our Correspondent, byAir Mail.) LONDON, June 25. Sir Abe Bailey has twice won the Ascot Gold Cup, his successful horses having been lather and son—Foxlaw and Tiberius. Foxlaw met with a fatal accident in his box at Newmarket a couple of months ago, but the fates have been ,kind to his owner and have given him another Gold Cup winner to replace Foxlaw at the stud. There was added satisfaction in that he bred the winner of this year's Gold Cup. The Son-in-Law stock is proven over true Cup courses. Tiberius will next be seen in the Goodwood Cup, on August 1. He is to remain in training next season. Windsor Lad's next outing will be in the Eclipse Stakes, on July IS), and then will come retirement to the stud. His most recent victory was at Ascot last week, in the Rous Memorial Stakes, in which the Derby and St. Leger winner was opposed by H.H. the Aga Khan's Hairan and Colonel W. F. Story's Pampas Grass. Windsor Lad gave the last-named 251b over a mile. They raced practically level, Windsor Lad on the rails and the other well wide of him. A quarter of a mile from home Windsor Lad had to be put under pressure. Then was seen the excellence of the horse and his sterling merit. This great-hearted horse ran his race out with grand courage, and was a good, if not an easy, winner. The merit of the performance was shown by the fact that the classic colt, Hairan, was two lengths behind the second horse. Mr. M. H. Benson was delighted to bring Windsor Lad into the winning box, and experts in the racing world consider that Mr. Benson struck a bargain when he paid the Maharajah of Rajpipla £50,000 for him. WOMEN'S VICTORIES. Mrs. Corlette Glorney, an American owner and a very enthusiastic one, ran only two horses at Ascot and won with both. They were Assignation and Winandermere. The veteran, Steve Donoghue, still riding at the top of his form, was the jockey each time. The three-year-old Winandermere (Beresford—Grasmere) took the sixfurlong Cork and Orrery All-Aged Stakes, beating in convincing style all the way the elder Alluvial and The Divot, who did not stay. As The Divot is tubed, the wet conditions did not suit him. Mrs. Glorney's horse was also entered in an earlier race with Lord Woolavington's Easton, but she decided upon the less exciting event. If the filly had tackled Easton it would undoubtedly have been interesting. It is delightful to watch Mrs. Glorney's genuine pleasure. when winning; she pats her horse, plucks grass for him, and receives the congratulations of an immense number of friends. Her Son-in-Law colt Assignation easily won the Prince of Wales Stakes of 1 mile and 5 furlongs in a field of ten. Miss Dorothy Paget is a young owner who gives high prices for yearlings. Her expensive possession, Osway, though a beautiful filly, was nowhere in the Queen Mary Stakes, which went to France, but some consolation came two days later when her Blenheim colt Bossover won the New Stakes, one of the important two-year-old events of Ascot, by half a length from Lord Allendale's Allensford. Steve Donoghue was up. . Lady Ralli secured the Britannia Stakes on the last day, a 7 furlongs and 155 yards event, with her greatlyimproved colt Finalist (Winalot— Finery). Although an outsider in the field of 32, he scored for the fourth time in five events. For six furlongs it appeared as though' the confidence in Tract, a son of Papyrus, was to be justified, as he had the lead and was ioinE well. After, that lie began to fE and was well beaten There was a spectacular finish, and Finalist, despite being inclined to hang to the eft ust'held off Light Tackle by a short head. Zinder, from the Pnok StMr es' SfD-MUier's Ankaret took the CoronaUon Stakes, worth £4860 l the most valuable race at the meeting. This Blaudford-Sister Stella filly was, it. will be remembered, second in the Oaks. Lord Derby's Coronal, who started favourite in the Oaks but came in' only fifth, was again favourite, but could do no better than third The first to show in front were Ankaret, Corrida, and Coronal, Clerestory being the backmarker, and approaching the straight Ankaret was leading from Ricochet Lilo, and Coronal. Coronal became second below the distance but was passed, in the last furlong by Clerestory who came with a strong run Clerestory failed to overhaul Ankaret; who made all the running sindl won readily by two lengths. The time was lmin 47sec. EASTON FOR STUD. Fred Darling states that Lord Woolavington has decided that Easton shall not run again. He is sending him to the Lavington Stud next winter. Easton (Dark Legend-Phaona, byPhUaris), who was formerly owned by Mi. R. G. Strassburger, first came to, this country in May, 1934, when he finished second to Colombo in the Two Thousand Guineas. Lord Wqolavmgton immediately saw the possibilities of the colt and purchased him for a big sum, stated at the time to be about £15.°°°Easton finished second in the Deiby to Windsor Lad, and was then sent over to Paris, where he was third to Admiral Drake and Foulaubm m the Grand Prix de Paris at Longchamp. Later in the season he took his revenge over Admiral Drake in t the Grand International, d'Ostende, which he won easily. Last week he captured the Ribblesdale Stakes, 1 mile, in a field of six, with the filly Almond Hill (Craig an Eran— Philippine) a good second^ .• . . A colt whom everyone, wanted to see at close quarters in the paddock was the Derby winner Bahram (Blandford—Friar's Daughter, by Friar Marcus). His race was the valuable bt. James's Palace Stakes, 1 mile, for three-year-olds. For this there were only five runners,' and every conndence was placed in the Aga Khans colt. Of course he won, though the verdict was only a length from Lord Astor's Sansovino —Short Story colt Portfolio. Fresh Fox set the pace to Zingaro, Portfolio, and Bahram, but after going about half a mile Portfolio headed Fresh Fox, Bahram being next. Bahram was asked for his effort soon after turning into the straight, and, mastering Portfolio, won comfortably. The time was lmin 48 l-ssec. Watching the race, it was noticeable that F. Fox had to shake Bahram up to keep him there after he went to the • front in the straight. The colt is reported to be a lazy worker at times at home, and sometimes in his races he runs lazily. It is doubtful whether he liked racing on softer ground than he had ever known before. He will now have an easy time until his serious preparation for the St. Leger begins The St. Leger is to be run on September 11. .

.United l'ress Association—By Electric Telo jraph—Copyright. SYDNEY, July 12. After an inquiry into the nomination of the gelding Nightfall for a recent provincial meeting, a steward reported that while A. E. Smith, who figured as the trainer, had been taking the horse to the track, George Carter, a wellknown jockey, was its real trainer. Accordingly, Smith arid Carter and H. M. Bate, Nightfall's owner, were disqualified for twelve months under the improper practices rule. _ A further inquiry into a betting transaction in respect of Nightfall caused the stewards to find Carter guilty of dishonest and improper practices, and he was disqualified for two years, to be cumulative on the twelve months imposed on the other charge.

The Begum Aga Khan, wife of the Aga Khan, arrived at Croydon from Paris by air on the eve of Derby Day. After seeing the race she returned to Paris, also by air.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19350713.2.171

Bibliographic details

ROYAL ASCOT RACES IMPROPER PRACTICES, Evening Post, Volume CXX, Issue 12, 13 July 1935

Word Count
1,299

ROYAL ASCOT RACES IMPROPER PRACTICES Evening Post, Volume CXX, Issue 12, 13 July 1935

Working