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CAPTAIN COOK

A STATUE UNVEILED

GIFT TO CHRISTCHURCH

-; -LORD BLEDISLOE'S SPEECH

(By Telegraph.) (Special to "The Evening Post.") CHRISTCHTJRCH, 10th August. - A marble statue of Captain Cook, presented to the city by Mr. M. F. Barnett, ;and sculptured by Mr. W. T. Trethe- - W3y, both of Christehurch, was unveiled to-day by the Governor-General, Lord Bledisloe. In the course of; an address, in which he traced the career of the great navigator, His Excellency said that the statue would ever remain a noble memorial and reminder of a great man. \ "If patriotism is to find it 3 fullest expression in this Dominion, if pride in its not - unworthy past is to stimur late, inspire, and materially advance its potential' greatness in the future, a sense of nationhood must be developed among all classes of the community," said the Governor-General. "If this ; sense of nationhood among New Zeaglanders—a vital condition of the. effectiveness of Empire partnership—is to be promoted, a knowledge; of their country's history should'form a funda . mental part' of the intellectual equips nient of all classes, and be not merely inculcated in the days of early youth, but also cherished proudly and patriotically throughout life. ...■,..: '' In the early history of New Ze"a; land there are three outstanding landmarks —its effective discovery by James Cook, then a' lieutenant in the Royal Navy,'in 1769; its ■ Christianisation, commencing with the arrival of Samuel Maisden in 1814; and its inclusion in the British Empire under the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840. But for the first the second would have been impro; table and tho: third impossible. MIGHT HAVE BEEI FRENCH. "Indeed, if popular rumour be correct, Cook's far-sighted enterprise might have been defeated in the very year of the Treaty, at least so far as ' this South Island is concerned, by a little venture which had Akaroa as its objective. In that event you might all to-day be speaking French, and a French Governor-General might be unveiling a statue, not of Captain Cook, ' l>ut of Captain Langlois or Commodore Lavaud. "The notable events which I havo mentioned, are all landmarks of which New Zealanders have every reason to be proud, and which havo conduced to \ the- greatness, the civilisation, and tho ordered progress of" this country. All are associated with names, European and Maori, which will be honoured through the centuries, and none of them with more world-wide veneration or more general assent than that of the intrepid explorer, Captain James Cook. "Captain Cook was born at Martoti, in Yorkshire, in 1728, and was the son of an agricultural labourer who subsequently became a, farm bailiff. Ho himself commenced • life as a haberdasher's apprentice, but, owing to exceptional natural talents, great industiy, and abounding enterprise, became famous in the varied role of mathematician, astronomer, naval commander, physician, surveyor, and the first and foremost among all British maritime '. discoverers. ■ ■ A LIFE OS DISCOVERY. ':--.:■ '^During his 51 years of crowded,adventure, penetrating travel, and • dis- • -covery he did more than any ,man of : his century to enrich the world with - topographical knowledge and Britain with world-wide territory. He was a ■ man of commanding personal presence, ■ possessed of sagacity, decisive judg- • meat, amazing perseverance, and lovable' disposition. While a firm disciplinarian he displayed toward his shipmates and. subordinates a degree of ; kindly sympathy and regard for their ■ health, comfort, and happiness unsur- . passed in the annals of the sea. . . "During his three great expeditions ho proved himself. tc- be a most able and intrepid sailor, a self-trained scientist of no mean repuf.e, an ardent and pertinacious discbveri,r, and a marine surveyor whose conscientious work has evoked the praise and gratitude of j thousands of mariners who have since sailed the high seas. ' He shattered alike the fables of the Great Antare^ tic ContinAit and of tho North-west Passage, and he gave to his country a title to her .extensive and valuable territories in the Southern Hemisphere." At the conclusion of the ceremony, when Mr, Barnett was acknowledging the thanks offered him, he said it was a little unfortunate that; t unveiling should take place at a time when there . was so much distress aniong.the people. However, he had made the gift in the comparatively good times of three years s • ago. In view of the distress "now prevalent, he handed to the Mayor )s. cheque for 100 guineas for the Mayor's fund for the relief of distress.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19320811.2.34

Bibliographic details

CAPTAIN COOK, Evening Post, Volume CXIV, Issue 36, 11 August 1932

Word Count
729

CAPTAIN COOK Evening Post, Volume CXIV, Issue 36, 11 August 1932

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