Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

DREDGE WHAKARIRE

PURCHASE BY NAPIER

MAINTENANCE OF PORT

SOUND AS WHEN BUILT

The Napier Harbour Board recently adopted the recommendation of its finance committee that the works cornmitteo be empowered to purchase the dredge Whakarircat a cost of £10,500 from the Wellington Harbour Board. This has now been done, and the dredge, which is also known in Napier, having been there several years ago on loan, will shortly be leaving Wellington. Before making the trip, she will be docked this afternoon for cleaning and overhaul. In response to the advertisement by tho Napier board, replies were received from the Gisbornc, AVellington, and Bluff Harbour Boards. The AVhakariro proved to be the most suitable for the proposed work. Tho first work to be done is in an area at the Breakwater. At tho recent meeting of the Napier Harbour Board, tho feeling of members generally was that Napier required an efficient dredge, and the Whakarire will be employed to undertake the maintenance of the port. That, and not simply tho carrying out of some harbour scheme, is the primary motive for the purchase. ' ' ■ Mr. A. E. Jull stated that the Inner Harbour iriust bo kept open for tho efficient maintenance of a lightering fleet, and that more efficient dredginw apparatus than the board's vessel J.D.O. was vitally necessary.- His amendment to the motion of purchasing the dredge, that it should not be completed till the poll was taken on the proposal to borrow £335,000, was defeated. During the meeting it was stated that the Inner Harbour was worse than at any_ time since the. earthquake. In addition to added efficiency, it would save- the board thousands of pounds a year in tho dredging of the Inner Harbour. HARBOUR HISTORY. The Whakarire was ordered in the first place by tho AVellington-Harbour'Bbard mainly to deal with Falcon Shoal, near the entrance to the harbour, which, with the coming of vessels of deeper draught than those of previous years, required to.be deepened. Dredging operations were in progress at the shoal for about two years, during which time the vessel was working day and night, until a depth of seven fathoms was attained in that part of the harbour. Since then the Whakarire. has performed much notable work in keeping the harbour in an efficient condition. Aided by the Wanganui Harbour Board's suction dredgo Kaione^ she dredged the'site for the Jubilee Dock and its wharf. Her activities have otherwise been confined mainly to lifting spoil from the harbour bed and depositing it at points where reclamation work was being carried out (as at the Thorndon reclamation), and to keeping tho desired depth of water alongside the wharves. ' ' TYPES OF DREDGES. Among tho many types of dredges built for various purposes, that to which the AVhakarire belongs, the bucket hopper type, is the most' common. This is tho most generally useful type, and possesses the advantage of nianoeuverability and efficiency when in action. The Whakarire can move about under her own power, although for actual dredging work she is almost invariably moored in position. Whilst the Whakariro brings the spoil to the surface by means of steel buckets, the Eileen Ward, which recently visited this' port for overhaul, uses a suction pump. Another type uses a grab/whilst there is also a spoon, or "dipper," type, which employs a spoon-shaped-apparatus on the" end of a long pole. . ■ The Whakarire has an endless chain of buckets working around a ladder, which is hinged at the top and capable of extension to tho desired depth. A deep well, through which the ladder and buckets pass, divides the hull of tho vessel. From the top of the ladder a lievelled rod connected to tho wheel runs to the engine-room, and with this tho endless chain is hauled up. The buckets dig into the sea bed, turn over the end of the ladder mechanism, run up again, and turn over at the top, emptying the spoil into tho vessel's hold. Though the wear on various parts of the dredge is severe, the Whakarire is stated to be in as sound condition as when she left the Renfrew yards of Lobuilz and Co., Ltd., in 1903. The lins of the buckets, tho rollers carrying the chain, and tho top tumbler, over which the buckets turn, are subject to heavy wear, and are made of the very best high carbon cast steel. Two years ago the then chief engineer of tho Wellington Harbour Board slated to the makers that the tail shafts and stern bushes we're those originally supplied with the dredge, and, after having received no special attention or repairs, had been referred to as being practically wearproof. The boiler also had many years of life before it. LIFE OF SERVICE. \ Built under the supervision of Mr. Alex. Mac Donald; superintending engineer to Messrs. J. P. Cory and Co., the dredgo was launched'on April 15, 1903, and* arrived in Wellington on October 25 of tho same year, after making the voyage under her own power. During tho trip she dented some plates, and was repaired on the slip. Tho Whakarire is a twin-screw vessel of 819 tons gross and 450 tons net register, has a length of 180 ft, a beam of 36ft, /a depth of hold of 13ft, and a moulded depth of 16ft. Sho is capable of dredging at a depth of 43ft, with a twenty-inch suction pipe operating at the samo depth. Her two main engines are each rated at 60 nominal horse-power, and' > guaranteed to exert 250 indicated horse-power. On the propelling trials the engines jointly exerted 575 indicated horsepower.. The vessel, with 6-16 tons of spoil on board, drew lift Tin forward and 13ft sin aft, and steamed at 7.17 knots on the measured mile. When light, with empty hoppers, a, speed of •7.51 knots was attained. In both cases the outboard suction pipe' was in position. This was removed before the vessel left for Port Said, to which port from the Clyde, her speed averaged 7-} knots. The dredge sailed from the Clyde on July 9, 1903, and arrived at AVellington October 25, after ninety days' steaming, so that the speed was maintained very satisfactorily on the voyage.

The cost of the dredge, delivered in Wellington, including some additional anchors and chains and covering exchange, supervision, and other charges, ■was'•about £.39,150. Afterwards, 500 lineal feet of 24in steel riveted pipes for delivering spoil for reclamation purposes and the' 40-buckct apparatus were purchased. ;

On December 1, 1903, the Whnkarirc commenced dredging of the. Glasgow and Railway Wharves, and in the following year she dredged the Taranaki Street Wharf site, depositing the spoil on the reclamations at Clyde Quay and Waterloo Quay. , '

Up till 1931, she had been laid up for periods aggregating' five years, and, while in commission, had worked for 87,255 hours, 23,540 of which were spent in actual dredging, and had lifted over 6,330i000 tons'of spoil. Four and a half million tons had been pumped ashore by the dredge into the various reclamations.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19340202.2.82

Bibliographic details

DREDGE WHAKARIRE, Evening Post, Volume CXVII, Issue 28, 2 February 1934

Word Count
1,168

DREDGE WHAKARIRE Evening Post, Volume CXVII, Issue 28, 2 February 1934

Working