Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image

STAGE AND SCREEN

"THE GOOD FAIRY."

'"The Good Fairy," which commences a season at the Regent Theatre tomorrow, in Universal's picturisation of the Molnar play iv which Helen Jayes appeared some seasons' back. Margaret Sullavan is the star and it is her tirst screen comedy role, her previous cinematic excursions ' having found her in touching dramas. But while Miss Sullavan is well nigh irresistable as the little Cinderella who believes in passing on to others the good that comes to her, the Molnar film would not be the delirious entertainment it is if Frank Morgan had not been cast to play the rich and fluttrey Mr. Koniad and if the producers had failed to assign Reginald Owen to the role of the jealous waiter, nor, for that matter, if Herbert Marshal] had not been available to take care Of the nore romantic aspects of the story and to wear the whiskers of Dr. Max Sporutn in the early scenes of the picture. As it. is, however, the picture has been expertly cast in all its parts, including those of Dr. Sletas, played by Eric Blore, the movie palace manager played by Alan Hale, and the orphan asylum director played by Beulah Bondi.

Debussy-Symphony Found. Claude Debussy's-brief summer . sojourn in Russia, at; the age of 16, which has given, rise'to !so much controversy among his critics and .biographers, comes again into prominence witL the' recent publication: of a hitherto,unknown symphony by the French master, the manuscript of which was discovered in Moscow. According to "Musical America," a Russian mathematician, K. S. Bogouchevsky, found the autograph' score bound in' with a secondhand printed volume of classic- symphonies arranged for piano four hands. The Debussy work is also for four hands, and the manuscript may be in the composer's own handwriting. It hits been published by the Russian State Mysic Publishers^ "Musical America's" critic says "it is pleasant music, music of about the same quality as the composer's 'Petite Suite,' . . . with little in it to reveal the Debussy who was later to emerge and .whom ,we have come to know." piekms In Opera. Dickens lovers will be interested to know that Albert Coates, the.eminent and fanciful' English composer,' is ' completing an opera in' four acts, with twelve scenes, with.the immortal "Pickwick" as the cen> tral figure. His score is said to be "a huge fresco of Victorian life ... differentiating the characters'appropriately with leading themes."; >■/■. ~ ' :

"The Mystery of Edwin Drood."

. "The' Mystery of. Edwin Drood" is one of the most mystifying of mystery-stories that-has,been, brought to.the screen in the last few years. The story centres round' John 'Jasper, played by Claude Rains, who is a cnoir leader in a cathedral in a little English village. But while he is a respected churchman' in public, he is a victim'of the opium habit in private life. Jasper is secretly in love with the fiancee of hia nephew, Edwin Drood. The girl is played' by' Heather Angel and his nephew is.played by David Manners. Into this strange triangle is injected a fiery youth from Ceylon, Neville Landless, played'by-Douglass Montgomery. Landless falls in love with Miss Angel and develops »'hatred', for young Drood, even going w far as to> attack him with a knife. Drooa disappears »nd some, of his clothing is found in the nearby river. His uncle is convinced that he has been murdered. To tell what) happened .would be to deprive one of the thrills of watching this mystery unravel.

"Hl|h.Jlnl»".B«rfved. Madge Elliott *and' Cyril Ritohard are making their farewell appearance in Australia at present in « revival of '.'High Jinks" produced for Messrs. J. C. Wil-, liamson by Mr. Ritchard' himself. ,This delightful and sparkling musical comedy is one of the best , .Otta Harbach-Rudolph Friml masterpiece* evereonceivediand'has, always-been a box-office success as well aa an artistic presentation. The cast includes Madge Elliott as Sylvia Dale, Cyril Ritchard as Dick Wayne, Frank Leigbton as Monsieur Jacques Rabelais, Leo Franklyn as Colonel Slaughter, Charles Zoli as Garcon. John Dobbie as J. J. Dempsey, Marie Le'Varre as Adelaide Fontaine, Jean Duncan as Mile. Chi-Chi, Ethel Morrison as Mrs. Marian Thome, Field Fisher as Dr. Robert Thorns. .Maryßigby, as Florence. Leslie Crane as Madame Rabelais, Jeljy. CgßSeUx; M EWfe . I

"Society Doctor."

Following the success of "Men in White," the medical drama in which Clark Gable and Myrna Loy scored one of their greatest hits, Metio-Goldwyn-Mayer brings to the screen, commencing in Wellington shortly, its new story of hospital life, "Society Doctor." In the new feature the-romance within the hospital walls is played by Chester Morris and Virginia Bruce. "Society Doctor," in which a lifetime of love, drama, and pathos is crowded into the brief span of eight hours, tells the story of Dr. Morgan,, young chief interne in an emergency hospital, and of his friendly enemy. Dr. Ellis, and their competition for the love of Madge Wilson, a pretty nurse. A splendid cast appears in "Society Doctor," together with Morris and Miss Bruce, among the principals being Billie Burke, to be seen in "Forsaking All Others," who this time garners laughs as a neurotic patient. Raymond Walburn and Henry Kolker as surgeons of the old school; Dorothy Peterson, William Henry, Mary Jo Matthews, Robert McWade, Donald Meek, Louise Henry, Johnny Hines, Addison. Richards, , and Bobby Watson,

A Paganini Play. A new play called "Paganini" was presented in London last month with Ernest Milton portraying the famous violinist in a story of the last-year of the composer's life. "David' Wells" wrote the story which brings in Chopin, Liszt, Berlioz, George Sand, and other celebrities of Paris of 1840. The author has drawn freely on the legend that Paganini was in league with the devil,' and an'important .character in the piece is his "familiar," George Harrys, a part played by Andrew Leigh. Ernest Milton gave a magnificent performance as Paganini, suggesting genius and at the same time giving a touch of weirdness to the character. Paganini made a grand subject for a macabre drama. Marian Mansfield. Marian Mansfield, radio singer recently signed by Paramount Pictures, sings' a duet with Bing Crosby in her first picture, "Here Is. My Heart," which is due for immediate release by that company. Miss Mansfield had both radio and amateur dramatic experience before going; to Hollywood. She and Bing Crosby sing "Love Is Just Around the Corner, written by Leo Robin and Lewis Gensler, a number that bids fair to be one of the most popular tunes of the year.

Star and Writer.

Conatance Collier, British stage star who has appeared in a number of outstanding productions both in-'London and New York, has signed, a contract with' Metro She is now in ,New York and will leave shortly for Hollywood to-begin work in talking pictures. Mist Collier appeared recently in London in a Charles Cochran production of "Hay Fever" and was last seen on the Broadway stage in "Dinner at Eight." In addition to her work behind the- footlights, her accomplishments'. as writer and director are many. ( She collaborated on the play "Peter Ibbetspn," was collaborator with Ivor Novello on "The Rat" and "Downbill," and wrote the • libretto.- for Deems Taylor's opera, "Peter Ibbetson." She directed the presentation of "Cherries are Ripe" with 'Rod La Rocque and Vilma Banky and the Hollywood, production of "Rebound," with.lna Claire. She is also the author of theatrical reminiscences, "Harlequinade." '

Jim Gerald to Go Abroad. , Jim Gerald, a popular Australian revue artist, who has played many times in New Zealand, is leaving on a world tour in March. Mr. Gerald, who was born in Darlington, Sydney, has never visited England, but is remedying that on the approaching tour. When he > was six or seven he toured with Fitzgerald Bros.' Circus and the Flying Jordans Circus. He visited Africa, India, and the Orient, and was in Egypt and Mesopotamia with the first Anzac Wireless Unit during the war. It is his intention to spend a touring holiday on the Continent for six months. Mr, Gerald offers to play at Birmingham and Drury Lane in "pantomime next Christmas, and he may form a unit.to stage productions in England, all' depending on the inducement he receives,

"The Call of the Wild." "The Call of the Wild," starring Clark Gable, is based on Jack London's story of Alaskan adventure, which Gene Fowler and Leonard Praskins have adapted to the screen. Madeline Carroll, star of the British stage and screen, will play the leading feminine role, Wendy Barrle. Wendy Barrie, the distinguished young English actress, haa been signed by the Paramount studios under a long-term contract for a series of leading roles. Notable of her work on the screen was her performance of Anne Boleyn in "Henry VIII."

Plays for Children. The Children's -Theatre. Association in California us an x organisation recently formed for the-presentation of plays for young people from. 6 to 13, and promises to have ''a more permanent life than any of the many such enterprises that ■ have gone before. The; Board 'of', Education eponsors the-plan, and < the organisations that have merged- include the Junior League and' private' producers. There is an advisory board of business men and women. The plays to be presented are "The Pied Piper of Hamlin," ".Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm,"- "Siege at Christmas," "The Toy, Maker," "The Swiss Family Robinson/ "The 'Lady of the Lake," "The Lost ■ Dauphin," and "Tom Sawyer."

"The Little Minister."

One of the largest, and most notable casts in; film history is seen in RKO Radio's > dramatisation .of Sir James Barries "The Little Minister." Headed by Katharine,Hepburn, starred in the role of Babbie, the. players include John Bean as the Berious-minded little minister, Alan Hal.' as Rob Dow, Andy Clyde as "Wearyworld." Donald' Crisp as the kindly, understanding physician, -Mary Gordon as the pathetic Nanny, Beryl.-Mercer as the gentle mother, and many others. Richard Wallace, who directed ■ the picture, has kept each character in / tune with Barries inimitable delineation. ,

Honeymoon. The honeymoon, of Evelyn Lave and Frank < Lawton took them to England. This was the Christinas gift from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer when production plans were so arranged as to permit the visit'before the start of Miss Laye's next picture, "Love While You May." The heroine of "The Night is Young" and. the hero of "David Copperfield" are spending two weeks in England before ' returning for their - Hollywood screen -engagements, Kordt Film.

-Robert Flaherty, whose "Man of Aran" has been shown, has been signed by Alexander Korda, of London Films, to make a film in India, tentatively titled "Elephant Boy." A! complete trait will shortly leave for the Orient. United Artisti will • distribute the picture.

Old Bailey Drama. The Campbell Dixon play "Mrs. Far rons Defence" has changed its title and n being piesented in London .under thi name of "Old Bailey." As the'title null cates, there is a court scene at the Old Bailey, where Henry Hallatt, asa lawyer, is defending a beautiful woman on • charge of murdering her hußband. A brother of Clive Brook, Neville Brook, playt the prosecuting counsel, and there; is-ft highly-effective climax, described asitnoct original, following the acquittal of the woman. Margaret Kawlinge, who was -here in "The Barrett* of Wimpole1 Street" wijh her husband, Gabriel Toyne, as Jproduc«t is playine the woman on trial. *■ t " _

Constance Bennett. ' ; , -Constance Bennett, who-is • now• co-star* ring with Clark Gable 'in; ''After r Office Hours," has signed, a long-term contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. ' Miss Bennett recently completed;work in "Outcast Lady," with Herbert Marshall., ' ' Signed. " >' • . Arthur Byron has been,signed for <two important' roleß in Metrc-Goldwyn-Mayer pictures. He will first play Bellwood, th« millionaire in "Shadow of Doubt,". detective mystery story - with Virginia *Bruc« and Rioardo Cortez. On finishing his role in this, he will playKincaid in- "Tb» Casino Murder Case," one*of!th»;fatnou» Philo Vance stories.

"Rendezvous at MidhtsJit. 1*

What is described, as one .«f the most gripping dramas of-mystery,'crime,;, and romance that has come tovthe-screenvra a long while is "Rendezvous at Midnight."featuring Ralph Bellamy and Valeric ;Hobson." It is.the story of a wealthy,'.spoiled girl who is in love with the yountr police commissioner of New York City. He is as deeply in love with her is she is with'hinu but refuses to allow his lore ~to interfere with his duties. One of the most lavish displays of feminine' fashions ever placed on the screen will be seen in this film: One of the big sequences iB laid in a fashionable New York gown shop, The'support* ing cast includes many well-known players.

Cooper's Trophies. - Trophies which Gary-Cooper' gathered daring his ■ hunting expedition-"to Africa a year or two ago were Mnwed by Paramount for use in "Menace," featuring Gertrude Michael, Paul Cavanagh, and John Lodge. The opening scene* of, the film are laid in the Tropic^and the tropical house built on one of the sets is adorned with specimens of Cooper's hunting prowess. Robert Young. - * < ' Robert Young has been ■ given ■an important role in "Wert Point,of the, Air," in which Wallace Beery has the principal masculine role. The'pictured soon'tebe placed in production at a Texas-flying base, where director Richard Reason-and a camera crew have already gone- tor advance preparations.- . •' . .

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19350328.2.97

Bibliographic details

Evening Post, Evening Post, Volume CXIX, Issue 74, 28 March 1935

Word Count
2,171

STAGE AND SCREEN Evening Post, Volume CXIX, Issue 74, 28 March 1935

Working