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TRAINER TO ROYALTY

LATE MR. RICHARD MARSH

MANY CLASSIC s'IICCfeSSES

(From "The Post's" Representative.) LOXDOX, May 20. Iticharil Mai ah, author of the autobiographj-, ''A Trainer to Two Kings," has died. He -was over eighty. Every patron of the Turf was familiar with his name, fov he was one of the most successful trainers of his time. Ilia patrons included the late Iving Edwaid, the late Duke/of Devonshire, the late Mr. AvthuiJames, Lord Marcus Btresford, the -Duke of1 Hamilton,, and Mr. Leopold do Kothschilil. - His Dame will always bo associated "with the stirring' victories of Persimmon, Diamond Jubilee,, and Minoru tit Epsom in the colours of King Edward. In his early days Mr. Marsh was a jockey. From 1576 to 1924 (in which year lie retired), lie was a sucuesbful and renowned trainer. It was "in November, 1924, that the accompanying announcement ivas issued 'from Buckingham Palace:— . Mr. Richard Marsh, the King's trainer, has asked to be allowed to retire, and his Majesty has, with much icgret, accepted his resignation. Mr. Marsh, who is now over seventy years of age, hiis for the last thirty-one years been employed as trainer to the King and King Edward, and during that period has achieved many remarkable successes on the Tuxf. HIS EARLY SUCCESSES. Xew Zealand readers who like to be informed on English Turf topics will find the accompanying nummary from the "Morning Post" of interest:--Mr. Mai-bh began his career as trainer with a private establishment at Six Mile Bottom, and, in 1870, took Lordship Kaim, Newmarket. One of his earliest patrons was the Duke of Hamilton, for whom he won the St. Leger of 18S3 with Ossian. In 18SG he sent Miss dummy out from Lordship Farm to win the One Thousand Guineas and the Oaks for the Duke of Hamilton. Soon afterwards the lnte Duke of Devonshire's horses came under his care, and for his new patron he won the Royal Hunt Cup of 1890, and also the Gold Cup of 1891 with Morion, and the Stewards' Cup at Goodwood in 1890 and 1892 with Marvel. At this time the Prince of Wales, afterwards King Edward VII, removed his horsel; from Kingsclere to Marsh's establishment at Newmarket. I Marsh went from the Lordship Farm to the newly-biu'lt Egerton House in'the autumn of 1892. One of the first of King.Edward's horses to win races when in his care was Florizel 11, the iirs,t of tli.it notable trio of brothers produced by Hie gvc.it Snndriugham marc Perdita TI. He was followed Boon aftcrwaids by his brother, I'er.siinmbn, who won the Derby of 1890 after a terrific struggle with the Two Thousand winner, St. Frusquiu. In 1898 Marsh was able to put the Derby to his credit for the second time. ■■■; He h.id two &tnrtcrs for the grrat race, the tnvouvitc of theipair being thr Duke of Devonshire's Dicudonuc, but this colt ran disappointingly, and the race went to Marsh's second stiing-, Mr. J. XV. Lavtinch's Jeddah; who >tnrtcd at the ioilofii odds'of 100 to J. Marsh's third triumph at Epsom was gained in 1900, when he won the Derby with the queer-tempered Diamond Jubilee. This brother of Persimmon also won the Two Thoiihand Guineas, the St. Leper, the Eclipse Stakes, and the Jockey Club Stakes,. HIS GREATEST TRIUMPH. Perhaps the greatest of all the tiainei'M triumphs was gained ■ wu- Minoru in 1909. Ttiis horse had displayed only moderate form as a two-year-old, but in the following season superior condition enabled him to gain a decisive victory over the strongly-fancied Valent. at Newbury. Then he won the Two Thousanu Guineas. In tho Derby, Minoru, although heavily backed, was not to well fancied as the American-bred Sir Martin. And there were m^ny who thought that Bayardo would beat both of them. What would have happened if' Sir Martin had not fallen during tho race, thereby, interfering with' one or two of the other runners, it is impossible to say. For the huge crowd it was good enough to sec the King's horse battling out a most exciting linis-h with Mr. W. Raphael's Lomiers and Lord Mii-liclham'h William the Fourth. Tho hoisting of Minoru't> number in the frame was the signal for, perhaps, the most memorable scene ot enthusiasm ever witnessed upon the racecourse. Amid all the recipients of, congratulations that day. Marsh was not forgotten. It was probably the finest thing he had over done as trainer, lor Minoru was not such a good horse as many believed him to 1 i, and it was only the exquisite condition in which he was 'ncnfe. to the post that enabled him to pull through at Epsom. v The last winner for King Edward was Witch of the ..Air, at Kempton Park on the afternoon of the day on which his Majesty died. The announcement of the filly's success yras one of the final intimations the King received. On the death of King Edward in May, 1910, King George decided to carry on his father's racing interests. Among the successful horses Mr. Marsh trained for the present King were Friar Marcus, who, as a two-year-old, was never beaten, and Knight of the Garter. When Mr. Marsh retired he was awarded the M.V.O. Among the testimonials he received was a cheque for over £3000, subscribed at the suggestion of Sir Walter Gilbey and Mr. S. Tattersall. QUEEN VICTORIA'S DEMAND. In 1890, Queen Victoria &cnt Marsh a messace to say'that if he could assure her that Persimmon would win she- would once more, and for the last time, join the lloyal party in the State procession at Ascot. To make sure Marsh tried Persimmon early in the week before Ascot with two good horses, when ho accomplished such a great performance that he thought it must be wrong, so on the Saturday he set him a bit more to do, with a similar result. Ho then wrote to the Queen simply: "Your Majesty can go to Ascot without the slightest qualm, for Persimmon will win easily enough." After the race Queen .Victoria sent for the trainer and thanked him .in her usual kindly ■nay. It -nus, her last visit to a racecourse. In his autobiography Mr. Mais-h l dated I an amusing incident. | Shortly after Minom's famous victory ai photograph was to be taken at Egerton House of the owuer. stables manager, trainer, and jockey of the winning hoisc. Accordingly,, King Echv.ird, Lord Marcus Bcrcfcford, Marsh, and Herbert Jones (jockey)' were all posed together. Unfortunately, "just that one morning Minoru was rather naughty. He showed the utmost dislike of having his- photograph taken. " I do not know exactly how long the operation took, but it s,eemed ages. '■ The horse'would not pose, aud the King showed much irritation. His movements reacted on all of us, as in my own agitation I evidently did not button up my jacket to the hold opposite— which I were intended to receive the buttons in their proper order. "Probably I put the top button into the second button-hole, and the fact was noticed by his Majesty when the proof was submitted to him. For I received a note from an equerry informing me that the writer had been commanded to warn me not to fasten my jacket to my trousers on any future occasion when I might have the honour of being photographed with (he King." During his period aF trainer to King George, Mr. Marsh was adjudged ft bankrnpU >sith liabilities of more than .>J30,000, and assets estimated at £3.)20. The creditors accepted'a cash offer of 5s in the £. and the King, "out of consideration of his late father's old servant and lih own servant," provided £8000 tqwauls Ilio sum upces-saiy lo meet tho composition.

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Bibliographic details

TRAINER TO ROYALTY, Evening Post, Volume CXVI, Issue 2, 3 July 1933

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1,283

TRAINER TO ROYALTY Evening Post, Volume CXVI, Issue 2, 3 July 1933

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