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IN TEN YEARS

TOURIST PROSPECTS

MORE FACILITIES NEEDED

NEW MILFORD ROAD

An interesting prophecy regarding tourist traffic in New Zealand in ted years' time was made by Mr. J.'wi Collins, New Zealand Trade Commissioner and "representative of the Tourist and Publicity Department in Canada and the. United States of America, .when interviewed by a representative of "The Post" today. Mr. Collins said that the greatest advance made towards attracting tourists t<f New Zealand in recent years was the construction of the Milford Sound Road, which would enable overseasvisitors to travel through some of the; finest scenery, in the world without difficulty. \ -■-■; Visualising New Zealand's tourist trade in ten years' time, .Mr. Collins said that the Dominion's greatest handicap at-the present time was its isolation. It had magnificent, scenery, and when speedier transport brought it nearer to the more thickly-populated countries the tourist traffic would make great increases. In ten years, he said. New Zealand's population should be about two millions and- Australia's about eight millions. By then, too, Aus-! trahan visitors should be able to cross the Tasman Sea in two days and see a great deal of New Zealand without occupying too much time in doing so. Mr. Collins visited the Te Anau-Mil-lord Sound highway while in Southland with, the object of gaining information for his publicity work in America, and it was of the road and its probable effect on New Zealand's tourist traffic that he had most to say. The new road, he considers, will be most popular with tourists, as it provides wonderful views of lake, mountain forest, and river scenery. "I have been to Banff three or four times," Mr. Collins said, "but it hasrft anything to compare with the scenery along that road. Switzerland and the Rockies may have mountain scenery as good, butihey have not the flora. There is nothing to compare with it in- the SCENIC PANpRAMAS. The road through the Eglinton Valley opened up marvellous, panoramas towards the end of its present formation, Mr. Collins continued, the last tea miles being particularly fine. When the road was completed it would be a motorists' and hikers' paradise, and provision should be made in advance for the traffic that would pass over it „ In. ten years from noxv, said Mr.' Collins, tourists would land at Milford and motor through the southern cold lakes country before going north, arid fS£-£™? c north would dePart from Milford after seeing both islands 7 tilf Pr°Per facilities were provided for travellers it was safe to say that Iv6^^? mV? Td would be travelled by 25,000 tourists during the season between November and April. A large number of those to visit the road would be New Zealanders, but if its attracah™ 7-? 6 gi7en pr °Per Publicity £w? * would attract thousands of tourists from overseas. _ Thousands of tourists visited places in America that have not the claim.to beauty that New Zealand .has, Mr. Collins said. That was partly due to the ■Sw ?° P-^ tion Md P^ due to thl better facilities provided. If New Zealand was going to offer Milford: Sound as an attraction to tourists the necesSSw"^l^ Should be Provided. During the present season the hotel accommodation at Te Anau had proved inadequate, scores of tourists, having to be turned away. That was being ™^ d t by th. c buildin g of better accommodation, but there was much that could be done along the road. AMENITIES NEEDED. . The Eglinton Valley was-a happy hunting ground for hikers and thousandscould be attracted there if tracks were made through the surrounding country. Provision should be made, J possible, for landing grounds for aeroplanes, and wherever there was accommodation, facilities for indoor and outdoor games should be provided. Mr Collins expressed the opinion that the itineraries mapped out for tourists were not sufficiently elastic. Visitors went to the show places of the Dominion and had to leave again without seemg them if the weather prevented, them from going out of doors In America provision was made against such a state of affairs, and if tourists became weather bound they were kept happy and contented by the facilities provided for recreation indoors, and could see the district: as soon as the weather cleared. : .By comparison, said Mr. Collins there was nothing better in Canada or the United States of America, but in both the latter countries the hotel and transport facilities for holiday places were infinitely superior. He considered that tourists could be attracted to New Zealand;by proper publicity, but the most important thing was to send them away again well satisfied with the way they had been treated. Consequently when amenities were being planned in a new district, as at Milford, provision should be made for both indoor and Outdoor games. The weather conditions at Milford made it specially necessary for provisions for entertainment so .that guests could remain in comfort if they were held up by wet weather.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19350227.2.81

Bibliographic details

IN TEN YEARS, Evening Post, Volume CXIX, Issue 49, 27 February 1935

Word Count
818

IN TEN YEARS Evening Post, Volume CXIX, Issue 49, 27 February 1935

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